01-04-12 05:34 PM
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  1. T
    Well, the T-Mobile info re Carrier IQ in the "My Account" application is revealing. It might not be buried so deep after all. Let's hope it isn't.
    12-02-11 08:15 PM
  2. Maestrodog's Avatar
    The good news is the lawsuits are flying and Congress is seizing upon with populist furor on the eve of an election year.

    All will be known very soon...
    12-02-11 08:17 PM
  3. mangcool's Avatar
    If you guys think about it, most apps that use your mobile network, collect some kind of data from your phone. What's different about CarrierIQ is that it runs without the user's consent nor permission. If CarrierIQ is, let's say, installed on our BlackBerrys, then that little "spyware" itself will ruin RIM's reputation of making secured mobile phones and servces.

    My .02? I don't think it's installed. Yes, the guy who discovered it says that this piece of software is installed on every BlackBerry OS. However, there's little or no evidence showing this is true. And if this is installed on the BlackBerry OS by default, it would be discovered way before since a lot of researchers and geeks have been digging BlackBerrys for security vulnerabilities. Also, I don't think the president would use a BlackBerry if that's the case in the first place. :P

    I think it is safe to say, CarrierIQ IS NOT installed on our BlackBerry smartphones (and tablets).

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    12-03-11 12:30 AM
  4. T
    ^You make some compelling points. I do hope you're right.
    12-03-11 01:41 AM
  5. youknwwho's Avatar
    I have something to ask. My 9650 have and App called Verizon PPT. Its the thing harm full to have or to remove ? I'm not on Verizon any way.
    12-03-11 02:44 AM
  6. steve911's Avatar
    Why would those governments who insisted that RIM give them access to the BES data not just force the carriers in their countries to install the software instead? It would of attracted much less publicity to what their government are doing. Or is RIM's security so strong that not even keystrokes can be captured when it's BES data?

    What was the solution that RIM gave them? and I wonder if any countries out there are utilizing this software for control of their population?
    12-03-11 02:52 AM
  7. grahamf's Avatar
    I'm betting that the Blackberry version is wrapped up in the carrier crapware trojan style. it may be in Telenav or Sprint Newsroom.

    Fortunately, all carriers can do is push a download link to your homescreen. I believe that if any BBs have CIQ on them, it's because the user installed one of those applications.
    12-03-11 02:59 AM
  8. T
    Why would those governments who insisted that RIM give them access to the BES data not just force the carriers in their countries to install the software instead? It would of attracted much less publicity to what their government are doing. Or is RIM's security so strong that not even keystrokes can be captured when it's BES data?

    What was the solution that RIM gave them? and I wonder if any countries out there are utilizing this software for control of their population?
    Someone pointed it out the other day. There was an instance a while back when it was discovered that the Arab carrier "Etislat" had pushed this type of spyware to its BIS users. A BES admin could block any third party app.
    Last edited by Tnis; 12-03-11 at 08:46 AM.
    12-03-11 08:35 AM
  9. T
    I'm betting that the Blackberry version is wrapped up in the carrier crapware trojan style. it may be in Telenav or Sprint Newsroom.

    Fortunately, all carriers can do is push a download link to your homescreen. I believe that if any BBs have CIQ on them, it's because the user installed one of those applications.
    And I wonder if the BlackBerry version of Carrier IQ might indeed be less "robust" as the leaked/released T-Mobile document says. Someone on another site pointed out that for a keylogger to work on BlackBerry, the application has to be in the foreground (i.e. visible).
    12-03-11 08:39 AM
  10. Maestrodog's Avatar
    If you guys think about it, most apps that use your mobile network, collect some kind of data from your phone. What's different about CarrierIQ is that it runs without the user's consent nor permission. If CarrierIQ is, let's say, installed on our BlackBerrys, then that little "spyware" itself will ruin RIM's reputation of making secured mobile phones and servces.

    My .02? I don't think it's installed. Yes, the guy who discovered it says that this piece of software is installed on every BlackBerry OS. However, there's little or no evidence showing this is true. And if this is installed on the BlackBerry OS by default, it would be discovered way before since a lot of researchers and geeks have been digging BlackBerrys for security vulnerabilities. Also, I don't think the president would use a BlackBerry if that's the case in the first place. :P

    I think it is safe to say, CarrierIQ IS NOT installed on our BlackBerry smartphones (and tablets).

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com

    I agree we should have found it by now, but for now I have to take Sprint's word when they say it's on all their phones and can't be removed. I don't think anyone has been reading my personal information, but I don't want it even stored anywhere, nor of course do I want the possibility to exist. Everyone knows the FBI had Microsoft put backdoors deep in their stuff.... unless we have a deep technical developer or insider chime in, we have to think it could be some kind of hidden coding or trojan type deal as some have suggested.

    As for the "president", they fought him tooth and nail and then finally souped up his 8850 with a load of encryption and who knows what else--all transmitted over heck knows what kind of secure bandwidth.

    Why do you think these pols are jumping onboard? Wouldn't be the first time someone got hacked in an election year, and they're all Blackberry people--at least anyone who knows anything.

    On the other hand, our own military and critical systems infrastructure is woefully unprepared for Chinese and Russian hacks. We've leaped headlong into IT but never properly dealt with the security side. Kinda like when we developed rifling but didn't change our formation tactics. Thus the carnage of The Civil War. You can't just adopt new technology without considering and addressing the risks.

    I agree this could be a tempest a teapot, but Trevor's video is all anyone ever needs to see that we need to hold these scum accountable and usher in a new time for mobile security.
    12-03-11 10:45 AM
  11. L395's Avatar
    This is no surprise and I believe that this form of "wiretapping" is sanctioned by the government and shared with many entrepreneurial endeavors as "inside trader information" is to a select company of people. It's actually legal if we look back to Bill Clinton's "Co-intelpro" law enhanced by Homeland Security and The Patriot Act. The government doesn't need any permissions regardless of any of the allow/deny options you may come across in searching for this hidden application(s). Unfortunately, I must try to delete my info on Password Keeper (if it's really possible) till we know for sure if Blackberry can patch any encroachments of CIQ.
    If we look to what Verizon is doing to meld all communications for broadband, cable, home phone, smartphone to one service, then we can predict that nothing shall be private. With the government at this time looking to seek national free broadband for everyone, I can see that there may be a mandate someday that all have to have a connection resembling a social security number. This is the direction of Google anyway. I'm not formally religious, but the "Mark of the Beast" may be just around the corner.
    12-03-11 11:28 AM
  12. Maestrodog's Avatar
    Indeed, I encourage everyone to use tools such as No Script, PeerBlock, Ghostery, Tor and many other free add ons that put a big cramp in the tracker's style.

    Google is a complete menace. Use Scroogle or The Pirate Bay Dancing to keep them partially in check, or other good/better search engines altogether. There are many. For the love of God, do not use google as a verb. Don't be a tool. Also, you'd have to be nuts to use gmail. Just forget them altogether.

    Here's a good Thom Hartmann piece with an EPIC rep on the Carrier IQ horror:

    12-03-11 12:37 PM
  13. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    Someone correct me if I am wrong, but I am not seeing how RIM is culpable in any way. Isn't it the carrier?
    12-03-11 01:15 PM
  14. avt123's Avatar
    Someone correct me if I am wrong, but I am not seeing how RIM is culpable in any way. Isn't it the carrier?
    Yea. RIM said they do not install the software and they do not authorize the installation of the software on their devices. This means the carriers are installing the software on BB devices if carrier IQ is on them. AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint have all confirmed they use CIQ software on their devices.

    According to some posters in this thread, CIQ is at a firmware level on Sprint devices. Not sure about AT&T and TMO. The Evo 3D shown is clearly sketchy, not sure how it is on a BB.
    12-03-11 01:23 PM
  15. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    I know it was on my stock EVO.
    12-03-11 01:29 PM
  16. avt123's Avatar
    Yea it is on all the Evos and I am guessing on all of the Sprint Android devices as well. I have heard it being on Samsung, HTC and LG devices but nothing about Moto yet. I would guess it is there too, but maybe not.
    12-03-11 02:07 PM
  17. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    It was discovered at XDA in February by a Samsung Epic ROM developer, IIRC.
    12-03-11 02:19 PM
  18. Maestrodog's Avatar
    Someone correct me if I am wrong, but I am not seeing how RIM is culpable in any way. Isn't it the carrier?
    Not culpable, but I expect them to take a leadership position in getting to the bottom of the whole thing, ensuring no wiretap laws have been broken, there are no security risks, etc. etc. These are their units and we buy them from carriers based more on their brand than the carrier brand. They should do more than protect themselves on this one or suffer further brand degradation.

    RIM's had a crushing year. Here's a chance for them to stick up for the little guy and reassert their total commitment and dominance in security, which is going to be a bigger and bigger and bigger and bigger issue for years and years to come.

    That said, I do look forward to bailing on Sprint. Carrier IQ themselves have said they don't understand why so much data is being collected, it's just supposed to be diagnostics. Sprint then uses software from providers who don't know what they're doing and are in over their heads. Everything else aside, that's game over for Sprint and me.
    12-03-11 02:22 PM
  19. ubizmo's Avatar
    Well, the T-Mobile info re Carrier IQ in the "My Account" application is revealing. It might not be buried so deep after all. Let's hope it isn't.
    I found it easily enough in the "My Account" app by going into Options>Device>Application Management, selecting that app, and inspecting the component modules. "CarrierIQ" was right there. I deleted the "My Account" app, which is regrettable, since it's an otherwise useful app. But I think everybody should delete it anyway, to send a clear message that we don't want apps with spyware.
    12-04-11 01:12 PM
  20. T
    I found it easily enough in the "My Account" app by going into Options>Device>Application Management, selecting that app, and inspecting the component modules. "CarrierIQ" was right there. I deleted the "My Account" app, which is regrettable, since it's an otherwise useful app. But I think everybody should delete it anyway, to send a clear message that we don't want apps with spyware.
    If I have an app like that which lives on my phone as a pushed crapware icon and Carrier IQ is built into it, is Carrier IQ working behind the scenes on my phone even though I've never installed or used the app? I mean, should I install it and then delete it or am I safe the way it is, unused?

    By the way, thanks for looking for it and sharing your findings as to its location. It's a relief to know that it's bundled in an app and probably not "hard-coded" into firmware and unremovable the way some are saying.
    12-04-11 01:31 PM
  21. ubizmo's Avatar
    If I have an app like that which lives on my phone as a pushed crapware icon and Carrier IQ is built into it, is Carrier IQ working behind the scenes on my phone even though I've never installed or used the app? I mean, should I install it and then delete it or am I safe the way it is, unused?

    By the way, thanks for looking for it and sharing your findings as to its location. It's a relief to know that it's bundled in an app and probably not "hard-coded" into firmware and unremovable the way some are saying.
    I'm no tech wizard, so I can't give you an authoritative answer. However, it seems to me that the module isn't there until you install the app. Now that I've deleted it, there's no sign of it on my 9900.

    If the situation is similar on your carrier, I'd leave it uninstalled. I think that should be sufficient.
    12-04-11 01:38 PM
  22. avt123's Avatar
    More CIQ info.

    Carrier IQ denies responsiblity for insecure log files, suggests manufacturers are to blame | The Verge

    CIQ has passed all the blame onto the manufacturers and carriers for misusing their software.
    12-04-11 01:50 PM
  23. Blacklac's Avatar
    It is on all T-Mo OS7 Blackberry's btw. This info was confirmed by a T-Mo document posted on N4BB.com

    http://n4bb.com/t-mobile-blackberry-7-devices-carrier-iq
    Last edited by Blacklac; 12-04-11 at 02:19 PM.
    12-04-11 02:16 PM
  24. T
    But see above. The good news is that on T-Mobile BlackBerries it's buried in a T-Mobile app ("My Account") which users can just delete.
    Jake2826 likes this.
    12-04-11 02:27 PM
  25. Blacklac's Avatar
    yup, just putting the info out there. I hadn't seen that posted yet about specific devices.
    12-04-11 02:32 PM
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