1. anon(55900)'s Avatar
    I just read about Android moving into first place in the mobile market. Twhich some might disagre with)

    I like my BB, and plan to continue owning them, but, I also wonder if the length of time RIM is taking to catch up, (and they do need to catch up) will put them permanently in the rear of the pack.

    I say a gross error was made by RIM selling Torch only through ATT rather than multiply providers such as Samsung does.

    It does seem like RIM's business plan is to be a MicroSoft in the sense that it doesn't innovate unless forced by the competition.

    As much as I like my BB, I do have thoughts of changing to something different. My goal is to have a large touch screen with slide out keyboard, witthout jumping the Tmobile ship.

    I'm waiting until fall to see what comes out at Tmobile for BB phones and if I don't see a touch with keys, I'll probably jump ship. I'm tired of waiting for RIM, sorry.

    And my phone choice swings my tablet purchase also, see where I'm going RIM!? It's not just phones anymore!

    Michael
    03-05-11 07:31 AM
  2. the_sandman_454's Avatar
    They aren't really such a niche market, as there are still many users out there both in the US and abroad for whom things like standard data compression via BIS/BES, the security of the device, and other such things trump a higher performance device with more storage and other capabilities (flash, etc).

    They're not going anywhere, although in higher end consumer markets like the US, they may find their share continue to slip in the short term until they bring forth their next generation of devices. We've all seen their longer term approach to this, and they've announced their roadmap publicly that they're not rushing to make "superphones".

    You, like everybody else, need to realize that a smartphone (or any other product really) is a compromise. All of them, regardless of functionality, OS, manufacturer, etc. The trick to being happy with where you're spending your money is to figure out which of the compromises works best for you personally.
    sleepngbear likes this.
    03-05-11 09:31 AM
  3. pr1nce's Avatar
    Not another BB vs Android thread?? IMO BB will continue to own a sizable part of smartphone market. Even though Android might be more flashy or have some bell and whistles that BB doesn't. BB does what it is supposed to do and does it well.
    03-05-11 09:55 AM
  4. sleepngbear's Avatar
    They aren't really such a niche market, as there are still many users out there both in the US and abroad for whom things like standard data compression via BIS/BES, the security of the device, and other such things trump a higher performance device with more storage and other capabilities (flash, etc).

    They're not going anywhere, although in higher end consumer markets like the US, they may find their share continue to slip in the short term until they bring forth their next generation of devices. We've all seen their longer term approach to this, and they've announced their roadmap publicly that they're not rushing to make "superphones".

    You, like everybody else, need to realize that a smartphone (or any other product really) is a compromise. All of them, regardless of functionality, OS, manufacturer, etc. The trick to being happy with where you're spending your money is to figure out which of the compromises works best for you personally.
    Great points, and I think continued market share slip is very likely.

    The thing people have to remember is that before the iPhone, BB's were pretty much the class of smart phones. Admittedly, at that time RIM did not have much in the way of a battle plan for the devices they thought could never be made, and consequently got caught with their pants down a little bit. Then, to add insult to injury, Android came along and gave them an atomic wedgie.

    Point is, after being virtually the only player in the game, when big new competitors arrive on the scene, market share can only go down. Yes, RIM could have done more to stem the onslaught of competitors. A little foresight and open-mindedness about what those competitors were capable of might have allowed them to maintain market share leadership -- or not. All that considered, they've still managed to not only survive, but realize record sales growth, which is more important to a company's long-term health than market share, especially in this explosive consumer environment.

    In any event, RIM has pretty much proclaimed that they are not going to try to compete with the higher-end 'superphones', but rather are committed to continue to bring improvements to the features and functionality at which they already excel -- at least on the smart phone front. That strategy has its risk, specifically regarding losing current users who want that superphone functionality. On the other hand, trying to deliver a feature- and spec-rich device does not come without its own risks, not the least of which being straying from its core competency: powerful, efficient, and intuitive communications devices. That's not to say their phones shouldn't do other things, and indeed they do other things, just not to the extent that other manufacturers have taken it (and, if you read just about any thread on this board, not to the extent that some users prefer they take it). But the fact remains, there is still a huge market for users who require their phones primarily for communications, and proof is in the fact that RIM's sales continue to grow despite the increasing presence of 'superior' competitors -- market share slide notwithstanding. I think it's pretty clear that RIM believes its best strategy lies in staying true to those customers. We can speculate all we want here, but only time will tell if it's the right strategy or not.

    People also need to remember that a major part of RIM's business model is BES and BIS. A portion of what you pay to your carrier every month for that BlackBerry data plan ends up going into RIM's ongoing revenue stream. Most people don't realize that those services are an integral part of RIM's bread and butter, and all the devices they sell need to wholly support those services and the benefits they bring to both business and consumer users. Anything that deviates from that runs the additional risk of diluting their whole value proposition. That's the part of the business that you don't see looking at an individual product's spec sheet.

    Beyond phones, it still remains to be seen what kind of guns they've brought to bear for the PlayBook, for which there are no excuses for not delivering a full-function and feature-rich user experience. All indications so far are they brought big ones.

    Not another BB vs Android thread?? IMO BB will continue to own a sizable part of smartphone market. Even though Android might be more flashy or have some bell and whistles that BB doesn't.
    I don't think it's quite there ... yet. But give it time, they all eventually come around.

    BB does what it is supposed to do and does it well.
    Bingo!
    03-05-11 10:37 AM
  5. qbnkelt's Avatar
    WOW, awesome thoughts, all.....all I can say is I wholeheartedly agree...

    But....I'd say there is one are where it could be considered niche - highly secure networks.
    03-05-11 10:41 AM
  6. sleepngbear's Avatar
    WOW, awesome thoughts, all.....all I can say is I wholeheartedly agree...

    But....I'd say there is one are where it could be considered niche - highly secure networks.
    No, no, no ... don't go there!! You'll get the Android-is-as-secure-as-BB crowd started, and that won't be good for anybody.
    03-05-11 10:52 AM
  7. qbnkelt's Avatar
    No, no, no ... don't go there!! You'll get the Android-is-as-secure-as-BB crowd started, and that won't be good for anybody.
    ooo, I was bad...I must be punished....
    03-05-11 11:39 AM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD