10-12-15 11:57 AM
38 12
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  1. johnnyuk's Avatar
    The way I think BlackBerry are approaching privacy on the Priv is that anything sensitive is supposed to be in the Android for Work container, this is primarily a work phone after all, not a consumer play.

    BlackBerry have taken the view that when you take the phone home with you at the end of your work day or at the weekend and you're doing your "consumer" things with it all that data will be outside of that container just like with Balance in BBOS and BlackBerry 10, and it's all fair game for Google just as with any other Google compliant Android device.

    This is the price we pay for easy access to Google Play and all its juicy wares.

    Posted from the CB10 app on my BlackBerry Z30 STA100-2/10.3.2.2639 on O2 UK - Activated on BES10.2.6.28
    10-02-15 09:46 PM
  2. Omnitech's Avatar
    BlackBerry have taken the view that when you take the phone home with you at the end of your work day or at the weekend and you're doing your "consumer" things with it all that data will be outside of that container just like with Balance in BBOS and BlackBerry 10, and it's all fair game for Google just as with any other Google compliant Android device.
    Which, if true, is exactly what I fear it will be: the only entity they are truly protecting are their traditional corporate/government customers.

    Individual citizens need protection from sleazy platforms (Google and Android), sleazy employers, sleazy governments, and other sleazy companies like exploitative app developers, snoopery online businesses of all kinds, etc etc. Not to mention good old lone-wolf hackers and organized crime groups.

    I'm not convinced that this will be the solution to any one of those things. We shall see.
    johnnyuk likes this.
    10-02-15 10:36 PM
  3. the1's Avatar
    Which, if true, is exactly what I fear it will be: the only entity they are truly protecting are their traditional corporate/government customers.

    Individual citizens need protection from sleazy platforms (Google and Android), sleazy employers, sleazy governments, and other sleazy companies like exploitative app developers, snoopery online businesses of all kinds, etc etc. Not to mention good old lone-wolf hackers and organized crime groups.

    I'm not convinced that this will be the solution to any one of those things. We shall see.
    As we can clearly see, for apps, people will ignore these things.
    10-03-15 12:47 AM
  4. johnnyuk's Avatar
    Which, if true, is exactly what I fear it will be: the only entity they are truly protecting are their traditional corporate/government customers.
    I hope I'm wrong but we've seen nothing from BlackBerry that tells me a consumer's privacy will be respected more on the Priv outside of the secure container that's part of the Android 5.1+ OS compared to any other Google compliant Android phone. However, we haven't really heard very much from BlackBerry yet about the Priv, maybe they can surprise us soon.

    One silver lining is that you don't have to use BES12 to manage Android for Work. So where BlackBerry have been ignoring small businesses, and by small I mean from single person IT consultancy to a few people in an office with no on-site or cloud based servers running Exchange for email, you could use the Priv with A.N. Other cloud based MDM/EMM solution supporting Android for Work that does actually consider the circumstances of real small businesses in the modern world. Then you have the secure container to put your apps in and do your consumer stuff in with (hopefully!) more privacy than you'll have outside of it.

    Obviously that no longer includes Good Technology as BlackBerry are going to buy that so expect their small business friendliness to go right of the window soon.


    Posted from the CB10 app on my BlackBerry Z30 STA100-2/10.3.2.2639 on O2 UK - Activated on BES10.2.6.28
    10-03-15 06:54 AM
  5. The Big Picture's Avatar
    Can't wait to find out.

    Posted via CB10
    10-05-15 02:49 PM
  6. ImBerryCurious's Avatar
    Reality is, however, that most government officials are using legacy hardware and software. Obama, I believe, was using a Bold for the longest time. So was Hilary Clinton. You don't hear about Q10s getting hacked. Not because they are just that secure, but because no one is really using them.
    10-05-15 05:38 PM
  7. scorepion's Avatar
    If BlackBerry tells you how they are guarding your phone then they are actually putting your protection in danger. These things cannot be disclosed . They must remain secret for obvious reasons. :-P

    Posted via CB10
    Security by obscurity is a big no-no

    Posted via CB10
    10-05-15 06:23 PM
  8. jhanks64's Avatar
    I think of most Android as having the Google Privacy Rape always going on. I'm hopeful that the Priv will prevent most of that or at least allow the user more control than other versions of Android.

    Posted Via CB10 on my BlackBerry Passport
    10-05-15 06:27 PM
  9. The Big Picture's Avatar
    Reality is, however, that most government officials are using legacy hardware and software. Obama, I believe, was using a Bold for the longest time. So was Hilary Clinton. You don't hear about Q10s getting hacked. Not because they are just that secure, but because no one is really using them.
    Merkel uses a Z10 and so does the swedish prime minister.

    Posted via CB10
    10-06-15 02:37 AM
  10. BB Adict's Avatar
    Reality is, however, that most government officials are using legacy hardware and software. Obama, I believe, was using a Bold for the longest time. So was Hilary Clinton. You don't hear about Q10s getting hacked. Not because they are just that secure, but because no one is really using them.
    Not too smart with the logic. If Obama, Clinton and many other heads of state use the Blackberry, that would be all the reason why they would be the target of hackers.

    Why would a hacker go after some one like Paris Hylton, and not Obama for useful information?

    Posted via CB10
    10-06-15 04:17 AM
  11. Omnitech's Avatar
    Reality is, however, that most government officials are using legacy hardware and software. Obama, I believe, was using a Bold for the longest time. So was Hilary Clinton. You don't hear about Q10s getting hacked. Not because they are just that secure, but because no one is really using them.

    My understanding about the US government officials is that USGOV had invested quite a bit of man-hours and money into developing a multi-polar Blackberry security solution which happened to be based on BBOS, so this is why they were using BBOS devices. I don't think they wanted to re-invent that wheel until they had some idea that BB10 was here to stay. Which turned out to be very prudent.

    BB10 devices are in fact more secure than most "consumer" smartphones, but you are right that the very small numbers made is also one reason why you don't hear about them being hacked very much.



    Why would a hacker go after some one like Paris Hylton[sic], and not Obama for useful information?
    Probably because they are about 10,000 times more likely to actually gain access to Paris Hilton's data.

    Which is actually far more useful than trying to break in to your smartphone, because Paris Hilton knows or is somehow connected to far more powerful/important people than you are.
    10-11-15 10:42 PM
  12. ImBerryCurious's Avatar
    And I whole heartedly agree. This is also the reason the military shelled out big bucks to extend support for Windows XP. I also believe that many corporations shared the same sentiment for a while. And when it became apparent that a change needed to happen, as you said, there seemed to be a question as to whether or not BlackBerry would even exist in a matter of years. So, they moved on to iPhone and Android. So, those were the operating systems that became important to understand.
    10-12-15 04:27 AM
  13. Omnitech's Avatar
    And when it became apparent that a change needed to happen, as you said, there seemed to be a question as to whether or not BlackBerry would even exist in a matter of years. So, they moved on to iPhone and Android. So, those were the operating systems that became important to understand.
    Actually BlackBerry was the first device to be approved in most of those gov/mil agencies even in the post-BBOS days, and I believe in most of those agencies, Blackberries (both BBOS and BB10) are still very common to this day and quite possibly still the largest-deployed platform for secure "consumer type" devices. (My figures may be a bit out of date, anyone with concrete up to date figures feel free to correct me)

    For low-security purposes, there are definitely more and more other devices being put into place. Especially products like tablets where Blackberry has no competitive product now anyway.
    10-12-15 11:57 AM
38 12

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