1. scott.slater's Avatar
    So I was going through CES news and came across some news of an Android Emulator for Windows 8 called BlueStacks. Of course, it is touted as "innovative", "good move", etc. but when RIM announces something simliar it is bad news, what gives?

    I can't wait for RIM to start powering our cars, mobile devices, etc., so that people can see what real innovation is.
    Last edited by scott.slater; 01-10-12 at 11:18 AM.
    kbz1960 likes this.
    01-10-12 10:38 AM
  2. Rickroller's Avatar
    I wonder if it will take a year to get it running on Windows 8 as well?
    01-10-12 10:48 AM
  3. Sith_Apprentice's Avatar
    It also appears it will run all (or most all) Android apps without the same limitations as for the Playbook. I have a sneaking suspicion this is part of the licensing deal that MSFT has with the manufacturers now haha.
    01-10-12 10:50 AM
  4. scott.slater's Avatar
    It also appears it will run all (or most all) Android apps without the same limitations as for the Playbook. I have a sneaking suspicion this is part of the licensing deal that MSFT has with the manufacturers now haha.
    Actually, it only has access to the Amazon Android apps.

    And yes, it will be about a year before it is fully available for Windows. When was it announced that the Playbook would play Android apps?
    01-10-12 10:59 AM
  5. kbz1960's Avatar
    It's an app player and not by MS. Same concept taken from RIM but maybe done better?
    01-10-12 11:00 AM
  6. Dapper37's Avatar
    This is a little vindication for RIM. Not to give them any credit of course.
    I'm not going to read that much into it to think, MS has something special cooking with the manufactuers beyond build on my platform and I wont sue!
    James Nieves likes this.
    01-10-12 11:01 AM
  7. Rickroller's Avatar
    Actually, it only has access to the Amazon Android apps.

    And yes, it will be about a year before it is fully available for Windows. When was it announced that the Playbook would play Android apps?
    I think Amazon has access to almost all the Android apps anyways though don't they?

    March 24th, 2011
    RIM adds Android app support to BlackBerry PlayBook via 'optional app player' -- Engadget
    01-10-12 11:18 AM
  8. Sith_Apprentice's Avatar
    It says over 400k apps, thats pretty much the entire catalogue isnt it?
    01-10-12 11:21 AM
  9. scott.slater's Avatar
    It says over 400k apps, thats pretty much the entire catalogue isnt it?
    That's not the point.

    The Android Apps for BlackBerry are not tied to another market (like Amazon), they are independent.
    01-10-12 11:28 AM
  10. n8ter#AC's Avatar
    That's the issue. They are independent. Being able to tie into an app store like google or amazon is a huge advantage. Developers don't have to release an apk outside of those two, either.


    Sent from my iPod touch using Tapatalk
    01-10-12 02:17 PM
  11. Sith_Apprentice's Avatar
    That's the issue. They are independent. Being able to tie into an app store like google or amazon is a huge advantage. Developers don't have to release an apk outside of those two, either.


    Sent from my iPod touch using Tapatalk
    The difference between releasing to two and to three is very little. Especially if the port process works easily. The problem is there are so many apps that will not work because the full version of android is not available on the Playbook. This cuts your potential apps by a wide margin (lets just say 50%). Gives you 200k apps now possible. Those apps need to be converted, and even though companies are batch converting them, this reduces it further. Lets take another 50% off the top. 100k apps plus the existing 50k or so (guess) apps RIM alreadyhas in their market. Total of 150k apps. Looks pretty negative if you look at it that way.However, from RIM's point of view, this is a relatively easy way to TRIPLE (again pure guess) their number of apps. Once you get that ball rolling, itll pick up speed.
    01-10-12 03:05 PM
  12. scott.slater's Avatar
    Well, Microsoft nor RIM really want these concepts to be to strong anyway. They want applications built for their OS's, not ported.

    I wouldn't be suprised to see both of these companies actually getting stronger in the next couple years in the mobile sector. Android is so unstable and fragmented that each manufacturer is going to end up pretty much having their own OS anyway. And with Google's purchase of Motorola Mobility, I wouldn't be surprised to see less open source development in the future as now they have an actual product to sell instead of just providing a market/OS/content/etc.

    Anyway, I for one think that the market is going to see a major shakeup again very soon like we saw in 2007, and not everyone is going to like it.
    01-10-12 05:00 PM
  13. swyost's Avatar
    It says over 400k apps, thats pretty much the entire catalogue isnt it?
    Actually, they promise access to 400K apps. It will actually run about 30 demo apps in the present tense. It is alpha software for the x86 version of Windows (Windows 7 to be specific) that they are now prematurely porting to the x86 version of the Windows 8 beta. A beta, BTW, that has not even been locked down yet. A good question is why one would want to run crappy android apps on an expensive x86 Windows 7 tablet, when you can run the actual x86 applications of which they are knock offs. Alternatively, I guess people really want to play angry birds on their generally $1000+ business tablets. Of course, it will have to be recoded for the ARM/tablet version of Windows 8 which is still completely under wraps. Even at CES, Microsoft was still focussing Windows 8 demos on AMD Fusion tablets....
    01-22-12 02:11 AM
  14. kraski's Avatar
    Actually, they promise access to 400K apps. It will actually run about 30 demo apps in the present tense. It is alpha software for the x86 version of Windows (Windows 7 to be specific) that they are now prematurely porting to the x86 version of the Windows 8 beta. A beta, BTW, that has not even been locked down yet. A good question is why one would want to run crappy android apps on an expensive x86 Windows 7 tablet, when you can run the actual x86 applications of which they are knock offs. Alternatively, I guess people really want to play angry birds on their generally $1000+ business tablets. Of course, it will have to be recoded for the ARM/tablet version of Windows 8 which is still completely under wraps. Even at CES, Microsoft was still focussing Windows 8 demos on AMD Fusion tablets....
    There's at least one good reason for running Android apps. Most Win software doesn't play well with tablets.. I have an Asus Win7 tablet PC. Most Win software won't resize switching from portrait to landscape. And, in tablet mode, only the programs that will recognize stylus or finger as a mouse pointer will have any real usability. Those are two areas where stuff written for tablets is ahead of real Win software.
    01-22-12 03:52 AM
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