1. A_Aviator_A's Avatar
    I know Google pushed Android as an open source concept but in reality they do have licensing deals with hardware manufacturers. I believe they collect licensing fees from use of the OS. Even though third party app code is owned by the respective developers, there has to be some type of proprietary association with the Google ecosystem.

    Blackberry is now tapping into their app catalog and offering this content directly. Does anyone know how Android runtime works from a legal perspective? Did BB cut a licensing cheque to Google? Is there a chance at some point that Google could legally challenge Blackberry over this functionality on the basis of unfair competition?

    I doubt Blackberry would do this if it wasn't 100% legal.
    What have you heard?
    07-01-14 10:13 AM
  2. howarmat's Avatar
    its legal. Remember the real thing that matters is google play services. You have agreements and certain conditions to be met to have access to those
    07-01-14 10:22 AM
  3. TheScionicMan's Avatar
    The licensing fees that are paid by Android manufacturers goes to Microsoft to avoid patent infringement claims
    07-01-14 10:31 AM
  4. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    The Android Runtime is built from the open-source Android, so there's nothing about it that is illegal or in violation of anything.

    However, the Android Runtime is not a full implementation of Android per Google's requirements, and so it doesn't qualify for Google Certification, which is one of several requirements to get access to the Google Services Framework and to Google Play. Thus, BB has no officially-authorized access to the Play Store.

    Snap, which pulls apps out of the Play Store, is at the very least violating the Play Store's Terms Of Service (TOS), and may be breaking the law as well. Google has yet to take "official" notice of it, probably because BB hasn't endorsed in directly in any mature market. However, over the last couple of years, they have been increasingly been giving developers motivation to integrate Google Services Framework into their apps, and such apps (at least, the versions from the Play Store), won't work on non-Google-Certified phones, from BB, Tizen, Jolla Sailfish, Nokia X, or Firefox.

    Google Play is not the only source for Android apps, though. Nothing prevents a developer from taking his Play Store Android app and porting it to use another store's resources and pay mechanisms. This is exactly what developers do when they put their app in the Amazon marketplace, or for that matter, into BB World. If it's a free app, developers can even make their APK available on their own websites.

    Google's Play Store is the main focus, though, with over a billion monthly active users. And many devs don't port their apps to other stores because then they have to maintain multiple forks of their app and have to re-test everything on multiple forks every time they do an update. Depending on how deeply their app uses Google services, just porting it can be considerable work and time, and many devs would rather spend that time supporting and enhancing their Play Store app, which makes them a lot more money, than supporting niche versions on other markets. Other apps are very easy to port, so devs go ahead and do so, and may have their app in multiple markets.

    So, it's a complicated question that requires specific examples to come up with an answer.
    07-01-14 11:42 AM
  5. anon1727506's Avatar
    Snap, which pulls apps out of the Play Store, is at the very least violating the Play Store's Terms Of Service (TOS), and may be breaking the law as well. Google has yet to take "official" notice of it, probably because BB hasn't endorsed in directly in any mature market. However, over the last couple of years, they have been increasingly been giving developers motivation to integrate Google Services Framework into their apps, and such apps (at least, the versions from the Play Store), won't work on non-Google-Certified phones, from BB, Tizen, Jolla Sailfish, Nokia X, or Firefox.
    Just imagine Google sending out notification to users that their accounts will be closed if they continue to use SNAP.... or worse they just close them.
    07-01-14 11:50 AM
  6. playbookster's Avatar
    I hope that ART just becomes the standard in which apps are developed so we don't have all these stupid stores with different Dev codes. Apps for all. Let phones compete on their operating systems vs how many apps they have.

    The GIF Exchange C001B7B16?
    07-01-14 11:55 AM
  7. Raestloz's Avatar
    Android Runtime is built upon AOSP, so it's 100% legal.

    The question is not whether Google will do something about it or not, it's when they finally complete the move. They've been blocking other implementations of AOSP by pushing Play Services, and now they're pushing another runtime (named Android Runtime), which will deprecate Dalvik and surely one day will cause headache for other companies such as BlackBerry and Amazon to support earlier devices.

    But in its current incarnation, Google cannot sue BlackBerry for anything

    Z10 STL100-1/10.2.1.3175
    07-01-14 12:01 PM

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