1. bakers211's Avatar
    Having trouble getting a definitive answer... How long are blackberry emails stored on the server? Yes, it is a blackberry email account, not another kind. The reason why i ask it because my wife is threatening a court order to pull phone, text and email records for our upcoming divorce. Ive talked to numerous Verizon techs and they all give different answers and they all start with "I think...". Ive heard anywhere from 2 days after they are deleted from the phone, 30 days and even 6 months. Anybody know?
    11-02-10 11:49 AM
  2. Fubaz's Avatar
    Are you running BES or BIS?

    are you talking about your blackberry.net email account?

    can you be a little more specific?

    Im pretty sure standard BIS has an autoaging feature of 30 days. As far as the correctness of that, I am not sure.. all the old documentation i could dig up was from BIS 2.0.

    Also, welcome to thr forums, and sorry for your hardship.
    Last edited by Fubaz; 11-02-10 at 12:01 PM.
    11-02-10 11:56 AM
  3. amazinglygraceless's Avatar
    The retention period is set by the carrier and they really are the only ones who
    can give you a definitive answer.

    One recent case though was that of Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick. The carrier was able
    to go back and retrieve messages and emails sent 8 years prior.
    11-02-10 11:59 AM
  4. tandaina's Avatar
    As Kwame found, if you don't want something to come back to haunt you, do NOT sent it electronically. It is up to your carrier, but there are ways to go back, nothing REALLY goes away.
    11-02-10 12:04 PM
  5. bakers211's Avatar
    I heard about that case... the phone was government owned so the texts and emails were stored for that reason. And yes, the email is a blackberry.net account. I guess i'm hoping that, since they have been deleted off my phone then they will also be gone from the server...
    11-02-10 12:04 PM
  6. pcgizmo#IM's Avatar
    II guess i'm hoping that, since they have been deleted off my phone then they will also be gone from the server...
    Not likely.
    11-02-10 12:06 PM
  7. bakers211's Avatar
    These servers must be huge... storing massive amounts of emails from millions of customers. Sounds unnessessary.
    11-02-10 12:10 PM
  8. bakers211's Avatar
    I still feel like there should be a "policy" somewhere that states how long the emails are stored... I cant believe how hard it is to find this out. Its also comical how privacy of the third party in my situation is disregarded... just because its "electronic communication".
    11-02-10 12:18 PM
  9. amazinglygraceless's Avatar
    You are very wrong on a lot of levels starting with who owns the phone. 20+ years
    as a governmental employee (Director level) I can tell you your assumptions are
    way off base.
    11-02-10 12:19 PM
  10. jlb21's Avatar
    As Kwame found, if you don't want something to come back to haunt you, do NOT sent it electronically. It is up to your carrier, but there are ways to go back, nothing REALLY goes away.
    Exactly.

    don't forget about backups. Somewhere along the line, the message data was at rest and was probably backed up to storage media.
    11-02-10 12:20 PM
  11. jlb21's Avatar
    Also, while eDiscovery legislation pertains specifically to corporate communications/data, this Wiki summary of it gives you an idea of the reach/scope of information/storage/difficulty in "deleting", etc......

    Electronic discovery - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    11-02-10 12:24 PM
  12. bakers211's Avatar
    You are very wrong on a lot of levels starting with who owns the phone. 20+ years
    as a governmental employee (Director level) I can tell you your assumptions are
    way off base.
    Are we talking abuot me?
    11-02-10 12:25 PM
  13. amazinglygraceless's Avatar
    Are we talking abuot me?
    Well yeah. You started the thread. Should I be addressing myself to someone else?
    11-02-10 12:45 PM
  14. bakers211's Avatar
    Well yeah. You started the thread. Should I be addressing myself to someone else?
    Actually, the thread has become about Kwame Kilpatrick and governement stuff. Mine is a simple question about data storage on a server and it has small civil implications, nothing more.
    11-02-10 12:48 PM
  15. amazinglygraceless's Avatar
    Actually, the thread has become about Kwame Kilpatrick and governement stuff. Mine is a simple question about data storage on a server and it has small civil implications, nothing more.
    And my and others answers have been that it is carrier determined (regardless
    of ownership or job title.)

    End of the day this rule applies: If you do not what to see it on a 2x2
    whiteboard in a court of law,

    DO NOT!

    PRESS!

    "SEND"
    11-02-10 12:54 PM
  16. bakers211's Avatar
    gotcha!
    11-02-10 01:01 PM
  17. pkcable's Avatar
    If you don't think it would be safe to appear on the front page of the NY Times then DON'T put it in an email!
    11-02-10 01:41 PM
  18. Reed McLay's Avatar
    There is an interesting item in Canada's news today, the government is re-introducing legislation for intercepting electronic communications. This the second try, the last one failed when the government melted down for the Olympics.

    Backgrounder - Investigating and Preventing Criminal Electronic Communications Act

    technologies that did not exist when the legal framework for interception was designed nearly 40 years ago.
    ...

    There is currently no legal requirement for telecommunications service providers to provide such information to authorities. As a result, the practices of releasing this information vary across the country: some service providers release the information immediately upon request; others provide it at their convenience, often following considerable delays; others insist that authorities first obtain a warrant. This lack of consistency and clarity can delay or block investigations.

    ...
    One of the consequences, we see in the pending legislation what they want to accomplish and where there are challenges regarding access and encryption.

    To the OP. If you compose and send through the .BlackBerry.net account, Research in Motion can be forced to disclose it when presented with a warrant. In practice, there is no requirement for them to maintain the data for long enough for LEO to request it, pending the new legislation changes.
    11-02-10 01:49 PM
  19. bakers211's Avatar
    I doubt i'd make the papers with my story... thanks for the advice. Didnt realize my parents were members on here.
    11-02-10 01:54 PM
  20. bakers211's Avatar
    I assumed that the time nessessary for a civil court order to "do its magic" would take some time... especially having to deal with corporations such as Verizon and Blackberry. I guess my only hope is that the process takes long enough that the emails expire after 30 days and are purged.
    On a side note... the content of the emails will have very little bearing on the divorce but it becomes an excuse to dredge up stuff...
    11-02-10 02:07 PM
  21. ocanyc's Avatar
    my wife is threatening a court order to pull phone, text and email records for our upcoming divorce
    She can do that? lol
    11-02-10 02:53 PM
  22. bakers211's Avatar
    She can do that? lol
    Thats what I'm figuring out...
    11-02-10 02:58 PM
  23. amazinglygraceless's Avatar
    Oh for heavens sake. Dude, if you sent it it is recoverable. PERIOD!!

    Posted from my phone at wapforums.crackberry.com
    11-02-10 05:52 PM
  24. bpgui's Avatar
    Like many have said, if you sent it, it is likely recoverable.

    That being said, I have subpoenaed Verizon for records of text messages for a case I was working on (I am an attorney). Verizon refused. I'm confident I could have forced the issue through the court, but it was a relatively low dollar case and the client directed me not to expend the time and expense to do so.

    BTW, I am amazed that no one has asked you about the content of the messages allegedly sent by you
    11-02-10 08:20 PM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD