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09-17-16 12:32 PM
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  1. sebstarr's Avatar
    The image shows 9900s so unclear which OS they speak of

    "Dutch police say that your special-issue BlackBerry isn't that private.

    The Netherlands Forensic Institute has confirmed a recent report that it's capable of scooping up encrypted data from PGP-equipped BlackBerry devices. It's not discussing the exact techniques involved, but it's relying on a tool from CelleBrite to get the job done. One possibility is that investigators are guessing the password based on a memory dump, although that normally requires yanking a memory chip off the phone's motherboard.
    If it's any consolation, police need physical access to crack these BlackBerrys. Their methods also aren't completely reliable (a small batch couldn't be cracked), and it's uncertain that this will work with every single PGP implementation. GhostPGP, for instance, claims that it's unaffected. All the same, this isn't very comforting if you bought a customized BlackBerry with the promise of airtight security.

    http://www.engadget.com/2016/01/11/p...ackberry-data/
    01-11-16 09:49 PM
  2. Al moon's Avatar
    i call bluff on this
    01-11-16 10:42 PM
  3. masterscarhead1's Avatar
    I'm calling bluff
    01-11-16 11:09 PM
  4. zocster's Avatar
    Not disclosing techniques
    01-11-16 11:12 PM
  5. stevec66's Avatar
    Pull the other leg it's got bells on it.

    Posted via CB10
    01-11-16 11:41 PM
  6. roadblochd's Avatar
    Had a friend who got in trouble with the police. They managed to get into his encrypted BlackBerry 7 device for the evidence they needed.

    Posted via CB10
    01-12-16 12:47 AM
  7. TCB on Z10's Avatar
    Unless this is no longer true for some strange reason, these police forces must have been working on it a LONG time: Peter Misek of the U.S. investment banking firm Jefferies says "We think it's NSA-proof," Misek told CBC's business program Lang & O'Leary Exchange. "That security is so good, it takes four million years on brute compute force to hack it."

    BB, Still the One
    bbnrs likes this.
    01-12-16 01:03 AM
  8. BeheGOD's Avatar
    Funny, I've encoutered the same post a couple of days/weeks back on tweakers.net, a dutch tech site.
    I've tipped crackberry/blaze about this, but never saw an article popping up about this.
    I don't think it is a bluff at all actually! But I'm also not surprised that I don't see the news comming through here, since it's "bad" news.
    Anyway, good that fellow forum members keep each other up to date without bias filtering the news first!
    01-12-16 04:41 AM
  9. rthonpm's Avatar
    The article is talking about those modified BlackBerry 7 handsets that are tied to a PGP infrastructure.

    Posted via CB10
    DaFoxGrey, web99, bungaboy and 1 others like this.
    01-12-16 04:44 AM
  10. sebstarr's Avatar
    The article is talking about those modified BlackBerry 7 handsets that are tied to a PGP infrastructure.

    Posted via CB10
    So does that place many enterprise or government users at risk? I wonder if it is an outdated OS before the last version of OS7?

    You still need access to the device to Crack it but nonetheless not good as the article is so general that it can be construed in mnay ways.
    01-12-16 07:21 AM
  11. crackbrry fan's Avatar
    So does that place many enterprise or government users at risk? I wonder if it is an outdated OS before the last version of OS7?

    You still need access to the device to Crack it but nonetheless not good as the article is so general that it can be construed in mnay ways.
    It's a "modded" device . They weren't or aren't able to Crack BlackBerry BBOS nor BlackBerry 10. Expect to see individuals trying to "MOD" the older devices out there. There are Millions of devices still in use.

    Posted via CB10
    01-12-16 08:06 AM
  12. pkcable's Avatar
    Cellebrite devices are not available to the general public, they are for law enforcement and carriers.


    PS They can examine the data in iphones, Androids and regular cell phones too! It's a tool for law enforcement. Also carriers use a cellebrite device to transfer your data when you get a new phone, it can connect just about any two phone together.
    Jonneh, bungaboy, Carjackd and 1 others like this.
    01-12-16 08:18 AM
  13. bobshine's Avatar
    Why would they want to spend so much resource cracking a BlackBerry when almost everyone uses IPhones nowadays ???

    Posted via CB10
    valer466 likes this.
    01-12-16 08:40 AM
  14. stevec66's Avatar
    Bobshine, makes a very good point, about the vast majority of people use iPhone and Android devices , is it only the criminal element in society use BlackBerry!!!!

    Myself I havent had a speeding ticket for a couple of years, touch wood.

    Posted via CB10
    01-12-16 09:59 AM
  15. Doggerz's Avatar
    So if you have an encrypted device and password protected with a great password and your phone is powered down when they take it off you, they can read everything just like you had no security at all?

    Was all this talk about cops not being able to force a person to let them search their phone a bunch of crap then?

    What if the phone were put in airplane mode before being turned off and had a great password and encryption? I mean if it's possible to secure laptops or whatever it seems like there must be a way to secure a smartphone. (?)

    Z30STA100-5 / 10.3.2.2876 / T-Mobile USA
    01-12-16 10:06 AM
  16. VinLou's Avatar
    Probably, but I thought article mentioned it had to be physical phone that was hacked and not just intercepting communication via other means. So the Dutch need to strong arm you

    No Shade Just Light!!! Z30 10.3.2.2639
    01-12-16 12:26 PM
  17. Bla1ze's Avatar
    Probably, but I thought article mentioned it had to be physical phone that was hacked and not just intercepting communication via other means. So the Dutch need to strong arm you

    No Shade Just Light!!! Z30 10.3.2.2639
    Right, you need physical access to the device and it needs to be one of the custom modded variations, some of which the methodology doesn't even apply to, among a ton of other variables such as whether or not the device was encrypted, had it's content protection turned on, etc. etc. On top of that, Cellebrite and Elcomsoft have been claiming this stuff for years. The only 'new' part here is the PGP-Modded stuff.

    BlackBerry | Cellebrite Mobile Forensics Blog

    http://www.cellebrite.com/Media/Defa...se%20Study.pdf

    http://www.cellebrite.com/Media/Defa...tion-Brief.pdf

    But you know, heaven forbid someone Google something before flying off the handle. Here's a video from 2012, as an example of how long some of this stuff has been claimed. Every few months Cellebrite and Elcomsoft issue a bunch of press releases touting the ability to pull forensic data from BlackBerry's (among other devices), Cellebrite even has a pretty webpage dedicated to BlackBerry. A bunch of sites pick up on it and then post, and there's a ton of hoopla for a few days then it disappears. Yadda, yadda, yadda. It's all feeling like Deja vu, the only difference, this time, is there's some interest in BlackBerry helped by the release of the Priv.


    Even The Register is poking a little fun - http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/01...ry_pgp_riddle/ and the kicker of it all really is, as BeheGOD noted, it's not even new news. It was initially reported back in December, so someone has been putting in work to get filtered back up to the top of the news cycle. That alone is pretty darn shady lol.

    Seriously, just Google 'Cellebrite hack iphone' or 'Cellebrite hack Android', you'll see essentially the same thing written over and over again and Elcomsoft is even worse because they go hardcore with pushing their agenda. And to be fair, I'm not saying the stuff doesn't work, I'm just saying it's nothing new and a bit of a shame that everyone else seems to help them push their crap whether it be knowingly or unknowingly. OK. I'm done. /rant.
    01-13-16 12:31 AM
  18. Originalloverman's Avatar
    Why would they want to spend so much resource cracking a BlackBerry when almost everyone uses IPhones nowadays ???

    Posted via CB10
    Lol hmm I wonder

    Posted via the CrackBerry App for Android
    01-13-16 11:07 AM
  19. eimacdude's Avatar
    From Dutch Police Claim They Can Crack Emails on Special Encrypted Blackberries
    break a series of encrypted emails held on Blackberrys modified by Canadian firm Phantom Secure
    So, don't buy your BlackBerry phones from shady third parties with government connections, and you'll be fine.
    3hb78ftg and anon(9878325) like this.
    01-13-16 01:32 PM
  20. LuxuryTouringZone's Avatar
    I'm somewhat skeptical about this. It'd be interesting (and terrible at the same time) to see them hack into a modern phone.
    01-13-16 08:37 PM
  21. TCB on Z10's Avatar
    Lol hmm I wonder

    Posted via the CrackBerry App for Android
    Simple. Because the people who count use BlackBerry.

    BB, Still the One
    anon(9878325) likes this.
    01-14-16 11:57 AM
  22. sebstarr's Avatar
    Nice to see a BlackBerry response of sorts

    Furthermore, there are no backdoors in any BlackBerry devices, and BlackBerry does not store and therefore cannot share BlackBerry device passwords with law enforcement or anyone else. In other words, provided that users follow recommended practices, BlackBerry devices remain as secure and private as they have always been.

    http://blogs.blackberry.com/2016/01/...gagement||BBM|
    01-14-16 12:50 PM
  23. BCITMike's Avatar
    If you have access to a backup, you can attempt brute force without penalization.

    If you read the recent article about collected metadata, it's not hard to find or figure out passwords. Leaked password hash databases have been making it easier and easier to match passwords. Password recovery questions, etc.

    Posted via CB10
    01-14-16 02:47 PM
  24. EncroChat's Avatar
    Is the use of PGP on a BlackBerry device safe or not?
    02-02-16 06:03 PM
  25. EncroChat's Avatar
    Well actually My conclusion is that it doesn't matter where you bought it from! Phones from known labels who deliver BlackBerry PGP devices are vulnerable also. The positive outcome of forensic investigation executed by Dutch Governement wouldn't be different if they investigate a similar device from a quality party.

    This is the worst nightmare of owners of a similar device
    Last edited by EncroChat; 02-02-16 at 06:11 PM. Reason: i have merged two comments
    02-02-16 06:08 PM
36 12

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