1. FF22's Avatar
    If the following thread, someone has suggested a potential hack for the verizon lock on the gps:

    http://forums.crackberry.com/f61/gps...9/index85.html

    messages particularly: 1267 and 1269

    Might one of you gps programmers, like Black* or other see if you understand the hack? And if it in fact works?
    05-09-09 11:07 PM
  2. 3z3k13l's Avatar
    Verizon actually put out an update about 3 weeks ago that unlocks the gps feature.
    05-12-09 10:54 PM
  3. HouseApe's Avatar
    If the following thread, someone has suggested a potential hack for the verizon lock on the gps:

    http://forums.crackberry.com/f61/gps...9/index85.html

    messages particularly: 1267 and 1269

    Might one of you gps programmers, like Black* or other see if you understand the hack? And if it in fact works?

    Its not a hack its the actual User ID and Password needed for 3rd party App's to access the PDE server. Unless your a programmer this is unusable info.
    05-13-09 12:49 AM
  4. FF22's Avatar
    Well, yes, that is why I suggested one of the gps programmers give it a try.
    05-13-09 10:31 AM
  5. cook46933's Avatar
    If the following thread, someone has suggested a potential hack for the verizon lock on the gps:

    http://forums.crackberry.com/f61/gps...9/index85.html

    messages particularly: 1267 and 1269

    Might one of you gps programmers, like Black* or other see if you understand the hack? And if it in fact works?
    Hmmm had not seen this before. But my issue would be legal liability that I know I would not want to get into. I hate lawyers ...
    05-13-09 12:18 PM
  6. FF22's Avatar
    Hmmm had not seen this before. But my issue would be legal liability that I know I would not want to get into. I hate lawyers ...
    I was hoping *YOU* might see this. I did wonder about Verizon's reaction but if it were "reversed engineered" it might be okay.

    But what if, YOU TRY IT and just let us know if it works. You don't have to share the actual program - just the outcome.

    And besides, what's the big deal if you go up on charges of violating the Digital Millennium Act!!!!
    05-13-09 03:59 PM
  7. Thyth's Avatar
    It would be nice if you mentioned the name of the person who spent the time to crack what nobody else could, rather than referring to a generic "someone". Continued observation of this common courtesy is the only reason I give some away things like that for free.

    That "hack" is indeed Verizon's credentials for VZNavigator used to authorize PDE access on their network. Normally, every application approved by Verizon for PDE access has its own application ID number, and its own password.

    Those credentials are supposed to be known only to the application developer, so they aren't used in applications that aren't approved (especially since the PDE system on the Verizon side seems incapable of distinguishing which application uses the given PDE credentials).

    It's a security system that breaks down rather rapidly when people like me are introduced.
    05-13-09 04:52 PM
  8. exmeaguy's Avatar
    Verizon actually put out an update about 3 weeks ago that unlocks the gps feature.
    And what exactly is the update since this is the first that I have heard anything about this?
    05-13-09 04:53 PM
  9. cook46933's Avatar
    I was hoping *YOU* might see this. I did wonder about Verizon's reaction but if it were "reversed engineered" it might be okay.

    But what if, YOU TRY IT and just let us know if it works. You don't have to share the actual program - just the outcome.

    And besides, what's the big deal if you go up on charges of violating the Digital Millennium Act!!!!
    Well, after being detained by the bomb squad while geocaching, I think I am on a list somewhere
    05-13-09 06:33 PM
  10. FF22's Avatar
    It would be nice if you mentioned the name of the person who spent the time to crack what nobody else could, rather than referring to a generic "someone". Continued observation of this common courtesy is the only reason I give some away things like that for free.

    That "hack" is indeed Verizon's credentials for VZNavigator used to authorize PDE access on their network. Normally, every application approved by Verizon for PDE access has its own application ID number, and its own password.

    Those credentials are supposed to be known only to the application developer, so they aren't used in applications that aren't approved (especially since the PDE system on the Verizon side seems incapable of distinguishing which application uses the given PDE credentials).

    It's a security system that breaks down rather rapidly when people like me are introduced.
    Did not mean to offend just trying to not repeat a thread, I tried pointing to the thread and I may not be good at that. Actually, I was also trying to post fast since I thought that Mods might actually delete that type of info so I started a thread to highlight it. So, sorry.

    I was wondering, like Cook, if there might be legal ramifications to using this info.
    05-14-09 01:16 AM
  11. Thyth's Avatar
    Of course there can be. If someone with plenty of well paid lawyers doesn't like what you're doing, they can give you a hard time, even if there is no law prohibiting what you're doing.

    In the case of reverse engineering Verizon's Navigator program, the only mention of prohibition of reverse engineering is in Verizon's site agreement, which states: you may not "decompile, reverse engineer, modify or disassemble any of the software in or associated with the network and/or server;". It is ambiguous as to whether this applies to the software downloaded from the page, as it is most likely to be interpreted as software the server is running to serve pages to users. Additionally, reading the website use/terms/conditions is not required in order to download the VZNavigator software for the BlackBerry. I encountered no agreement between the download, extraction of the BlackBerry module, and examination of source code. There very well may be an agreement displayed to the user after installation of the software on a wireless handheld which stipulates that reverse engineering is prohibited, but as I have never installed or used VZNavigator, I cannot be subject to an agreement I have never seen/read. No cryptographic countermeasures were circumvented in the process of reverse engineering, so it's clear as far as anti-circumvention in the US DMCA.

    So, legally, ultimately it comes down to whether the website terms are applicable to the software downloaded, and whether the agreement is enforceable, since acceptance was not required prior, or post download.

    Still, Verizon could give application developers a hard time if they suspect you're using PDE credentials designated to another application.
    05-14-09 01:43 PM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD