07-09-14 08:52 PM
43 12
tools
  1. Mayor McCheese's Avatar
    Found a funny video posted from the guys at N4BB showing how easy and intuitive BlackBerry 10 OS really is - that even a two year old can navigate the phone.

    Definitely flies against the crap reviewers of bb10 who tell people how difficult the OS is to learn, how there is a steep learning curve.... lol



    Enjoy.

    Posted via CB10
    07-06-14 10:51 AM
  2. Uzi's Avatar
    Nice video
    Yeah I agree BlackBerry 10 is very intuitive to use especially with native app

    Not really with android port tough

    Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone.
    07-06-14 10:55 AM
  3. gimmi786's Avatar
    Lovely video, really a friendly Os but don't why people still think BlackBerry 10 is so complicated.

    Posted via CB10
    kbz1960 likes this.
    07-06-14 11:21 AM
  4. Aljean Thein's Avatar
    They just can't comprehend the swiping up,down and a curve into their brains. It's too advanced for them

    Posted via CB10
    ronfc likes this.
    07-06-14 12:07 PM
  5. eddy_berry's Avatar
    Kids soak up knowledge like a sponge soaks up water. The reason adults have problems with BB10 is because it goes against the norm of a home button and button pushing in general for OS navigation. So something they have gotten used to for a couple years will be their instinct. To teach a new way of doing things... well you know what they say about teaching old dogs new tricks. It just takes getting used to for most people, but it's the same reason I pick up my girlfriend's iPhone, swipe up and then facepalm.

    Posted via CB10
    07-06-14 02:13 PM
  6. Mayor McCheese's Avatar
    Kids soak up knowledge like a sponge soaks up water. The reason adults have problems with BB10 is because it goes against the norm of a home button and button pushing in general for OS navigation. So something they have gotten used to for a couple years will be their instinct. To teach a new way of doing things... well you know what they say about teaching old dogs new tricks. It just takes getting used to for most people, but it's the same reason I pick up my girlfriend's iPhone, swipe up and then facepalm.

    Posted via CB10
    True.... but we're talking about things in terms of like 3 or 4 swiping motions that you need to navigate 90 percent of the OS.... learning curve my ***.

    Posted via CB10
    07-06-14 02:58 PM
  7. spikesolie's Avatar
    Kids soak up knowledge like a sponge soaks up water. The reason adults have problems with BB10 is because it goes against the norm of a home button and button pushing in general for OS navigation. So something they have gotten used to for a couple years will be their instinct. To teach a new way of doing things... well you know what they say about teaching old dogs new tricks. It just takes getting used to for most people, but it's the same reason I pick up my girlfriend's iPhone, swipe up and then facepalm.

    Posted via CB10
    It's not really a learning curve though

    Posted via CB10
    07-06-14 03:16 PM
  8. targnik's Avatar
    Muscle memory...

    It takes 3,000 repetitions before something becomes 2nd nature.

    People feel/think that's too long :imo:

    Z10STL100-2/10.2.1.3247
    07-06-14 03:25 PM
  9. eddy_berry's Avatar
    True.... but we're talking about things in terms of like 3 or 4 swiping motions that you need to navigate 90 percent of the OS.... learning curve my ***.

    Posted via CB10
    It's not really a learning curve though

    Posted via CB10
    The "learning curve" in question is strictly that of the individual users and not of the OS. That was my point. Most young kids are quick learners. Most adults will not be as quick as the kids on something like BB10 only because they have been doing things differently the same way for a longer period of time. Being 'set in their ways.' Some adults will have a much steeper learning curve than others and will take longer to learn something (or not at all). I don't think BB10 is difficult, but some may find it difficult because what they have been doing for so many years is perceived as easier to then only because they have gotten used to it. They probably don't remember having trouble with it when they first started out either. This is most telling to those who complain about BB10 being difficult to learn. BB10 is different and is not difficult at all, but I can't speak for everyone.

    Posted via CB10
    07-06-14 04:04 PM
  10. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    The other issue is that people picking up a BB10 phone in a cell phone store (when they were carried) were given no way to know that the OS required swiping. People would launch an app by tapping an icon, use the app, and then couldn't figure out how to exit or get back to the Home screen. There is no button and no indicators that prompt them to swipe, so after 5 seconds of feeling stupid, they put it down and walk away and think "man, those BB phones suck!"

    Virtually every one of them could learn the swipes, probably in under 5 minutes. But for people used to a Home button/icon (which even older BB phones used, don't forget!), swiping for basic navigation in and out of apps is a new concept, and one that takes both initial instruction and some practice to master. And this created a big initial barrier for everyone doing a "60-second cell phone store try-out".

    I've mentioned before that I'd have designed BB10 with virtual Home and Back buttons that were on by default, with swipe gestures still enabled, and that a user could turn off once they got used to swiping. Something that simple would have made the learning curve much less steep for people who had no prior knowledge of BB10 before trying one out (i.e., most people), and likely would have greatly improved launch sales, with ZERO impact on the usability of the OS. It's almost crazy that they didn't do this.
    07-06-14 05:04 PM
  11. spikesolie's Avatar
    The other issue is that people picking up a BB10 phone in a cell phone store (when they were carried) were given no way to know that the OS required swiping. People would launch an app by tapping an icon, use the app, and then couldn't figure out how to exit or get back to the Home screen. There is no button and no indicators that prompt them to swipe, so after 5 seconds of feeling stupid, they put it down and walk away and think "man, those BB phones suck!"

    Virtually every one of them could learn the swipes, probably in under 5 minutes. But for people used to a Home button/icon (which even older BB phones used, don't forget!), swiping for basic navigation in and out of apps is a new concept, and one that takes both initial instruction and some practice to master. And this created a big initial barrier for everyone doing a "60-second cell phone store try-out".

    I've mentioned before that I'd have designed BB10 with virtual Home and Back buttons that were on by default, with swipe gestures still enabled, and that a user could turn off once they got used to swiping. Something that simple would have made the learning curve much less steep for people who had no prior knowledge of BB10 before trying one out (i.e., most people), and likely would have greatly improved launch sales, with ZERO impact on the usability of the OS. It's almost crazy that they didn't do this.
    Meh when you load a new OS, it shows you all that crap... and most phones use gestures these days so it's nothing new.

    Now if you were telling me the demo phones weren't doing the demo right then a whole nother story

    Posted via CB10
    07-06-14 09:18 PM
  12. boeingrules's Avatar
    Kids soak up knowledge like a sponge soaks up water. The reason adults have problems with BB10 is because it goes against the norm of a home button and button pushing in general for OS navigation. So something they have gotten used to for a couple years will be their instinct. To teach a new way of doing things... well you know what they say about teaching old dogs new tricks. It just takes getting used to for most people, but it's the same reason I pick up my girlfriend's iPhone, swipe up and then facepalm.

    Posted via CB10
    Well yes. But don't you agree that a kid would understand how to use an iPhone faster than a Z10, even though they do learn things faster in general? It requires less explaining, first of all..

    Posted via CB10
    07-07-14 12:56 AM
  13. wincyUt's Avatar
    Simple and straightforward video that will go a long way shutting up trash talkers.

    Posted via CB10
    07-07-14 01:08 AM
  14. Mr.G_under's Avatar
    I like this video...because my 2.3 year old daughter finds her way around mt Z10 quite easily to open her educational games. The only thing she comes to me for is to unlock the device.

    AS a matter of fact, over the weekend I placed all apps related to her in a folder and it still was not difficult for her to get there.
    07-07-14 01:23 AM
  15. Mayor McCheese's Avatar
    The other issue is that people picking up a BB10 phone in a cell phone store (when they were carried) were given no way to know that the OS required swiping. People would launch an app by tapping an icon, use the app, and then couldn't figure out how to exit or get back to the Home screen. There is no button and no indicators that prompt them to swipe, so after 5 seconds of feeling stupid, they put it down and walk away and think "man, those BB phones suck!"

    Virtually every one of them could learn the swipes, probably in under 5 minutes. But for people used to a Home button/icon (which even older BB phones used, don't forget!), swiping for basic navigation in and out of apps is a new concept, and one that takes both initial instruction and some practice to master. And this created a big initial barrier for everyone doing a "60-second cell phone store try-out".

    I've mentioned before that I'd have designed BB10 with virtual Home and Back buttons that were on by default, with swipe gestures still enabled, and that a user could turn off once they got used to swiping. Something that simple would have made the learning curve much less steep for people who had no prior knowledge of BB10 before trying one out (i.e., most people), and likely would have greatly improved launch sales, with ZERO impact on the usability of the OS. It's almost crazy that they didn't do this.
    You raise a good point - carriers weren't really trained to teach or sell consumers on bb10 the right way, and it's not like blackberry gave a super effort on that front either.

    Makes me wonder if they even had an override to make sure the tutorial system would not shutoff after a few hours of use like it does regularity on bb10 phones, as that is probably the only in-your-face way of learning the OS.

    Posted via CB10
    07-07-14 02:53 AM
  16. Mayor McCheese's Avatar
    Well yes. But don't you agree that a kid would understand how to use an iPhone faster than a Z10, even though they do learn things faster in general? It requires less explaining, first of all..

    Posted via CB10
    Depends what the kid is doing.... messaging? iPhone loses 10 times out of 10. Messaging on bb10 is up,right for everything. ios is this app, that app, that app, etc with closing and reopening of apps over and over again, requiring one to be aware of each messaging app icon is at all times. Not to mention that after the message is read in the notifications Centre, the kid must then realize that they have to open the corresponding app to reach the message again.... where as bb10 is always just up, right.

    I would argue most things on bb10 are easier to understand and use than iPhone, that is if you aren't considering them in the context of modern phones today. Having a no home button In a world of button filled phones makes it look worse than it really is to use and learn.

    Posted via CB10
    07-07-14 03:00 AM
  17. Mayor McCheese's Avatar
    The "learning curve" in question is strictly that of the individual users and not of the OS. That was my point. Most young kids are quick learners. Most adults will not be as quick as the kids on something like BB10 only because they have been doing things differently the same way for a longer period of time. Being 'set in their ways.' Some adults will have a much steeper learning curve than others and will take longer to learn something (or not at all). I don't think BB10 is difficult, but some may find it difficult because what they have been doing for so many years is perceived as easier to then only because they have gotten used to it. They probably don't remember having trouble with it when they first started out either. This is most telling to those who complain about BB10 being difficult to learn. BB10 is different and is not difficult at all, but I can't speak for everyone.

    Posted via CB10
    Good point, agreed.

    Posted via CB10
    07-07-14 03:02 AM
  18. eddy_berry's Avatar
    Well yes. But don't you agree that a kid would understand how to use an iPhone faster than a Z10, even though they do learn things faster in general? It requires less explaining, first of all..

    Posted via CB10
    An iPhone does not require less explanation to do basic tasks. It's about the same. The difference being a gesture vs. a button. Swipe up versus push button. To see open apps is easier on BB10. Open apps are on your BB10 home screen. In iOS they are hidden behind a double tap of the home button. Something I've had to teach to many iPhone users. There are some things admittedly easier on an iPhone, but to me it comes down to application support as the reason to it being easier. BB10 OS does a lot of things better in my opinion.

    Posted via CB10
    07-07-14 07:07 AM
  19. ajst222's Avatar
    Meh when you load a new OS, it shows you all that crap... and most phones use gestures these days so it's nothing new.

    Now if you were telling me the demo phones weren't doing the demo right then a whole nother story

    Posted via CB10
    The demo/tutorial isn't on in the store. It's just the phone's OS. Hasn't been on in any Verizon store or Best Buy I've ever been in, and this is the case with every phone as well.
    07-07-14 07:35 AM
  20. anon1727506's Avatar
    Another problem is the whole Native vs Android. What works in the OS and for native apps, doesn't work for Android APK Apps. Even some ported apps are a little different. Setting might be a swipe down, they might be a menu button, they might be under another menu, or there might be no setting....

    But I agree with Troy that while swiping back makes sense once you have done it, it's hard for someone that just picks the phone up to know what to do with it. With at least one physical (or virtual) button, that gives someone at least something to try.... with BB10 you are just stuck if you don't know what you are suppose to do.

    But I don't see BB10 being so difficult to use it would impact sales......

    But according to people that it is their business to test these things.....
    http://www.pfeifferreport.com/v2/wp-...e-Shootout.pdf
    07-07-14 10:09 AM
  21. BlackBerry Guy's Avatar
    It's not really a matter of whether or not something is easy to learn, it's whether or not people want to learn. It's one of the reasons why Apple seems reluctant to ditch the home button And also why there were some long time BBOS users who complained BB10 was too radical a departure from what they were use to. A 2 year old child hasn't developed a preference for a mobile OS yet. Some may be easier to pickup than others, but generally I find that on most mobile OSs I've used, I can pick up the basics in an afternoon, and pretty much master it within a week.
    anon1727506 and Tre Lawrence like this.
    07-07-14 10:27 AM
  22. anon1727506's Avatar
    It's not really a matter of whether or not something is easy to learn, it's whether or not people want to learn. It's one of the reasons why Apple seems reluctant to ditch the home button And also why there were some long time BBOS users who complained BB10 was too radical a departure from what they were use to. A 2 year old child hasn't developed a preference for a mobile OS yet. Some may be easier to pickup than others, but generally I find that on most mobile OSs I've used, I can pick up the basics in an afternoon, and pretty much master it within a week.
    Just some.....


    Kids aren't afraid.... fear is what really holds a lot of people back from trying something new. Either they are afraid they can't learn, or they are afraid they will break something.
    07-07-14 03:45 PM
  23. eddy_berry's Avatar
    I agree with Troy that BlackBerry didn't properly inform people and especially Sales Associates about how the phone works. Even a sticker that says swipe up instead of pressing a button on the display screens would have sufficed. It is a great departure from every other phone that has a home button. It needed at least that basic knowledge that it uses a gesture instead of needing buttons. But I stand by the opinion that it is not more difficult than anything else out there.

    Posted via CB10
    07-07-14 06:11 PM
  24. TgeekB's Avatar
    Exactly. The kid in the video is not seeing the phone for the first time, he has been coached. Plus he has not used phones with icons and home buttons for years. I believe this is what people are actually talking about. Anyone who walks into a store and picks up a bb10 device for the first time, with no instructions, would have difficulty. People are likely to set it down and walk away. And, no, this doesn't make them lazy.

    Everything I say is my OPINION and is based on my experiences and what I have learned. It is not meant to attack but to drive meaningful conversation. Let's all be civil!
    07-07-14 06:34 PM
  25. DaSchwantz's Avatar
    My two year old also does just fine with the swiping gestures, and he just turned two this weekend!

    Posted via CB10
    07-07-14 07:50 PM
43 12

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 130
    Last Post: 11-09-14, 08:20 PM
  2. BlackBerry launch new phone in USA?
    By vlzqz101 in forum General BlackBerry Discussion
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 07-08-14, 09:09 AM
  3. Blackberry OS 10-apps opening-It should be really that way???
    By Chandra Prabu in forum BlackBerry 10 OS
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 07-08-14, 02:53 AM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD