12-14-11 08:45 PM
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  1. Accidental Post's Avatar
    Definitely Friendly's Coffee Ice Cream
    12-08-11 12:18 PM
  2. sam_b77's Avatar
    Not being able to edit forwarded emails is understandable for business users. However, if I am forwarding a joke a friend sent me (and also sent to 20 other people), I like to be able to remove all those other addresses when I forward.
    Highlight text body> copy> Compose new mail> Send To: Enter recipient name(s)> Paste Text> Click send.

    I'm sure every smartphone can do the above.

    If they enable editing forward for consumers, it would be enabled for business users as well. And even in the consumer space it leaves room for a mischief creator to falsify statements and then lay it on the door of the original sender.

    I would like to know if the forward I receive has been edited or not. And also would like to ensure that any email I have sent cannot be forwarded after being edited.
    Last edited by sam_b77; 12-08-11 at 12:29 PM.
    12-08-11 12:27 PM
  3. sam_b77's Avatar
    Definitely Friendly's Coffee Ice Cream
    You had to choose something which wasn't on today's menu.... Expected from you
    12-08-11 12:28 PM
  4. belfastdispatcher's Avatar
    Definitely Friendly's Coffee Ice Cream
    Wow, something we agree on lol
    12-08-11 12:31 PM
  5. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    Highlight text body> copy> Compose new mail> Send To: Enter recipient name(s)> Paste Text> Click send.

    I'm sure every smartphone can do the above.

    If they enable editing forward for consumers, it would be enabled for business users as well. And even in the consumer space it leaves room for a mischief creator to falsify statements and then lay it on the door of the original sender.

    I would like to know if the forward I receive has been edited or not. And also would like to ensure that any email I have sent cannot be forwarded after being edited.
    What you mentioned cannot be done if there are images in the body in addition to text. It also eliminates any HTML formatting of the text itself, since BlackBerry only composes in plain text.

    Not everyone is a business user, and not all emails are business-related.

    I don't hate that BlackBerry quirk. I just use my PC mail client to edit and forward those emails. However, it would be nice if I had the ability to edit and forward on the BlackBerry, so I didn't have to wait until I was using the PC.
    12-08-11 12:37 PM
  6. belfastdispatcher's Avatar
    What you mentioned cannot be done if there are images in the body in addition to text. It also eliminates any HTML formatting of the text itself, since BlackBerry only composes in plain text.

    Not everyone is a business user, and not all emails are business-related.

    I don't hate that BlackBerry quirk. I just use my PC mail client to edit and forward those emails. However, it would be nice if I had the ability to edit and forward on the BlackBerry, so I didn't have to wait until I was using the PC.
    As they say, there's an app for that, Email++ is one of them and it integrates into BB email
    12-08-11 12:43 PM
  7. gregorylkelly's Avatar
    They definitely should at least allow you to delete the original sender info. There are many times when I want to forward information to someone but not send it with the original senders info (most times per the senders request). Also, if this can all be done on a PC anyways, why can't they allow it on a BB since we have the option to do this anyways?
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    12-08-11 12:58 PM
  8. moiselles's Avatar
    I am reporting all of you. Coffee Ice-cream!
    I'm lactose-intolerant. No ice cream for me!
    12-08-11 02:05 PM
  9. avt123's Avatar
    I'm lactose-intolerant. No ice cream for me!
    You get some Italian Ice then.
    12-08-11 02:42 PM
  10. Accidental Post's Avatar
    Ewwww you went there...............
    12-08-11 02:44 PM
  11. Chrisy's Avatar
    I'm lactose-intolerant. No ice cream for me!
    You must eat Soy Dream, Tofutti and Simply Decadent non dairy like I do. Tastes good!
    12-08-11 03:02 PM
  12. avt123's Avatar
    Ewwww you went there...............
    Your mind is in the gutter.
    12-08-11 04:27 PM
  13. Drill-bitz's Avatar
    I had enough of saying sorry to clients for call drop-outs, not to mention the lousy battery life.
    A full year with iphone 4 and it's back to BB for me.

    Even my Mother, a five year BB user in her 70's, went back to BB this week - 9900. And before anyone cracks an age gag she was a successful business woman.
    12-08-11 04:40 PM
  14. jebulls's Avatar
    Well, if you don't use email much and don't care when you get emails, that's another story.
    But BBs email is better because being pushed, and not fetch, I get it literally before I get it on the laptop. Not to mention the easiness of setup, security, etc.

    The email on android and iPhone looks prettier for now, but it is nowhere near as RELIABLE, as BBs.
    ummmm no.......gmail through exchange is push on an iphone....fully as reliable
    12-08-11 06:37 PM
  15. jebulls's Avatar
    screw you guys, i want vanilla chocolate swirl!
    this!!!!!!!!!!
    12-08-11 06:44 PM
  16. n8ter#AC's Avatar
    Google has set up Exchange servers for Gmail so you just setup your Gmail account as an Exchange account to get push. Not that difficult and takes about a minute.

    Sent using Tapatalk
    The post you quoted blew my mind... I'm astonished. And the OWNED part at the end was just hillarious... Google has had ActiveSync set up for GMail since late 09 or so. Well over a year, I know for a fact...

    Google Sync for your phone
    12-08-11 07:31 PM
  17. Capitan Totti's Avatar
    That was the point but no one has a sense of humor here.
    And btw, GMail is connected via AnctiveSync 24/7, as explained before, so its always in the "cloud", but its not real push.
    The best part is that I am just repeating what you can find anywhere on the net, and yet everyone has to reply all arrogant and then gets offended if someone replies like you do... Ridiculous.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    12-09-11 01:13 AM
  18. soccernamlak's Avatar
    That was the point but no one has a sense of humor here.
    And btw, GMail is connected via AnctiveSync 24/7, as explained before, so its always in the "cloud", but its not real push.
    The best part is that I am just repeating what you can find anywhere on the net, and yet everyone has to reply all arrogant and then gets offended if someone replies like you do... Ridiculous.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Google says it's Push

    Wikipedia says two-way sync

    Wikipedia also ultimately files it under Push Email

    So, technically it's both. It pushes email directly to your device, but continuously syncs your data with their server, so you can see the same things (email, calendar, contacts, etc.) on any device that you choose to use.

    Personally, that's the best way to do it: same thing on different screens while still benefiting from Push technology.

    So to conclude:

    The best part is that I am just repeating what you can find anywhere on the net, and yet everyone has to reply all arrogant and then gets offended if someone replies like you do... Ridiculous.
    12-09-11 02:17 AM
  19. Capitan Totti's Avatar
    I have mentioned in previous posts that GMail is "push" on android, but only BB has true push for all emails. This was the first argument some 12 pages ago. Then people decided to get arrogant and stop reading yet went on an all reporting spree, while I explained numerous times what every site says. Now, if you wanna categorize GMail as push, go ahead, but because your android device is always in "the cloud" of ActiveSync, is it real push? I don't think so...
    And why are you guys getting so touchy, I'll never get it. Its a forum...

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    12-09-11 02:25 AM
  20. Capitan Totti's Avatar
    Best part is that the first to start it all was Accidental Post, who called me "laughable" when it was totally uncalled for... Yet, I am the only one who gets reported for insulting and trolling... Some mods I tell ya...

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    12-09-11 02:28 AM
  21. soccernamlak's Avatar
    Now, if you wanna categorize GMail as push, go ahead, but because your android device is always in "the cloud" of ActiveSync, is it real push? I don't think so...


    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com

    Can I ask what the issue is with having push email also sync with information in the cloud?


    Further, with Gmail, you're still getting new email pushed to your device as soon as it arrives, just like BB does with any email address; it just backs it up for you automatically, so again, having trouble seeing how this isn't real push technology.
    12-09-11 05:14 AM
  22. belfastdispatcher's Avatar
    Can I ask what the issue is with having push email also sync with information in the cloud?


    Further, with Gmail, you're still getting new email pushed to your device as soon as it arrives, just like BB does with any email address; it just backs it up for you automatically, so again, having trouble seeing how this isn't real push technology.
    Again, instant email does not equal push, stop kidding yourself, acticesync is nothing like Blackberry real push.

    Here's how actyvesync works:

    "A mobile phone that's configured to synchronize with an Exchange 2010 server issues an HTTPS request to the server. This request is known as a PING. The request tells the server to notify the device if any items change in any folder that's configured to synchronize in the next 15*minutes. Otherwise, the server should return an HTTP 200 OK message. The mobile phone then stands by. The 15-minute time span is known as a heartbeat interval.
    If no items change in 15*minutes, the server returns a response of HTTP 200 OK. The mobile phone receives this response, resumes activity (known as waking up), and issues its request again. This restarts the process.
    If any items change or new items are received within the 15-minute heartbeat interval, the server sends a response that informs the mobile phone that there's a new or changed item and provides the name of the folder in which the new or changed item resides. After the mobile phone receives this response, it issues a synchronization request for the folder that has the new or changed items. When synchronization is complete, the mobile phone issues a new PING request and the whole process starts over.
    Direct Push depends on network conditions that support a long-standing HTTPS request. If the carrier network for the mobile phone or the firewall doesn't support long-standing HTTPS requests, the HTTPS request is stopped. The following steps describe how Direct Push operates when a mobile phone's carrier network has a time-out value of 13*minutes:

    A mobile phone issues an HTTPS request to the server. The request tells the server to notify the device if any items change in any folder that is configured to synchronize in the next 15*minutes. Otherwise, the server should return an HTTP 200 OK message. The mobile phone then stands by.
    If the server does not respond after 15*minutes, the mobile phone wakes up and concludes that the connection to the server was timed out by the network. The device reissues the HTTPS request, but this time it uses a heartbeat interval of 8*minutes.
    After 8*minutes, the server sends an HTTP 200 OK message. The device then tries to gain a longer connection by issuing a new HTTPS request to the server that has a heartbeat interval of 12*minutes.
    After 4*minutes, a new e-mail message is received and the server responds by sending an HTTPS request that tells the device to synchronize. The device synchronizes and reissues the HTTPS request that has a heartbeat of 12*minutes.
    After 12*minutes, if there are no new or changed items, the server responds by sending an HTTP 200 OK message. The device wakes up and concludes that network conditions support a heartbeat interval of 12*minutes. The device then tries to gain a longer connection by reissuing an HTTPS request that has a heartbeat interval of 16*minutes.
    After 16*minutes, no response is received from the server. The device wakes up and concludes that network conditions cannot support a heartbeat interval of 16*minutes. Because this failure occurred directly after the device tried to increase the heartbeat interval, it concludes that the heartbeat interval has reached its maximum limit. The device then issues an HTTPS request that has a heartbeat interval of 12*minutes because this was the last successful heartbeat interval.
    The mobile phone tries to use the longest heartbeat interval the network supports. This extends battery life on the device and reduces how much data is transferred over the network. Mobile carriers can specify a maximum, minimum, and initial heartbeat value in the registry settings for the mobile phone."
    12-09-11 05:53 AM
  23. belfastdispatcher's Avatar
    You can say BB email works more or less the same except the BIS server is doing all the hard work, the phone just sits and waits for the email to arrive which is true push.
    12-09-11 05:57 AM
  24. Accidental Post's Avatar
    I have mentioned in previous posts that GMail is "push" on android, but only BB has true push for all emails. This was the first argument some 12 pages ago. Then people decided to get arrogant and stop reading yet went on an all reporting spree, while I explained numerous times what every site says. Now, if you wanna categorize GMail as push, go ahead, but because your android device is always in "the cloud" of ActiveSync, is it real push? I don't think so...
    And why are you guys getting so touchy, I'll never get it. Its a forum...

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    You called Americans stupid. That's where it started and yet you edited your post like it never happened. Get that!

    I am done with you.


    Sent from my MD276LL using Tapatalk
    jebulls likes this.
    12-09-11 06:38 AM
  25. tack's Avatar
    Again, instant email does not equal push, stop kidding yourself, acticesync is nothing like Blackberry real push.

    Here's how actyvesync works:

    "A mobile phone that's configured to synchronize with an Exchange 2010 server issues an HTTPS request to the server. This request is known as a PING. The request tells the server to notify the device if any items change in any folder that's configured to synchronize in the next 15*minutes. Otherwise, the server should return an HTTP 200 OK message. The mobile phone then stands by. The 15-minute time span is known as a heartbeat interval.
    If no items change in 15*minutes, the server returns a response of HTTP 200 OK. The mobile phone receives this response, resumes activity (known as waking up), and issues its request again. This restarts the process.
    If any items change or new items are received within the 15-minute heartbeat interval, the server sends a response that informs the mobile phone that there's a new or changed item and provides the name of the folder in which the new or changed item resides. After the mobile phone receives this response, it issues a synchronization request for the folder that has the new or changed items. When synchronization is complete, the mobile phone issues a new PING request and the whole process starts over.
    Direct Push depends on network conditions that support a long-standing HTTPS request. If the carrier network for the mobile phone or the firewall doesn't support long-standing HTTPS requests, the HTTPS request is stopped. The following steps describe how Direct Push operates when a mobile phone's carrier network has a time-out value of 13*minutes:

    A mobile phone issues an HTTPS request to the server. The request tells the server to notify the device if any items change in any folder that is configured to synchronize in the next 15*minutes. Otherwise, the server should return an HTTP 200 OK message. The mobile phone then stands by.
    If the server does not respond after 15*minutes, the mobile phone wakes up and concludes that the connection to the server was timed out by the network. The device reissues the HTTPS request, but this time it uses a heartbeat interval of 8*minutes.
    After 8*minutes, the server sends an HTTP 200 OK message. The device then tries to gain a longer connection by issuing a new HTTPS request to the server that has a heartbeat interval of 12*minutes.
    After 4*minutes, a new e-mail message is received and the server responds by sending an HTTPS request that tells the device to synchronize. The device synchronizes and reissues the HTTPS request that has a heartbeat of 12*minutes.
    After 12*minutes, if there are no new or changed items, the server responds by sending an HTTP 200 OK message. The device wakes up and concludes that network conditions support a heartbeat interval of 12*minutes. The device then tries to gain a longer connection by reissuing an HTTPS request that has a heartbeat interval of 16*minutes.
    After 16*minutes, no response is received from the server. The device wakes up and concludes that network conditions cannot support a heartbeat interval of 16*minutes. Because this failure occurred directly after the device tried to increase the heartbeat interval, it concludes that the heartbeat interval has reached its maximum limit. The device then issues an HTTPS request that has a heartbeat interval of 12*minutes because this was the last successful heartbeat interval.
    The mobile phone tries to use the longest heartbeat interval the network supports. This extends battery life on the device and reduces how much data is transferred over the network. Mobile carriers can specify a maximum, minimum, and initial heartbeat value in the registry settings for the mobile phone."
    The real point is that almost no one cares about the background technical differences, period. That 2% extra battery life due to this technology difference is not selling phones. My phone and most others seem to work just like your BB in terms of push. People getting stuff instantly = happy people, despite the back end technology. Argue all you want about the technical details (assuming you are 100% correct), but it does not compel the choice for most people. The point is that you and others are trying to insinuate some better feature or better experience, but that is not what people see. I am productive on a Droid or iPhone because things get here immediately, just like on my BB.
    12-09-11 07:10 AM
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