01-04-12 04:34 PM
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  1. avt123's Avatar
    I guess im confused, I just got a brand new HTC Titan from ATT with ATT and HTC Apps preloaded.
    I guess that means iOS and Nexus Android devices are the only ones without bloat. We'll see if VZW adds any of their crap to the Galaxy Nexus, but the GSM version has none of it.
    12-01-11 12:54 PM
  2. belfastdispatcher's Avatar
    So the only way CIQ could exist on a BB is in the form of an app that will be seen in App Management?

    Is that correct?
    12-01-11 12:56 PM
  3. T
    N8ter,
    RIM has made an official statement that they never put it on their devices nor do they authorize or have ever authorized carriers to do so. However, your company may do that or other big brother stuff as they see fit.

    So, for regular users, I believe we are clear of this one. Still, even BB is vulnerable if you download stuff to your phone from questionable sources.

    I suggest people consider using a PW for access to the phone and also for any dowloads. That way, no one can swipe your phone for a minute or two and then put it back after they downloaded malware.

    Most of us don't do any James Bond stuff but some people do this kind of stuff for fun so protect yourself with the following steps:

    1. Get a BlackBerry phone.
    2. Activate Passwords for access and downloads (eight or more number letter combos is recommended)
    3. Never download something from an unknown and trusted source.

    If you do this, (RIM has a 10 year track record/history of not being breached. Every other major platform has) you should be just fine and secure.
    Passwords are all great -- I use a strong one -- but they become irrelevant if Carrier IQ is transmitting the password to RIM or another party like the carrier or a government. If RIM and/or the carriers are kissing the US government's @$$, it's very possible the software wasn't installed or autorized by RIM or the carrier rather by some third party. I think we should contact and confront our carrier(s) about this in writing. I'll try as soon as I get some time. I paid Sprint almost $500 this month (including international calls), and I'd be pleased to pay it an etf and never another cent.
    12-01-11 12:57 PM
  4. mud314's Avatar
    I am so done with Google and their products. One thing is for them to use their own software, but not they are using others. What can we really expect as far as security/privacy from this company? As a friend of mine told me, nothing good can come out of something is the free. Specially with a co that is in it to make money. At first I told him he was nothing more than a conspiracy theorist but I am starting to see his point. They work just a bit to hard to provide services for everyone at no cost. Let's face it in this world of greed nothing will come w/o a price.
    Blacklac likes this.
    12-01-11 12:59 PM
  5. TheScionicMan's Avatar
    Actually WP7, like iOS, does not allow for bloatware to be installed on their devices like the rest of the lot does.

    Update: chpwn notes that initial research indicated that Carrier IQ's software may only be active when the iPhone is in diagnostic mode. In a blog post, chpwn confirms that, based on his initial testing, Apple has added some form of Carrier IQ software to all versions of iOS, including iOS 5. However, the good news is that it does not appear to actually send any information so long as a setting called DiagnosticsAllowed is set to off, which is the default. Finally, the local logs on iOS seem to store much less information than what has been seen on Android, limited to some call activity and location (if enabled), but not any text from the web browser, SMS, or anywhere else. We'll let you know when more details arise.
    Carrier IQ references discovered in Apple's iOS | The Verge
    12-01-11 01:03 PM
  6. avt123's Avatar
    I am so done with Google and their products. One thing is for them to use their own software, but not they are using others. What can we really expect as far as security/privacy from this company? As a friend of mine told me, nothing good can come out of something is the free. Specially with a co that is in it to make money. At first I told him he was nothing more than a conspiracy theorist but I am starting to see his point. They work just a bit to hard to provide services for everyone at no cost. Let's face it in this world of greed nothing will come w/o a price.
    This has nothing to do with Google though. It is not found on Nexus devices. Carrier IQ is not on AOSP. Blame the manufacturers. You are pointing your frustrations at the wrong company.
    12-01-11 01:08 PM
  7. T
    In the case of Sprint, I wonder if this comes package with the Navigation Sprint provides. When I went to install it, it came with some pretty stern RIM warnings about how the app is only provided as a convenience and could (like other apps) compromise privacy, security, etc. Naturally, I didn't install it.
    12-01-11 01:11 PM
  8. hootyhoo's Avatar
    I am so done with Google and their products. One thing is for them to use their own software, but not they are using others. What can we really expect as far as security/privacy from this company? As a friend of mine told me, nothing good can come out of something is the free. Specially with a co that is in it to make money. At first I told him he was nothing more than a conspiracy theorist but I am starting to see his point. They work just a bit to hard to provide services for everyone at no cost. Let's face it in this world of greed nothing will come w/o a price.
    This is an issue for most platforms and most carriers.

    But good job taking the opportunity to bash google.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    12-01-11 01:12 PM
  9. Blacklac's Avatar
    This has nothing to do with Google though. It is not found on Nexus devices. Carrier IQ is not on AOSP. Blame the manufacturers. You are pointing your frustrations at the wrong company.
    Is Android not part of the problem if the OS (made by Google) allows this type of software to be installed so deeply into the OS that you dont even see it or have the ability to remove it from the device itself? He can stick up for his own comments, but I didn't take what he said as blaming Google, simply stating "open" software is more prone to this type of thing, and he wished to stay away from such software/products. Thats how I took what he said atleast.

    But I agree, there are many at fault here.
    12-01-11 01:20 PM
  10. mud314's Avatar
    This is an issue for most platforms and most carriers.

    But good job taking the opportunity to bash google.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Aww did I just insult your fave company? Sorry about that, but then maybe they should also be more transparent on what they do. Let's face it google has a history of throwing their users in for a loop when it comes to privacy and it has been their model since day 1.
    12-01-11 01:25 PM
  11. avt123's Avatar
    Is Android not part of the problem if the OS (made by Google) allows this type of software to be installed so deeply into the OS that you dont even see it or have the ability to remove it from the device itself? He can stick up for his own comments, but I didn't take what he said as blaming Google, simply stating "open" software is more prone to this type of thing, and he wished to stay away from such software/products. Thats how I took what he said atleast.

    But I agree, there are many at fault here.
    Open or not, it is on other platforms. Are they as open as Android? No, so being open is not the problem. Carriers/manufacturers putting the software there is.

    Look at the video. The software is HTC branded and HTC denies it. HTC has their own source codes and kernels. Same as other manufacturers. You cannot point any blame at Google when they release the code and manufacturers/carriers can do as the please. Manufacturers can lock the software down on their own. Google provides the base. This is out of their hands.

    The carriers/manufacturers need to give us answers. Not Google. AOSP is free of this.

    It is not just open software that is prone to this. It is any software that the carriers/manufacturers can get their hands on.
    Last edited by avt123; 12-01-11 at 01:31 PM.
    12-01-11 01:28 PM
  12. mud314's Avatar
    I guess that means iOS and Nexus Android devices are the only ones without bloat. We'll see if VZW adds any of their crap to the Galaxy Nexus, but the GSM version has none of it.
    One can only hope that they don't. It really is a shame that the carriers install so much crap. Remember years ago when MSFT was in deep water over this crap? Why is it that carriers aren't? They go above and beyond. I remember my one week honeymoon with the HTC thunderbolt, awesome looking device, horrible battery life and man 21 pieces of bloatware.

    In my opinion, the carriers should dish out two different types of the same phone 1. with the bloatware at reduced price and a second phone with a stock OS. This way people can decide with their money. Why should you and I or anyone else that is willing to pay a higher price (if you are) be having to put up with bloatware?

    I remember that there was nothing I could do get CityID from running on my TB. After one week of owning that phone and having web pages render in full html code, random reboots (after the update that "supposedly" fixed it), 2-3 hours of battery life I said F it and took it back to VZ.
    12-01-11 01:33 PM
  13. mud314's Avatar
    Since when? AT&T manages to put their own bloat on WP7 devices.
    Interesting because my one friend who is a windows mobile lover has one and there is zero bloatware on it and he is also on ATT. I didn't think to ask him if it was the official rom or not, not sure if wp7 has the capability of doing that.
    12-01-11 01:37 PM
  14. DenverRalphy's Avatar
    Is Android not part of the problem if the OS (made by Google) allows this type of software to be installed so deeply into the OS that you dont even see it or have the ability to remove it from the device itself? He can stick up for his own comments, but I didn't take what he said as blaming Google, simply stating "open" software is more prone to this type of thing, and he wished to stay away from such software/products. Thats how I took what he said atleast.

    But I agree, there are many at fault here.
    Android isn't the problem as it's not like CIQ was slipped in after the fact on devices that didn't previously have it due to a security flaw.

    Yes, the openness makes it possible for manufacturers or carriers to put their custom software, but the fault lays solely on the manufacturer or carrier that put it on the device (in this case it seems to be resting predominately on the shoulders of AT&T and Sprint). But then too, on the flip side, it was the openness of Android that made it easier/possible for a developer to identify it, notify the community, and provide a fix to remove or isolate it.

    And to note... yes you can remove it. It's not ingrained into the OS.

    Aww did I just insult your fave company? Sorry about that, but then maybe they should also be more transparent on what they do. Let's face it google has a history of throwing their users in for a loop when it comes to privacy and it has been their model since day 1.
    Google has absolutely nothing to do with CIQ. As for transparency, it's exactly the transparency and openness of Google's product that made it possible for a developer of the community to identify the culprit.
    12-01-11 01:38 PM
  15. avt123's Avatar
    One can only hope that they don't. It really is a shame that the carriers install so much crap. Remember years ago when MSFT was in deep water over this crap? Why is it that carriers aren't? They go above and beyond. I remember my one week honeymoon with the HTC thunderbolt, awesome looking device, horrible battery life and man 21 pieces of bloatware.
    Yep this is the case with all Android devices besides Nexus devices (so far). Anything that doesn't come straight from Google is subject to carrier garbage and manufacturer bloat.

    In my opinion, the carriers should dish out two different types of the same phone 1. with the bloatware at reduced price and a second phone with a stock OS. This way people can decide with their money. Why should you and I or anyone else that is willing to pay a higher price (if you are) be having to put up with bloatware?
    I agree. But it would just be better for the carriers to not have any of this crap on the devices. Allow a portal in the App Market to download their garbage. Or simply allow us to delete it without going through hoops.

    I remember that there was nothing I could do get CityID from running on my TB. After one week of owning that phone and having web pages render in full html code, random reboots (after the update that "supposedly" fixed it), 2-3 hours of battery life I said F it and took it back to VZ.
    CityID pissed me off to no end. I couldn't wait for the DX to get rooted/ROMs so I was able to delete it. My mother has a normal Samsung feature phone and she freaks out all the time about it. Always texting me to see if there is a way to turn it off, but there isn't.
    12-01-11 01:38 PM
  16. akaquietstorm's Avatar
    I don't think this has anything to do with RIM, Google and Apple. I assume if the company is called CarrierIQ it is for the carrier to use at its discretion on their network.
    12-01-11 01:42 PM
  17. grahamf's Avatar
    Your service books are from your carrier.
    Your service books are carrier specific, but are created and approved by RIM.
    12-01-11 02:07 PM
  18. avt123's Avatar
    12-01-11 02:20 PM
  19. balth's Avatar
    It's been a long time since I've posted, mainly because my other posts were about stripping bbos down and removing languages from presigned cods.

    What I will say is that while making custom firmware (hybrids) for my girlfriend, I noticed carrieriq being referenced without even opening the cod as a container(zip) (you can view them in notepad). I did not know what it was so I never said anything(I was looking for languages and media/resource data within cods to remove).

    Point is, it's there.
    Anyone actually looked into the os to see if it's there?
    12-01-11 02:29 PM
  20. avt123's Avatar
    12-01-11 02:36 PM
  21. Xterra2's Avatar
    Happy to see that blackberry is exempted
    12-01-11 02:53 PM
  22. Umm Yeah's Avatar
    I guess im confused, I just got a brand new HTC Titan from ATT with ATT and HTC Apps preloaded.
    It can be and is installed on WP7 phones by the carriers. What you can do on WP7 that you can't do on unrooted Android phones is just delete the bloatware applications and they won't return. On my 9850, I hid them but they kept reappearing until I moved them all to a folder and then hid the folder. WP7 is closer to iOS on the bloatware prevention front but we'll see if it remains so if the OS becomes more popular and carriers have more incentive to make sure you can't delete/hide their bloatware.
    12-01-11 03:14 PM
  23. T
    Happy to see that blackberry is exempted
    Where does it say that? And if so, is BlackBerry excluded even on the carriers that use Carrier IQ(like Sprint)?
    12-01-11 03:17 PM
  24. belfastdispatcher's Avatar
    Before anybody has a hear attack remember BB has a native instant messaging app that sometimes comes with the OS called ICQ, don't get them confused lol
    newcollector likes this.
    12-01-11 03:27 PM
  25. SRR500's Avatar
    Before anybody has a hear attack remember BB has a native instant messaging app that sometimes comes with the OS called ICQ, don't get them confused lol
    I looked through my service books and saw that one and about had a fit. A quick google search set my mind at ease.
    12-01-11 05:47 PM
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