07-09-14 08:52 PM
43 12
tools
  1. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    Meh when you load a new OS, it shows you all that crap... and most phones use gestures these days so it's nothing new.

    Now if you were telling me the demo phones weren't doing the demo right then a whole nother story
    That's what I'm telling you. Go into a random store that carried BB10 phones, and you either saw a phone that was stuck in Demo Mode, which didn't allow you to do anything other than watch it cycle through screens, or you had a normal phone with no prompts about what to do, so even if the previous customer had gotten the phone back to the home screen, the next person to pick it up would launch an app, then get lost trying to figure out how to exit that app, get frustrated, then set it down and walk away, making their first BB10 experience a bad one.

    The BB10 interface itself is fine, and as I said before, anyone could learn it in a short time without much trouble, but without even the most basic level of instruction, most people were hopelessly lost, simply because they were trained to look for a home button (again, even on BBOS phones) or a back button. For people who don't know that swiping exists as a means of navigation, there's nothing to indicate what to do, and that means that for most people, the BB10 interface is, at least initially, very unintuitive. A brand new (to most people) OS concept can't AFFORD to be unintuitive, and I'm sure that hurt BB10's sales at launch.

    At least the demo stands should have had some written/graphical instructions about how to swipe. Just the Home and Back swipes would have been plenty to get the concept across, but again, someone at BB apparently didn't think that was important.
    TgeekB likes this.
    07-07-14 08:48 PM
  2. spikesolie's Avatar
    That's what I'm telling you. Go into a random store that carried BB10 phones, and you either saw a phone that was stuck in Demo Mode, which didn't allow you to do anything other than watch it cycle through screens, or you had a normal phone with no prompts about what to do, so even if the previous customer had gotten the phone back to the home screen, the next person to pick it up would launch an app, then get lost trying to figure out how to exit that app, get frustrated, then set it down and walk away, making their first BB10 experience a bad one.

    The BB10 interface itself is fine, and as I said before, anyone could learn it in a short time without much trouble, but without even the most basic level of instruction, most people were hopelessly lost, simply because they were trained to look for a home button (again, even on BBOS phones) or a back button. For people who don't know that swiping exists as a means of navigation, there's nothing to indicate what to do, and that means that for most people, the BB10 interface is, at least initially, very unintuitive. A brand new (to most people) OS concept can't AFFORD to be unintuitive, and I'm sure that hurt BB10's sales at launch.

    At least the demo stands should have had some written/graphical instructions about how to swipe. Just the Home and Back swipes would have been plenty to get the concept across, but again, someone at BB apparently didn't think that was important.
    Well then agreed. Bad demo fail. We do agree

    Posted via CB10
    TgeekB likes this.
    07-07-14 09:14 PM
  3. anon8656116's Avatar
    The home buttons on smartphones are pretty much like the start button on Windows. Too strongly engrained in most people’s minds. If it’s not there, hell breaks loose. Only the dedicated or curious people will have an open mind to learn new controls, as this child demonstrates very well. :-]
    07-07-14 10:10 PM
  4. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    I really like BB10 interface and believe it's as simple as breathing.
    I also understand the "demo" point here.
    Yet, I dislike kids instrumented for any commercial or "adult world" purpose.
    I won't share this, but it's only me, maybe.
    TgeekB likes this.
    07-08-14 04:30 AM
  5. Jonesy1966's Avatar
    Ha! I don't think people realise how intuitive BB10 is until they try and use another OS after using it for a while. I don't have a hate on for any device, they all have their merits and demerits, but I can no longer use my wife's iPad, not that I use it that often. I keep trying to swipe away and it sits there doing nothing, going back to the home screen starts out being a really frustrating experience, so does waking the device up with a swipe, until it sinks in that I actually have to push a button or two. I blame my PlayBook, I took to that thing so quickly that from an operational point of view everything else became obsolete, I was already primed for BB10 when it landed last year. I guess it's what you're used to but I honestly find it the easiest and quickest OS to navigate through.
    07-08-14 05:37 AM
  6. amjass12's Avatar
    Bb10 is easy to use even for a 2 year old.

    However if i give someone who has never use bb10 my phone and say make a phone call... They couldn't figure it out. Why would swiping up be the assumption.. Why not sideways or downwards... I don't think people can be called stupid for not knowing. None of my friends could figure it out.. I would be driving and ask them to start navigating as we were lost.. The phone is locked... Can't figure it out.. Even with a button at the top.. It's not as easy as it sounds just because we know how to use it. Given some time u would figure it out eventually. I think that's the problem

    Once ur use to it though it is simple enough even for a 2 year old to use.
    07-08-14 05:46 AM
  7. reeneebob's Avatar
    Ironic that many of those same people at that board used to insult iOS users as using kiddy OS's and 'tools not toys'.

    Suddenly being useable by a toddler is a feature set.

    Sorry, the hypocrisy always astounds me.
    TgeekB and bbq10l like this.
    07-08-14 07:23 AM
  8. anon1727506's Avatar
    Ha! I don't think people realise how intuitive BB10 is until they try and use another OS after using it for a while. I don't have a hate on for any device, they all have their merits and demerits, but I can no longer use my wife's iPad, not that I use it that often. I keep trying to swipe away and it sits there doing nothing, going back to the home screen starts out being a really frustrating experience, so does waking the device up with a swipe, until it sinks in that I actually have to push a button or two. I blame my PlayBook, I took to that thing so quickly that from an operational point of view everything else became obsolete, I was already primed for BB10 when it landed last year. I guess it's what you're used to but I honestly find it the easiest and quickest OS to navigate through.
    Swiping is not intuitive... pushing a button is.

    Once you "learn" the PlayBook or BB10 UI and how they work, they can become easy to use and I would say even more productive. But that isn't the same as being intuitive...

    I too had problems when I first used iOS or Android after using my PlayBook. Even now with my limited use of Android it takes a while to get around, but iOS is very simple to use, maybe a little too simple or basic.
    07-08-14 07:37 AM
  9. ArmedHitman's Avatar
    I have to say.. Smart Kid :|
    07-08-14 07:59 AM
  10. bungaboy's Avatar
    Ironic that many of those same people at that board used to insult iOS users as using kiddy OS's and 'tools not toys'.

    Suddenly being useable by a toddler is a feature set.

    Sorry, the hypocrisy always astounds me.
    Tongue in cheek, right?
    reeneebob likes this.
    07-08-14 08:02 AM
  11. lovedaazn's Avatar
    Kids soak up knowledge like a sponge soaks up water. The reason adults have problems with BB10 is because it goes against the norm of a home button and button pushing in general for OS navigation. So something they have gotten used to for a couple years will be their instinct. To teach a new way of doing things... well you know what they say about teaching old dogs new tricks. It just takes getting used to for most people, but it's the same reason I pick up my girlfriend's iPhone, swipe up and then facepalm.

    Posted via CB10
    BB10 I'd so simple. It does need some getting use to. When I was at burger King, I saw a 65 year old + lady using her Z10. I was quite impressed.

    Posted via CB10
    07-08-14 08:02 AM
  12. spikesolie's Avatar
    Swiping is not intuitive... pushing a button is.

    Once you "learn" the PlayBook or BB10 UI and how they work, they can become easy to use and I would say even more productive. But that isn't the same as being intuitive...

    I too had problems when I first used iOS or Android after using my PlayBook. Even now with my limited use of Android it takes a while to get around, but iOS is very simple to use, maybe a little too simple or basic.
    Nothing makes a button intuitive or not either imo it's just something that has been part of this technology.

    For example I think using a key to start a car is intuitive compared to "push to start "

    Also I'd like to add that swiping can be more intuitive for example reading an ebook. Just like a real book, swipe at the end of it to flip to a new page. It's more intuitive than looking for a button isn't it?

    Posted via CB10
    Last edited by spikesolie; 07-08-14 at 01:49 PM.
    07-08-14 10:05 AM
  13. Jonesy1966's Avatar
    Swiping is not intuitive... pushing a button is.

    Once you "learn" the PlayBook or BB10 UI and how they work, they can become easy to use and I would say even more productive. But that isn't the same as being intuitive...

    I too had problems when I first used iOS or Android after using my PlayBook. Even now with my limited use of Android it takes a while to get around, but iOS is very simple to use, maybe a little too simple or basic.
    I'm sorry, but how is swiping any less intuitive than pushing a button? I find it more intuitive and natural and yet I've spent 29 years of using devices by pushing buttons to get what I want, I adapted to it almost immediately and buttons I find clumsy and very often illogical.
    07-08-14 10:14 AM
  14. TgeekB's Avatar
    Ironic that many of those same people at that board used to insult iOS users as using kiddy OS's and 'tools not toys'.

    Suddenly being useable by a toddler is a feature set.

    Sorry, the hypocrisy always astounds me.
    Now this is funny!

    Posted with my Q
    reeneebob likes this.
    07-08-14 04:25 PM
  15. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    I think so major concept at play here that if one wants folks to try something new, one better make sure it's worth their while to learn it.

    I think folks wouldn't have minded figuring out gestures if the product (BB10) offered stuff to make it worth adopting in the long run.
    07-08-14 07:35 PM
  16. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    The word "intuitive" means "the functionality or operating procedures are obvious to someone who has never seen it before." Everyone knows buttons are there to be pushed, so if they see a Home button (even a virtual one), the need to push/tap/click it is intuitive to virtually anyone.

    With BB10 (Z3/Z10/Z30), there's no physical button and no virtual button, and no visual or other indicator that swiping is the method for navigation. Without any obvious reference, by definition, it isn't intuitive (people don't immediately know what to do). That doesn't mean BB10 is difficult to use (once you know how it works), or that it isn't efficient, but it can't be argued that the interface is intuitive, because objectively it is not.

    Go collect 100 random people off the street, and them the phone, and ask them to navigate around or move through apps, and most people won't be able to figure it out within 60 seconds. Why? Because there is nothing on the screen, and no physical control, that makes the navigation method obvious to a new user. That is the very definition of unintuitive.

    As I said in an earlier post on this thread, that doesn't mean I don't like the interface, or that I have any trouble using it myself - I don't. It doesn't mean that people couldn't quickly learn to use it, because they could. It simply means that those critical 60 seconds they spend trying it out in the store, with no one to advise them or demonstrate for them, is going to make for a very frustrating experience for most people, and that's bad for BB. I also suggested what could have been a VERY simple software fix to this problem (virtual home and back buttons that could be turned off by the user, but are on by default). That would have been one less barrier to BB10 adoption.
    07-08-14 07:41 PM
  17. spikesolie's Avatar
    The word "intuitive" means "the functionality or operating procedures are obvious to someone who has never seen it before." Everyone knows buttons are there to be pushed, so if they see a Home button (even a virtual one), the need to push/tap/click it is intuitive to virtually anyone.

    With BB10 (Z3/Z10/Z30), there's no physical button and no virtual button, and no visual or other indicator that swiping is the method for navigation. Without any obvious reference, by definition, it isn't intuitive (people don't immediately know what to do). That doesn't mean BB10 is difficult to use (once you know how it works), or that it isn't efficient, but it can't be argued that the interface is intuitive, because objectively it is not.

    Go collect 100 random people off the street, and them the phone, and ask them to navigate around or move through apps, and most people won't be able to figure it out within 60 seconds. Why? Because there is nothing on the screen, and no physical control, that makes the navigation method obvious to a new user. That is the very definition of unintuitive.

    As I said in an earlier post on this thread, that doesn't mean I don't like the interface, or that I have any trouble using it myself - I don't. It doesn't mean that people couldn't quickly learn to use it, because they could. It simply means that those critical 60 seconds they spend trying it out in the store, with no one to advise them or demonstrate for them, is going to make for a very frustrating experience for most people, and that's bad for BB. I also suggested what could have been a VERY simple software fix to this problem (virtual home and back buttons that could be turned off by the user, but are on by default). That would have been one less barrier to BB10 adoption.
    People have been trained to use buttons

    Posted via CB10
    07-08-14 08:14 PM
  18. anon8656116's Avatar
    The word "intuitive" means "the functionality or operating procedures are obvious to someone who has never seen it before." Everyone knows buttons are there to be pushed, so if they see a Home button (even a virtual one), the need to push/tap/click it is intuitive to virtually anyone.
    How do you know what a button does without actually pushing it? You can’t rely on your experience for this one, unless the button itself gives it away (e.g. a label or symbol). So unless the button is labelled or has an obvious symbol, a person who has never seen a home button before wouldn’t know what it does. You could find out by pressing it, but that’s not intuition in relation to its function. I agree though that a button is a lot easier for trial and error to build up experience than some gesture (especially a gesture that must be triggered from a certain point of the screen), so in that sense it makes other smartphones more approachable even for inexperienced users. But it’s not intuitive.
    07-09-14 08:52 PM
43 12

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