1. mrfreetruth's Avatar
    Over the past few weeks apple has been in the news for their many security flaws as hackers cut apple open like an knife to an apple and many in the office are leaving apple for either android or BB. If it were just one person in the office I wouldn't of thought anything of it but it has grown to 6 out of 20 co-workers who have expressed their dislike of apple's weakness and security flaws. Are you or have you left apple due to security flaws? It's become interesting to see how many people now distrust apple.
    08-08-12 09:34 PM
  2. grunt0300's Avatar
    Over the past few weeks apple has been in the news for their many security flaws as hackers cut apple open like an knife to an apple and many in the office are leaving apple for either android or BB. If it were just one person in the office I wouldn't of thought anything of it but it has grown to 6 out of 20 co-workers who have expressed their dislike of apple's weakness and security flaws. Are you or have you left apple due to security flaws? It's become interesting to see how many people now distrust apple.
    I'll stick with Android, thank you very much.
    08-08-12 09:38 PM
  3. tmelon's Avatar
    What multiple security flaws are you referring to? The only one that has been big in the news lately is a blogger who got his iCloud account hacked because of an incompetent employee. There wasn't a vulnerability in the iOS firmware.

    If they started having big issues like credit card numbers and personal information being compromised then I'd consider it, but right now there's nothing of the sort.
    08-08-12 09:47 PM
  4. amazinglygraceless's Avatar
    Those are some stunningly dense coworkers you have if their inability to comprehend the difference between an actual hack and a human being in a call center dropping the ball is going to cause them to change their devices.
    Last edited by amazinglygraceless; 08-08-12 at 10:16 PM.
    08-08-12 10:14 PM
  5. njblackberry's Avatar
    Not a single person has mentioned it. In fact, over the weekend we finally have to support more iPhones than BlackBerrys. Oh well.
    08-08-12 10:19 PM
  6. bungaboy's Avatar
    Well I'm at a loss for words.

    Here I thought it was a Blogger's account was accessed because someone conned somebody at a call centre to give them passwords.

    When all along it was the IOS that was hacked.
    08-08-12 10:22 PM
  7. hornlovah's Avatar
    What multiple security flaws are you referring to? The only one that has been big in the news lately is a blogger who got his iCloud account hacked because of an incompetent employee. There wasn't a vulnerability in the iOS firmware.

    If they started having big issues like credit card numbers and personal information being compromised then I'd consider it, but right now there's nothing of the sort.
    The OP may have be referring to Zdziarski's iPhone exploits at Black Hat on the 26th of last month. They didn't get much press coverage, but he did load a virus onto a locked iPhone that attacked every application on the device once the password was entered. He also broke encryption of a password manager (OneSafe, now patched) with one command line: iOS app hacking alive and well:
    ...The problem, Zdziarski explained, comes from the double-edged sword that is the iOS monoculture. It has benefits, he said, including a reduced attack surface, rapid prototyping, and fewer holes to blame on the developer. But, he added, its homogeneous attack surface means that if you can hack one iOS device, you can hack nearly all. (While it's true that there are different versions of iOS in use, there are significantly fewer than the different flavors of Android.)

    Zdziarski noted that security has become an afterthought for iOS app developers, since they're trusting Apple's iOS Keychain and runtime to be secure. Keychain is the iOS feature that stores passwords, certificates, and other security-related items under encryption. "Anybody with freely available open source tools can get around that encryption now," said Zdziarski, who said the encryption has been busted for two years.

    Zdziarski also showed how he didn't even have to have the passcode to an iPhone to break its encryption. With a phone in his possession, he was able to drop a small piece of code from his computer onto the otherwise-locked phone. The code sits on the iPhone idle until the owner enters in the passcode, decrypting the file system and giving the malicious code access to the entire file system.

    "Developers are not turning on the encryption for most of their apps, and most users defer to a four-digit PIN, or a simple keyboard friendly passphrase." So, although the phone's operating system may be protected, the level of data security on the phone presumes that iOS won't be hacked.

    He showed how he was able to unroll the encryption on the OneSafe app using a single command line. OneSafe has since worked with Zdziarski and fixed the problem. But, he said, there are credit card processing apps that are much worse. He refused to name which ones to protect the personal data of the people using those apps...
    morganplus8 and barnyr like this.
    08-08-12 10:39 PM
  8. Tank1978's Avatar
    Those are some stunningly dense coworkers you have if their inability to comprehend the difference between an actual hack and a human being in a call center dropping the ball is going to cause them to change their devices.
    Actually i would say they're smart if they're jumping off the Apple bandwagon..
    FMB8900 likes this.
    08-08-12 10:51 PM
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