1. bbsstmez's Avatar
    Curious, does anyone know which OS's are safest?
    09-24-13 07:10 PM
  2. RoccoI's Avatar
    Blackberry or webos.
    Dude_9 likes this.
    09-24-13 08:03 PM
  3. howarmat's Avatar
    depends on the user lol
    09-24-13 08:18 PM
  4. Dave Bourque's Avatar
    Definitely not Android...

    Posted via CB10
    09-24-13 08:23 PM
  5. Richard Buckley's Avatar
    Strictly my opinion, in decreasing order:
    BlackBerry
    WP8
    iOS
    Android

    Posted via CB10
    09-24-13 08:46 PM
  6. bbsstmez's Avatar
    I am looking for fact based opinions. A friend told me iphone and I was supprised
    09-25-13 06:38 AM
  7. MarcelQ10's Avatar
    None. As far as I know, the NSA was able to hack every phone according to documents leaked by Snowden. Even BlackBerry was hacked also, even it was FIPS certified (BB10).
    09-25-13 07:03 AM
  8. sentano's Avatar
    Here's my version of a SAFE phone:
    *pull the battery (if you're lucky and it's removable)
    *pull the SIM card
    *wrap the phone in several layers of aluminum foil (try the good thick stuff, not the cheap thin one)

    ..now you have a SAFE phone...

    LOL

    garrett1972 and junior2you like this.
    09-25-13 07:09 AM
  9. Daytona123's Avatar
    I was reading a news article about how prone the mobile OSs are to viruses, etc. From what I remember, iPhone had the highest concentration of viruses and malware, followed by Android and then BlackBerry. I don't remember if they mentioned WP or not. I'll see if I can find and link the article. I think it was on Yahoo.
    09-25-13 08:51 AM
  10. Richard Buckley's Avatar
    I am looking for fact based opinions. A friend told me iphone and I was supprised
    Well my opinions are based on facts. We may however differ on the weighting given to the facts. This is what I consider when assessing the security of a system:

    1. The robustness of the operating system. I judge this by the number of detected faults that may lead to vulnerabilities, the number of actual vulnerabilities either responsibly disclosed or found in the wild and the speed that the OS curator is able to make patches available.
    2. Security of the code execution process. Does the system provide a secure trusted boot procedure, how far does the chain of trust and verification go (boot loader, OS components, Application layer)?
    3. Security of the echo system. How easy is it to introduce malware or fake applications into the application supply system? Is the echo system scanned by an independant software security provider?
    4. User input and application output trust level. What level of protection on user input is enforced? Can an application be sure that input provided is from the user? Can the user be sure that input is going only to the intended application? Can the user be sure that the output is from the application it is supposed to be from?
    5. Is the encryption and certificate checking implemented properly on the device.


    How national intelligence and law enforcement agencies may be able to require or coerce providers into providing access to our data aside (there is very little an individual can do about this in the short term, and the situation may be not as bad as, as bad as or far worse than the Snowden leaks imply), it is still important to keep financial and personal data out of the hands of criminals, fraudsters and identity thieves.
    09-25-13 09:33 AM
  11. bbsstmez's Avatar
    Well my opinions are based on facts. We may however differ on the weighting given to the facts. This is what I consider when assessing the security of a system:

    1. The robustness of the operating system. I judge this by the number of detected faults that may lead to vulnerabilities, the number of actual vulnerabilities either responsibly disclosed or found in the wild and the speed that the OS curator is able to make patches available.
    2. Security of the code execution process. Does the system provide a secure trusted boot procedure, how far does the chain of trust and verification go (boot loader, OS components, Application layer)?
    3. Security of the echo system. How easy is it to introduce malware or fake applications into the application supply system? Is the echo system scanned by an independant software security provider?
    4. User input and application output trust level. What level of protection on user input is enforced? Can an application be sure that input provided is from the user? Can the user be sure that input is going only to the intended application? Can the user be sure that the output is from the application it is supposed to be from?
    5. Is the encryption and certificate checking implemented properly on the device.


    How national intelligence and law enforcement agencies may be able to require or coerce providers into providing access to our data aside (there is very little an individual can do about this in the short term, and the situation may be not as bad as, as bad as or far worse than the Snowden leaks imply), it is still important to keep financial and personal data out of the hands of criminals, fraudsters and identity thieves.
    Thank you!
    09-25-13 10:07 AM
  12. bbsstmez's Avatar
    None. As far as I know, the NSA was able to hack every phone according to documents leaked by Snowden. Even BlackBerry was hacked also, even it was FIPS certified (BB10).
    Most people are not NSA! Also, spyware is different that hacking, which is more of what NSA does, unless I am misunderstanding
    09-25-13 10:08 AM
  13. Dave Bourque's Avatar
    None. As far as I know, the NSA was able to hack every phone according to documents leaked by Snowden. Even BlackBerry was hacked also, even it was FIPS certified (BB10).

    Again NSA is the great exception. These guys have the money and resources to break anything. They are actually most likely using quantum computing to decrypt the most difficult encryptions.

    Posted via CB10
    09-25-13 10:15 AM
  14. SoxFan's Avatar
    How easy is it for calls to be intercepted? With old cell phone technology, I know you had to worry that your calls were being heard. I don;t think that's the case anymore?
    09-25-13 11:47 AM
  15. bbsstmez's Avatar
    How easy is it for calls to be intercepted? With old cell phone technology, I know you had to worry that your calls were being heard. I don;t think that's the case anymore?
    I was not asking about call interception. My question was spyware, when installing apps having spyware installed that sends personal data to the creator of the spyware
    09-25-13 12:20 PM
  16. BoldBigWorm's Avatar
    NSA is Google/Android.....

    Posted via CB Q-10
    09-25-13 12:25 PM

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