1. TodWulff's Avatar
    Ok, folks, I am somewhat new to the Blackberry and RIM's OS.

    I have played in the embedded micros world for some time, from a hobbyist's perspective, coding in ASM, and other languages. I have never really dabbled with the higher level OS', however, except for gaining some exposure to the win32 world.

    What I am struggling with is the Memory Model that Blackberrys employ, from a user's perspective.

    Possessing enough knowledge to realize that there is only a fixed set of resources that a handheld computing device can possess, I went in search of some memory management tools.

    I have tried out many: MemoryUp, MemoryBooster, Aerize Optimizer, Quickpull, etc.

    Each seems to have it's own set of features and what not.

    What I am finding really frustrating is that there is not a single instance where two of the tools reported similar results. I am finding that I am even more confused than I had previously thought I was when I started this endeavor.

    This is only compounded by delving into the escreen JVM management UI and seeing yet another figure quantified for memory that contrasts all of the others pretty sharply.

    I have an 8350i. The only known is that the device's literature and many websites report that it has 128M of memory. I presume that it is flash that is being quantified by that figure.

    Does anyone know of a reputable reference that would clearly explain what the memory model is for the device (ROM/Flash/Ram), the OS, and the JVM, so that I can get my gray matter wrapped around what each of these tools might be useful for?

    Thanks, in advance.

    -t
    09-18-10 09:14 PM
  2. Fubaz's Avatar
    Beginning BlackBerry Development - Google Books



    there are some interesting nuggets in there that might help you understand a little bit more about how blackberrys work

    and I am sorry you have a 8350i
    09-18-10 09:18 PM
  3. TodWulff's Avatar
    Thanks, Fubaz, for the pointer. Book d/l'g now.

    ...and I am sorry you have a 8350i
    Yes, I hear ya. I work for a company that is in the Aircraft Service Industry. It seems that companies that perform services are the last die-hards for the iDEN Direct Connect platform. Eventually we will all migrate away from DC, but only when there is a viable alternative out there. I have seen some recent rumblings on alternative hybrid units. Only time will tell...

    Thanks again. Take care.

    -t
    09-18-10 11:53 PM
  4. TodWulff's Avatar
    and I am sorry you have a 8350i
    LOL. The 8350i died (display related - it had been dropped one to many times). I got a replacement (refurb) and it died in a couple of weeks - symptoms consistent with a flash-memory issue.

    I went to the distributor and they ended up getting wtih Sprint and they offered a free upgrade to the 8530. Since IDEN is going away at the end of next year, and we (as a company) are slowly migrating to CDMA devices, I went for it.

    I am so glad I did. The device is MUCH better...

    -t
    08-10-11 10:02 AM
  5. dkonigs's Avatar
    BlackBerry devices basically have 3 kinds of memory:
    1) RAM
    2) "Application memory" - where the OS and apps are installed
    3) Mass storage - where you keep your media files, etc.

    Also, I've never seen any real proof that those "memory booster" apps are anything more than snake oil. The BlackBerry API only gives you the ability to gather global memory statistics, and to tell the Java garbage-collector to run. (Maybe they could also trigger the built-in memory cleaner app, which can free up other things, but all in all it doesn't make that big of a difference.)
    08-10-11 10:16 AM
  6. blue81to's Avatar
    BlackBerry devices basically have 3 kinds of memory:
    1) RAM
    2) "Application memory" - where the OS and apps are installed
    3) Mass storage - where you keep your media files, etc.

    Also, I've never seen any real proof that those "memory booster" apps are anything more than snake oil. The BlackBerry API only gives you the ability to gather global memory statistics, and to tell the Java garbage-collector to run. (Maybe they could also trigger the built-in memory cleaner app, which can free up other things, but all in all it doesn't make that big of a difference.)
    Isn't application memory stored as RAM?

    Would it be true to say that the OS7 devices also have 256MB of RAM dedicated to the GPU? So that memory is a little different since it can only be used by the GPU for graphics.


    Here is an interesting article that explains how some of the memory for apps can be saved to the media storage. But only resource memory, not actual code memory.
    Now that the BlackBerry 9900 and 9810 have been out in Canada for a few days, there has been some confusion about app memory on the device. Its advertised to have 768 MB of RAM, but theres only 189 MB of memory available for applications, which is entirely separate from the on-board storage (which varies by BlackBerry) and the microSD memory card. 189 MB doesnt seem like a lot, especially if youre used to bigger apps on Android and iPhone, so I pestered RIM about it here at the BBM Apps Hackathon developer event in New York, and they provided me with a lengthy, comprehensive answer.

    The 189 MB of free space refers to the application memory space, an area carved out of the eMMC where all the usual security checks are put in for apps i.e. this is the space to which actual application COD files are installed. Practically speaking, if you look through the App World catalogue, youll find that few apps exceed 2 MB in size and most are less than 1 MB in size. On BlackBerry, most apps simply dont need much space. If you take Foursquare as an example, the app on BlackBerry is 790 KB where its at least triple that size on other major platforms, and arguably, with a richer feature set on BlackBerry.

    The maximum size for an app is theoretically about 14-16 MB (7-8 MB of code, 7-8 MB of additional data [could be images, audio files, etc basically, anything that isnt Java code]). This is documented here: The maximum size of a BlackBerry smartphone applic... - BlackBerry Support Community Forums

    The only argument for larger memory space is 3D games. But, per the max app size limit, 7 MB for data is too small for them anyway (many games have 50 MB or more of images, textures, audio, etc). You could go beyond that 7 MB data limit via a series of libraries, but then youre starting to take a large chunk out of that 189 MB. As such, for full featured 3D titles like 3D Roller Coaster Rush Jurassic 2, we worked with the vendor to download the game data separate from the COD files for the game logic. More specifically, from App World, the user will be able to download the COD files for the app, which make up the core game logic. This download is only a few MBs in size / only consumes a very small portion of the users available application memory. When running the game for the first time, the game will then download all the rest of its game files, be it images, textures, audio, or whatever else. This download is done in a manner that is cost-sensitive to the users data plan, using WiFi only, which is especially relevant for users who are not on unlimited data plans or for users who live in regions where data rates are such that 50 MB downloads over carrier networks are not practical. The downloaded game files are then saved to the users regular media storage, allowing the app to be as graphically rich as it wishes, without negatively impacting the users available application memory space.

    So, there you have it. Im no developer, so have no idea if this set-up makes any more sense than on any other platforms, but it is a bit reassuring if youve been freaking about only being able to get 189 MB-worth of apps onto the new BlackBerry devices.
    RIM explains app memory in OS 7 BlackBerry devices
    Can OS5 and OS6 devices store part of the apps resources as media storage in a way similar to OS7 devices?

    This is an explanation of app memory.
    <H2>Question</H2>



    What is the maximum size of a BlackBerry smartphone application?
    <H2>Answer</H2>



    BlackBerry smartphone applications are compiled into the .cod file format. The maximum size of an individual COD file is 128 KB. This number includes a maximum limit of 64 KB for application data (compiled code) and 64 KB for resource data. (For example, images and files.)



    If an application is larger than the 128 KB limit (64 KB of application data and 64 KB of resource data), sibling COD files can be created and packaged into a single main COD file. Sibling COD files are a series of COD files that are suffixed with -#, where # is incremented for each sibling COD file. These sibling COD files are then packaged into the main COD file following the basic ZIP structure. The sibling COD files adhere to the 128 KB (64 KB + 64 KB) size limit. To determine if your application contains sibling COD files, you can attempt to open the COD file with WinZip. If the COD file contains sibling COD files, you can open, view or extract the sibling COD files in the same way as a ZIP file.



    The limit for the number of sibling COD files that can exist within a single application is 127. This means that the maximum theoretical size limit for an application would be 16256 KB, which consists of 8128 KB of application data and 8128 KB of resource data. There is some overhead to this value, which brings the actual maximum size limit closer to 14000 KB. The actual maximum size for an application will vary slightly based on the application's contents.



    It is not possible for either data type (application or resource) to make use of unused space of another data type, meaning resource data cannot use application data space even if the application data is well under the limit.
    The maximum size of a BlackBerry smartphone applic... - BlackBerry Support Community Forums
    I've never had a blackberry before so I was confused about blackberry memory partitioning. My iPhone 3g only has 128MB of RAM but I have a few GB worth of apps stored on it because apps can be saved directly to flash storage where media is stored. BBOS doesn't allow app code to be stored that way for security reasons I think.

    The original iPhone and iPhone 3G have 8 GB (gigabytes) or 16 GB of flash memory for permanent storage of songs, videos, apps, pictures, operating system files, etc. This flash memory is similar to the hard disk space on your PC, or the space available on a USB flash disk and cannot be used as the computational RAM (random access memory) needed to run the operating system and applications. The iPhone and iPhone 3G have 128 MB (megabytes) of RAM used by the OS and applications in order to run. The processor in the original iPhone models runs at 412 MHz (megahertz).

    The iPhone 3G S, released in June of 2009, has 8, 16 or 32 GB of flash memory and 256 MB of RAM. The new 3G S processor runs at 600 MHz.
    How much memory does an iPhone have
    08-21-11 10:43 AM
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