1. bbjdog's Avatar
    COMPANY NEWS ALERT
    How I suffered horribly from SLAD (Smartphone-Loss Anxiety Disorder) (RTGAM)

    Michael Babad

    These are stories Report on Business is following Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2014.

    Follow Michael Babad and The Globe's Business Briefing on Twitter.

    Mobile blues

    Along with everything else that?s probably wrong with me, I?ve suffered of late from something dubbed Smartphone-Loss Anxiety Disorder.

    I?m just back today after a couple of weeks of staycation, a two-week period of rest, relaxation and ? angst. The latter is because my smartphone died in the middle of my holiday, leaving me in a state of panic.

    Smartphone-Loss Anxiety Disorder has actually been documented by Canadian researchers, though their study looks at the fear and threat of loss rather than the actual loss. In my case, having suffered a few days without mine, it was a full-on disease.

    I love my BlackBerry Q10, and I couldn?t live without it. Or so I thought.

    The Saturday night before last, my BlackBerry stopped working.

    And because it?s not actually mine ? it?s The Globe?s ? I had to decide whether to drive downtown through Toronto?s ugly construction-stalled traffic or live a week without it. Surely I could go one week, I told myself, a decision that lasted exactly one day.

    By Sunday night I decided I?d take it in to Eunice, our BlackBerry wizard.

    So I e-mailed her Monday morning, then phoned her for good measure, to make sure she was in. Eunice told me she?d e-mail me when it was fixed, and that it would probably take a couple of days.

    That period was hell.

    From The Globe?s remote e-mail system, I sent messages to everyone I thought would actually care that I was out of touch.

    I checked my e-mail remotely often, and my voicemail from a landline. You know, in case the doctor or the bank had left a message.

    I had a phantom buzz near my heart, and I envied all the people I saw walking with their eyes glued to their smartphones.

    I had to set the alarm clock on my dresser, rather than using the alarm on my BlackBerry. I had to ask people the time of day. I had to look up phone numbers. I even had to write myself notes on paper. With a pen.

    All of which is like making coffee in a percolator. Or actually having to insert your key in the car door.

    While driving, I kept my eye out for payphones just in case I needed one. Which is sort of like when you?re stuck in traffic, terrified and wondering where you can find a bathroom should you need to pee.

    As it turns out, I was feeling what others experience just because of the threat of losing a smartphone, according to researchers at Hamilton?s McMaster University.

    In their study, published in the International Journal of Mobile Communications, Professor Yufei Yuan of McMaster?s DeGroote School of Business, Professor Emeritus Norm Archer and PhD candidate Zhiling Tu built a ?user behaviour model? on coping with the threat or fear of loss.

    ?Due to the convenience of mobility, wireless communication and information processing power, individuals frequently carry mobile devices with valuable data assets wherever they go,? the researchers write.

    ?Cellphone users may store personal contacts and private pictures in their mobile phones. Professors may store their academic works such as lecture notes, papers, and manuscript in their laptops,? they add.

    ?Moreover, more and more companies have adopted BYOD (bring-your-own-device) policies which allow employees to bring their own devices to work and connect them to the corporate network ? Employees may load confidential customer information or working materials onto their mobile devices. While these compact mobile devices bring many benefits to users, they can easily get lost or stolen.?

    The McMaster researchers, by the way, didn?t use the term Smartphone-Loss Anxiety Disorder. That was coined by others who have cited the study, and its name fit me perfectly.

    Finally, I e-mailed Eunice again on Thursday morning, and phoned again, too, and a few hours later she told me she got me a new BlackBerry, the old one having been sent for repairs.

    So downtown I went, again, and I can?t tell you the relief that swept over me when I got the device back in my hands.

    No biggie that I had to set it up the way I like it, all over again. The only problem I had was using Bluetooth to again pair it with the device in my car.

    It didn?t seem as simple as the first time, and, for the life of me, I couldn?t get it working.

    I didn?t want to call Eunice again ? she?d had enough of me. And if Canada Post could turn a profit in an era of e-mail, surely I could figure out Bluetooth.

    So ? I read the manual.

    Discovering my mistake, I went out to the car and, sitting in my driveway, got it working.

    And phoned my wife in the family room.

    Posted via CB10
    09-02-14 08:35 AM
  2. bbmtna's Avatar
    Ha! I just gave this a read as it came up on my twitter feed

    Posted via CB10
    09-02-14 08:38 AM
  3. anon(2313227)'s Avatar
    This is probably the same for all smartphone. With iPhone being as fragile as they are, one would assume that they(as a collective) experience this daily.
    09-02-14 08:45 AM
  4. bbmtna's Avatar
    This is probably the same for all smartphone. With iPhone being as fragile as they are, one would assume that they(as a collective) experience this daily.
    Yeah I think that was the original intent. The author simply spoke from experience while using a Q10. The thread title could be tweaked.

    Posted via CB10
    09-02-14 09:17 AM
  5. OTCHRussell's Avatar
    I guess that's me! I call my husband from the garage to see if he already checked the mail!

    We actually use our smartphones somewhat like an intercom or Walkie - Talkie. Remember those? Great for finding your spouse in Costco. Great for sending me a shopping list while you are at home and I'm in the supermarket.
    Etc, etc, etc.
    My Z10 and Q10 are indispensable.

    Posted via my Q10 or Z10
    bbmtna likes this.
    09-02-14 10:05 AM
  6. bbmtna's Avatar
    I guess that's me! I call my husband from the garage to see if he already checked the mail!

    We actually use our smartphones somewhat like an intercom or Walkie - Talkie. Remember those? Great for finding your spouse in Costco. Great for sending me a shopping list while you are at home and I'm in the supermarket.
    Etc, etc, etc.
    My Z10 and Q10 are indispensable.

    Posted via my Q10 or Z10
    Just a little tip, you and your husband should create a bbm group, within it you can create a grocery list that is updated in real time and it will be present on both phones.
    It's a feature my wife and I use all the time.

    Posted via CB10
    eddy_berry likes this.
    09-02-14 10:19 AM
  7. Bbnivende's Avatar
    Good news, his BlackBerry is addictive.

    Bad news, the Q10 died young.
    09-02-14 10:48 AM
  8. OTCHRussell's Avatar
    Just a little tip, you and your husband should create a bbm group, within it you can create a grocery list that is updated in real time and it will be present on both phones.
    It's a feature my wife and I use all the time.

    Posted via CB10
    Good idea!

    Posted via my Q10 or Z10
    09-02-14 01:11 PM

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