1. chiefbroski's Avatar
    I was just wondering if there are some regulations regarding the future (insert number here)G naming? Like what if some company pulled a douchy move and called their phones the "Omicron 7G" or something baller like that, with it being only 4G or something. Can they legally do this? Is it just frowned upon? Would they be just throwing their credibility out the window?

    Cause I would imagine lots of people who don't know enough on the subject could be confused and think its super new and fast. I mean, all the carriers jump on the "our-3G-is-now-4G" bus and pretty much forced the redefinition of 4G. so why can't they or some manufacturers claim 5G or higher?

    Disclaimer: Not suggesting they do this, but just wondering what if. Thanks.
    08-15-11 08:53 AM
  2. howarmat's Avatar
    08-15-11 09:21 AM
  3. chiefbroski's Avatar
    Thanks, but I've read that article already, Although they talk about 4G and the nomenclature, there is no talk about the general "G" nomenclature which seems to be done by just preparing the definition of the next generation network.

    There is no clear definition of 5G, although there are reports suggesting what 5G could be. For example, Apple could call their phone the iPhone 5G, and it would be super douchy, but probably perfectly legal (correct me if I'm wrong). Soooo many of their customers would think its the fastest phone around as all the other phones are only 4G.
    08-15-11 09:33 AM
  4. howarmat's Avatar
    whatever "g" it is the ITU would regulate it which is what you where asking about right? whatever company that wants to advertise "5g" would have to go thru them still i would guess
    chiefbroski likes this.
    08-15-11 09:40 AM
  5. chiefbroski's Avatar
    whatever "g" it is the ITU would regulate it which is what you where asking about right? whatever company that wants to advertise "5g" would have to go thru them still i would guess
    Sweet. Thanks bro.
    08-15-11 09:42 AM
  6. mjordan5's Avatar
    I believe it also comes down to how much people are into the Tech world or whatever you would like to call it. Because most people that are more into Tech then others would know that just because its called the ...... 5g doesn't neccesarily means it has 5g service. But for those that aren't really into tech just buy a phone because it has a certain status symbol they might be lead to believe that it is 5g if they don't do there homework on it. But I would not believe that it is illegal unless they are actually advertising that it runs on a "5g" network but in reality only runs a 4g then they might have problems. But if they just give a device a name that has 5g in it I wouldn't think that is illegal. Just my thought on it could be wrong just what I believe. Mike
    chiefbroski likes this.
    08-15-11 09:42 AM
  7. Fnord's Avatar
    I mean, all the carriers jump on the "our-3G-is-now-4G" bus and pretty much forced the redefinition of 4G.
    You have it backwards, it was the ITU that updated their definition of HSPA+ to 4G, thus allowing the carriers to change their marketing. It wasn't the other way around...
    08-15-11 10:07 AM
  8. Amy wineBerry's Avatar
    Since there is no 5G(and up) market at the moment to confuse consumers, I think anyone can name a product, ex. iPhone 5G, whatever they like. The problem will come in advertising features. So long as they do not claim that the device runs on that mythical network, it's likely perfectly legal.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    mjordan5 and chiefbroski like this.
    08-15-11 10:18 AM
  9. chiefbroski's Avatar
    You have it backwards, it was the ITU that updated their definition of HSPA+ to 4G, thus allowing the carriers to change their marketing. It wasn't the other way around...
    I thought it was the carriers in the States who were quick to their networks as as 4G, and hence the carriers in canada called their HSPA+ and LTE networks as 4G which they really aren't. The ITU then decided to update their definition. I don't think the ITU hasn't even upgraded the definition yet, only decided to do it soon.

    EDIT: And you know Apple could confuse the majority of their customers that their phone is just faster by calling it the iPhone 5G even though never saying it runs on a 5G network.
    08-15-11 11:12 AM
  10. HeezyBear's Avatar
    People often refer to products with the G in reference to that specific product's own generation. For example, people often say iPod Touch 4G. Obviously this doesn't mean the iPod Touch is 4G telecommunications capable. They simply do this to easily differentiate what device they're speaking of. I doubt Apple would market their device as an iPhone 5G, but that won't stop people from writing it that way to refer to the 5th generation of iPhone and then other people confusing it to mean 5G in reference to telecommunications standards.
    08-15-11 11:22 AM
  11. _StephenBB81's Avatar
    Since there is no 5G(and up) market at the moment to confuse consumers, I think anyone can name a product, ex. iPhone 5G, whatever they like. The problem will come in advertising features. So long as they do not claim that the device runs on that mythical network, it's likely perfectly legal.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    That was basically What I was going to post.
    As long as 5G isn't trade marked anyone can use it in their device today if they wanted. RIM could make a BlackBerry 5G for a 2G market, as long as they don't say it runs on a 5G network they are not breaking any laws, they just can not advertise with the intent on confusing the customers.

    It is like the Pontiac G5, isn't a 5 Cyl car with the G6 being a 6 Cyl car, they are just naming conventions.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Amy wineBerry likes this.
    08-15-11 01:29 PM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD