06-05-19 01:16 PM
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  1. bb10adopter111's Avatar
    So how many people who are that busy utilize their phones for such communication? I think the vast majority move to their computer. This is an outlier.
    It's definitely an outlier, for obvious reasons:

    1) Many, if not most, senior executives in organizations I see are indeed that busy, but that's less than. 0.1% of all users. 2) Many of those executives work in environments that don't prioritize writing in communications. So, it's probably 0.1 *0. 001of users who would value a focus on email work flow.

    Of this (very rough estimate) of one in ten thousand users, most don't have any experience of using anything but Android or iOS, so they just accept what they have, then "move to their computer" because their phones aren't great at high volume email.

    That's kind of my point. The original BlackBerry users were primarily senior leaders who needed email 10-16 hours a day while away from their desks in meetings and traveling. The ONLY use for their BlackBerrys was work communications, as they weren't even able to load personal email accounts. So, the phone's systems and applications were designed for that work flow.

    Today, there's no market for a phone that exclusively prioritizes work communications, and the Android and iOS teams don't even support that work flow because it's not what drives revenue. So, their email use cases are much less intense than those of vintage BlackBerry users like me.

    Being an outlier in terms of intensity for a service (email) that does not make developers any money means that Android and iOS don't give a damn about my problems and it shows. That's the whole point I was making in the first place, and why I continue to use an older system that was designed for my use case.

    Posted with my trusty Z10
    06-05-19 06:02 AM
  2. Emaderton3's Avatar
    It's definitely an outlier, for obvious reasons:

    1) Many, if not most, senior executives in organizations I see are indeed that busy, but that's less than. 0.1% of all users. 2) Many of those executives work in environments that don't prioritize writing in communications. So, it's probably 0.1 *0. 001of users who would value a focus on email work flow.

    Of this (very rough estimate) of one in ten thousand users, most don't have any experience of using anything but Android or iOS, so they just accept what they have, then "move to their computer" because their phones aren't great at high volume email.

    That's kind of my point. The original BlackBerry users were primarily senior leaders who needed email 10-16 hours a day while away from their desks in meetings and traveling. The ONLY use for their BlackBerrys was work communications, as they weren't even able to load personal email accounts. So, the phone's systems and applications were designed for that work flow.

    Today, there's no market for a phone that exclusively prioritizes work communications, and the Android and iOS teams don't even support that work flow because it's not what drives revenue. So, their email use cases are much less intense than those of vintage BlackBerry users like me.

    Being an outlier in terms of intensity for a service (email) that does not make developers any money means that Android and iOS don't give a damn about my problems and it shows. That's the whole point I was making in the first place, and why I continue to use an older system that was designed for my use case.

    Posted with my trusty Z10
    You make great points. I was referring to users here commenting but there are still many professionals that have your type of work flow. I do miss many features of BlackBerry 10, but they were more for convenience than anything else for myself.
    06-05-19 06:39 AM
  3. Dunt Dunt Dunt's Avatar
    So how many people who are that busy utilize their phones for such communication? I think the vast majority move to their computer. This is an outlier.
    Majority.... don't even have a computer. A smartphone is their first "computer" in many markets.

    And even here in the US, I know many that no longer have a home computer or even a tablet.... their phone is everything. I have a laptop that hasn't been used in eight months, as it got packed away after the hurricane here. Neither my wife or my daughter that lives with us has had need of it over their phones or ipads. Me I have a Surface Pro tablet which is a computer all on it's own, for home use. But yeah at work I stick with a desktop. Even when I'm out of the office I mostly wait till I get back..., but I think that is the outlier in today's world of over two billion smartphone owners.
    06-05-19 08:10 AM
  4. bb10adopter111's Avatar
    Majority.... don't even have a computer. A smartphone is their first "computer" in many markets.

    And even here in the US, I know many that no longer have a home computer or even a tablet.... their phone is everything. I have a laptop that hasn't been used in eight months, as it got packed away after the hurricane here. Neither my wife or my daughter that lives with us has had need of it over their phones or ipads. Me I have a Surface Pro tablet which is a computer all on it's own, for home use. But yeah at work I stick with a desktop. Even when I'm out of the office I mostly wait till I get back..., but I think that is the outlier in today's world of over two billion smartphone owners.
    That's an important point. 95%+ of smartphone users in the high-tech countries, and probably 99%+ in developing countries value the overall level of flexibility and convenience of their devices, which let them connect to people, ideas, and information that has been crafted moderated and curated for them by social networks and media company's.

    For these users their iOS and Android devices are their primary connection to each other and the Internet. And many of them need all the help they can get.

    In my experience, fewer than 20% of people in the US are even competent at Google searches for anything much more complicated than "best pizza in NY." They don't use any Boolean logic or even quotation marks, and they add confusing, mispelled, or irrelevant terms to their searches.

    Sometimes we forget that email and the World Wide Web were developed by a bunch of Ph.Ds at MIT, U. Cal Berkeley, CERN, etc. as a means to communicate more effectively for research and archiving human knowledge. The whole world uses these tools now, but many people don't understand them and struggle to use them effectively. They prefer TV channels and just want a handful of entertaining and reliable feeds!
    06-05-19 10:24 AM
  5. chain13's Avatar
    So how many people who are that busy utilize their phones for such communication? I think the vast majority move to their computer. This is an outlier.
    My point is, it's doable in android. Whether the user use it or not, the feature is there.
    06-05-19 01:16 PM
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