1. spantch101's Avatar
    What's everyone's take on biometrics for mobile phone security? I for one dont care, but it seems a lot of people do. I also know you can disable such a feature , but I got to thinking last night about the Sony phones in the US having patent issues with their phone's having the scanner in the power button. What if the scanner doesn't care that you disabled it? It won't be used for unlocking purposes but imagine this, a criminal that is registered in the national databases would have finger prints on file. What a great tool if devices randomly sent out biometric info collected just from pressing a button. Technically we don't know if our devices still capture a print when we touch the sensor. And if it did who's to say it a third party isn't able to obtain it? If I was a criminal and used a fingerprint the phone could technically be a digital tattle tale. It could upload my print to be scanned jn the database. If there was a match they could then trace the phone associated. Meaning even burner phones would have an identity behind them . I know this may seem a bit ridiculous but I just got to thinking and now I ask you to do the same
    02-28-17 04:32 AM
  2. dangerousfen's Avatar
    Joe Ninety stuff eh?

    "Z30 STA100-2 UK" 10.3.2.2876
    02-28-17 05:42 AM
  3. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    I'm the one (a bit alone lol).
    Globally the problem is : I believe using a non modifiable ID (whatever it is) is a very bad idea.
    I'm not sure how/if I'll use the KEYone fingerprint sensor (yes you can deactivate it), but chances are, if possible, I will not use my actual fingerprint but instead somewhere between the base of my thumb and the palm of my hand.
    Seems possible, have to check...
    To resume this would be a kind of "physical image password" since the print used won't be my finger's.
    02-28-17 06:16 AM
  4. spantch101's Avatar
    Joe Ninety stuff eh?

    "Z30 STA100-2 UK" 10.3.2.2876
    Had to search for this, lol. Seems like a show I'd be interested in. Haha and yea I don't know where my train of thought was this morning after my first cup of coffee. But then it just started to seem like it's possible it's already happening on a bigger scale than we think. Not important if you're not a criminal or a target of espionage hahah. .
    02-28-17 07:10 AM
  5. Dmd74's Avatar
    As far as biometrics on phones, I honestly don't care per se in regards to unlocking the device. I find a fingerprint scanner very convenient though when using it to sign into websites such as for banking.

    I imagine there is the capability of third parties gaining your fingerprint and utilizing it for whatever means. It seems slightly far fetched to me, but is probably more likely that I imagine.
    02-28-17 11:53 AM
  6. bakron1's Avatar
    Myself, I like the fingerprint scanner and for me it adds an extra level of security on my device. Combined with a good PIN code, I haven't had any device security issues yet.
    02-28-17 04:24 PM
  7. anon(9721108)'s Avatar
    Facial recognition is the future.

    I remember when Apple put the scanner on the iphone 5S (I believe it was the first for Apple anyway?) and Apple had to assure the paranoid people out there that the print doesn't go further than inside the iphone to unlock the device for the owner. I guess people were concerned they would be put on some FBI database or something. I suppose anything might be possible but they would have been up for a huge lawsuit likely IF they ever betrayed the trust of the customers in that way....

    -sent from a beautiful Bold 9900
    Fret Madden likes this.
    02-28-17 04:37 PM
  8. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    It's not about X or Y being dishonest, it's about the next incompetent... That day ...
    I don't want to be the conspiracy Armageddon guy but can't refrain considering this.
    Imagine the day it'll be so usual it'll be on your (connected) fridge or toaster ...
    03-01-17 02:02 AM
  9. donnation's Avatar
    Before BlackBerry had fingerprint scanners they were seen as gimmicks. Now that they have them they are seen as an extra level of security. Not everyone felt this way, but if you look back at posts on here when they started to become popular, people mostly bashed them as unnecessary. Now they are mostly seen as a good thing.
    MikeX74 likes this.
    03-01-17 06:27 AM
  10. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    I said this in another thread, but I recall when fingerprint scanners started appearing on smartphones, the prevailing wisdom here was there'd be an uptick in finger choppings due to unseemly characters trying to get into people's devices.
    03-01-17 06:41 AM
  11. MikeX74's Avatar
    Before BlackBerry had fingerprint scanners they were seen as gimmicks. Now that they have them they are seen as an extra level of security. Not everyone felt this way, but if you look back at posts on here when they started to become popular, people mostly bashed them as unnecessary. Now they are mostly seen as a good thing.
    The same thing happened when Apple introduced their 64-bit A7 SoC(in the same phone they introduced their fingerprint sensor), as I recall. Android fanboys(and one Qualcomm executive) laughed it off as a gimmick, but almost four years later, most flagship Android phones have one. It's easy to call something a gimmick until it becomes useful to you.
    03-01-17 07:32 AM
  12. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    The same thing happened when Apple introduced their 64-bit A7 SoC(in the same phone they introduced their fingerprint sensor), as I recall. Android fanboys(and one Qualcomm executive) laughed it off as a gimmick, but almost four years later, most flagship Android phones have one. It's easy to call something a gimmick until it becomes useful to you.
    Yep.

    Vkbs, wireless charging, videochat, heck... Netflix. All useless until folks get access to them.
    Fret Madden likes this.
    03-01-17 08:33 AM
  13. bb10adopter111's Avatar
    The challenge with Biometric security systems is that they can be implemented in many different ways. Some of these implementations are very secure and difficult to exploit, either for inappropriate access or to violate user privacy. And others are laughably easy to "hack" and exploit.

    Unfortunately, very few consumers know the difference, and their susceptibility to being exploited is the real problem, not the technology itself. The only probable solution to this would be an industry certification (which could still be counterfeited) that could reduce the chance that someone uses an insecure biometric security system.

    Posted with my trusty Z10
    Superfly_FR likes this.
    03-01-17 10:46 AM
  14. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    @bb10adopter111 : +1 @donation & @Tre Lawrence : it is a gimmick. A popular and convenient gimmick but still. I sign again. There's no example on earth where fingerprint alone is considered as safe. Nowhere but on smartphones. More, it violates the most basic and invariant rule of security : a code must be changeable.

    Don't extrapolate too fast though. BlackBerry is aware of that. So much the recommended scenario for proper solid implementation in enterprise is ...
    Fingerprint will only unlock personal data. For anything business : type your 6 digit code.

    Edit : i realize I'm spitting against the wind and it's too late now to rumble, another lost cause... Maybe I'm too old, finally.
    Last edited by Superfly_FR; 03-01-17 at 07:00 PM.
    03-01-17 05:59 PM
  15. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    @bb10adopter111 : +1 @donation & @Tre Lawrence : it is a gimmick. A popular and convenient gimmick but still. I sign again. There's no example on earth where fingerprint alone is considered as safe. Nowhere but on smartphones. More, it violates the more basic and invariant rule of security : a code must be changeable.

    Don't extrapolate too fast though. BlackBerry is aware of that. So much the recommended scenario for proper solid implementation in enterprise is ...
    Fingerprint will only unlock personal data. For anything business : type your 6 digit code.
    Gimmicks (especially the optional kind) aka features sell devices. I have a device that has one and never use it, but it makes sense for device manufacturers to include these optional features.

    As implemented locally on devices, i can appreciate the convenience. Convenience is a big, big draw.
    Superfly_FR likes this.
    03-01-17 06:11 PM
  16. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    There's zero doubt about that
    I was more re:OP but it'll be foolish to state otherwise. It's just sometimes I fear so much convenience leads to ... Say, unexpected situations.
    Tre Lawrence likes this.
    03-01-17 06:57 PM
  17. Prem WatsApp's Avatar
    Myself, I like the fingerprint scanner and for me it adds an extra level of security on my device. Combined with a good PIN code, I haven't had any device security issues yet.
    Make sure you quickly change it from FP to PIN when the cops stop you... ;-)

    •   THISone, with the keys, hopefully coming soon to a phone store down unda... :-D   •
    03-02-17 12:08 AM
  18. keyboardweeb's Avatar
    Vkbs, wireless charging, videochat, heck... Netflix. All useless until folks get access to them.
    Pfft. I still think all these things are useless, maybe with the exception of wireless charging and video chat in certain situations. I sure wouldn't want to watch Netflix even on a giant like the iphone7+. I don't even really like watching video on my 10" tablet.

    On-topic: in the US, 5th amendment may cover passwords (personally I think it should and does, but the issue really hasn't been settled by the Supremes) but it definitely does not cover fingerprints (or iris scans, your facial features, or anything else biometric). So it doesn't matter if your fingerprint data is or isn't sent to the authorities--they can compel you to unlock your phone if it can be unlocked with just your fingerprint.
    03-02-17 07:41 AM
  19. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    Pfft. I still think all these things are useless, maybe with the exception of wireless charging and video chat in certain situations. I sure wouldn't want to watch Netflix even on a giant like the iphone7+. I don't even really like watching video on my 10" tablet.

    On-topic: in the US, 5th amendment may cover passwords (personally I think it should and does, but the issue really hasn't been settled by the Supremes) but it definitely does not cover fingerprints (or iris scans, your facial features, or anything else biometric). So it doesn't matter if your fingerprint data is or isn't sent to the authorities--they can compel you to unlock your phone if it can be unlocked with just your fingerprint.
    I don't know too many people who watch movies on a phone, but I know a lot that use the phone as a portal for streaming. That's why the Netflix app is so important to folks.

    At hotels, friends houses, church, use with projectors, etc, Netflix (or other services) can be useful.

    But in the mobile game, I think it makes sense to have EVERY option possible to appeal to the most people. Let them (the people) create their individual perfect devices.
    03-02-17 08:52 AM

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