11-13-15 11:31 AM
103 ... 2345
tools
  1. paulwallace1234's Avatar
    Just asking questions. You would have to be a half wit not to know that this is going on in the Apps especially Android Apps. Hmmm, BlackBerry is putting Dtek on every Priv. There has to be a licensing agreement with the Dev. and probably can dictate to the Dev. what they would like to see in the App. Your a Dev. isn't this true?

    BlackBerry 10 or nothing!
    I don't think there have to be any agreements, DTEK will be monitoring the API calls and logging successful ones, that's not modifying anything, just reading values (educated guess).

    Personally, I would be all for seeing the usage of as many permissions as securely possible, I may be a developer but I am also still a consumer.
    11-11-15 08:35 AM
  2. Zidentia's Avatar
    In an another life I was a "hacker" and I programmed for a living. I worked with several game companies and ran my own for several years. What passes for coding now is pathetic. People use prepackaged code and pick A and deselect B. No skill required. No one knows how to work with C or assembly anymore. They fail to do the work and try to turn a quick buck. This is why your apps suck at optimization and are bloated heaping messes of dung.

    I have used Android briefly and I have seen a lot of the code and it is quite the debacle. They are getting better at cleaning it up but the core is not the best. In addition the app phenomenon is just an appendage of the freemium model where they sell your data plain and simple. We all know this but still we complain.

    Nothing is free and good programming takes time to create a workable program that has minimal bugs/errors. Dtek is a decent data capture routine that is similar to other programs that have been around for years on other platforms. It is to inform so the user can decide how much information you are willing to give away.

    Posted via the Android CrackBerry App!
    11-11-15 10:39 AM
  3. Ulferini Schusterotti's Avatar
    Don't know if it's been asked before, but can device encryption be turned OFF? I'd like to do that when I get my Priv. Also, can DTEK as an app be disabled in the app settings?

    Thanks in advance.
    11-11-15 03:36 PM
  4. campbecw's Avatar
    Look at what it's at now!!


    Attachment 380009

    Posted from my Canadian PassportSQW100-1/10.3.2.2639
    That escalated quickly

    Posted via CB10
    11-12-15 01:20 AM
  5. sorinv's Avatar
    What law, exactly, is being broken?
    Canadian privacy laws.
    You cannot take data/information from my computers, phones and store it outside the country without my permission. You cannot send me spam.
    The fact that it is ignored, doesn't make it legal.
    11-12-15 06:17 AM
  6. sorinv's Avatar
    Well I don't disagree. I was responding to the post that stated:

    Bad coding is not an excuse for illegal snooping. Grow up and learn to code if you still want to be in business and do not snoop!
    That applies to Google first and foremost.
    If you make money on my data without my willing permission (that means no negative options) your are a thief!
    As simple as that.


    That statement is stupid. You click the box that says yes steal all my info so I can fly some stupid duck through a bunch of plumbing pipes or load some I hope I get laid app...........ITS YOUR FAULT. Not Google or Nasa or Kaos.

    I just think people are a little two damn entitled nowadays and expect the world to bend over and cater to whatever stupid thing they want to be excused for next.

    Oh and just for chits and gigglies....life still goes on if you don't own a smartphone. People can have a regular old phone, a landline even, use a calculator to make change for a dollar (a pet peeve of mine) and a daytimer or gum wrapper to keep track of their oh so busy, I'm super productive, hey everybody....look at my unique Passport phone.....schedule.

    Now where's my beer?
    I think you have a great time imagining things.
    I DON't USE android.
    I don't click on the agreement button.
    I don't want free apps.
    I buy products whose price I know.

    I am here simply to understand if BlackBerry and Chen can rightly claim that the user has PRIVACY on the Priv.
    Don't worry about me! I am also here to understand what choices I will have when BB10 is discontinued.
    You think that companies like Google are entitled to our data.
    If they were honest and had nothing to hide, they would put a price on their service and not steal data.
    I don't need or use apps whose permissions I cannot turn off.
    11-12-15 06:32 AM
  7. Elephant_Canyon's Avatar
    Canadian privacy laws.
    You cannot take data/information from my computers, phones and store it outside the country without my permission. You cannot send me spam.
    Hmmm, this prompted me to look into Canadian data privacy laws. Too bad PIPEDA doesn't have any teeth (if Wikipedia is to be trusted on the matter).

    I am here simply to understand if BlackBerry and Chen can rightly claim that the user has PRIVACY on the Priv.
    They cannot make that claim.

    I don't need or use apps whose permissions I cannot turn off.
    Then stick with BB10, or get an iPhone. Or a phone running Android M.
    11-12-15 06:59 AM
  8. dalight13's Avatar
    That escalated quickly

    Posted via CB10
    Its at 9k now

    Posted from my BlackBerry Priv
    11-12-15 07:14 AM
  9. byex's Avatar
    You think that companies like Google are entitled to our data.
    If they were honest and had nothing to hide, they would put a price on their service and not steal data.
    I don't need or use apps whose permissions I cannot turn off.
    Look into Google business model and revenue stream. Then rethink what you posted.

    Posted via CB10
    11-12-15 07:16 AM
  10. sorinv's Avatar
    Hmmm, this prompted me to look into Canadian data privacy laws. Too bad PIPEDA doesn't have any teeth (if Wikipedia is to be trusted on the matter).



    They cannot make that claim.



    Then stick with BB10, or get an iPhone. Or a phone running Android M.
    What is your problem? I never said I was going to switch from Bb10. I don't use android, microsoft, apple. I only use linux and BlackBerry.
    However, Chen is trying to force us all to go to android. At some point my passport and Z30 batteries will run out. I am here to figure out when I get my backup passport SE before they disappear like Z30 seems to have.

    And here's a link of interest:

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/in...laws-1.2992125


    And an even older one:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/7428833.stm
    Last edited by sorinv; 11-12-15 at 08:31 AM.
    11-12-15 07:18 AM
  11. sorinv's Avatar
    Look into Google business model and revenue stream. Then rethink what you posted.

    Posted via CB10
    It is not clear what you want to say, but just in case, I don't use Google search and I clean after any search I do. I know how Google operates.
    11-12-15 07:20 AM
  12. midnightdoom's Avatar
    So much paranoia! If you've never developed software, I guess that could excuse it...

    Most of these accesses are due to features of the app that you WANT. Where the counts are WAY high doesn't mean anyone is snooping! It's much much more likely some poor coding, and a lookup that maybe needs to be done once per conversation is in the wrong place and is bring done per entered line. Or worse, bad coding that causes the app to cycle through your entire address book rather than doing a proper inquiry.

    I've seen programs on large servers that were coded so as to access a database 10,000 times needlessly... one line of code in the wrong place....


    Posted via CB10
    To me it's not so much a paranoia thing.. I don't like apps needlessly running in the background pulling data and wasting my battery and hogging my ram..

    That's one reason I liked BB10 and another I'm looking forward to marshmallow so I can disable these apps from running when I don't want them active.

    This to me is more of a tool to help me see which apps are using more battery, data etc so I can reconsider if I really need the App..

    Most times I just resort to bookmarking the Web pages to lots of services for the browser so it still feels like an app because the apps are too intrusive

    *-* BBM Channel : Netflix Newsroom C003BA5E3 | Facebook.com/NetflixNewsroom *-*
    11-12-15 08:01 AM
  13. dphjeff's Avatar
    Look into Google business model and revenue stream. Then rethink what you posted.

    Posted via CB10
    95% of Google income comes from advertising. Hmmm? So how can they prove or justify there customers return on investment. Why yes mine users of the product information. See where they are, listen and watch there conversations, see who and how many times they call someone, see how many time they used an App, see what movie and music they watch and listen to, and so on. The sad part about it is most people are happy with this. Or at least until it affects there life and then it's not harmless. You can subscribe to this and say it will save BlackBerry because this is what the masses want. The real question is who is going to save us as a society when it's to late. At least with BB10 we have some control. It may not be perfect or even mainstream but without it what are we left with?
    11-12-15 09:06 AM
  14. djsvet's Avatar
    To me it's not so much a paranoia thing.. I don't like apps needlessly running in the background pulling data and wasting my battery and hogging my ram..

    That's one reason I liked BB10 and another I'm looking forward to marshmallow so I can disable these apps from running when I don't want them active.

    This to me is more of a tool to help me see which apps are using more battery, data etc so I can reconsider if I really need the App..

    Most times I just resort to bookmarking the Web pages to lots of services for the browser so it still feels like an app because the apps are too intrusive

    *-* BBM Channel : Netflix Newsroom C003BA5E3 | Facebook.com/NetflixNewsroom *-*
    Unfortunately, you can't disable "run in background " in Marshmallow. Google isn't that stupid.

    Posted via CB10
    11-12-15 10:16 AM
  15. byex's Avatar
    95% of Google income comes from advertising. Hmmm? So how can they prove or justify there customers return on investment. Why yes mine users of the product information. See where they are, listen and watch there conversations, see who and how many times they call someone, see how many time they used an App, see what movie and music they watch and listen to, and so on. The sad part about it is most people are happy with this. Or at least until it affects there life and then it's not harmless. You can subscribe to this and say it will save BlackBerry because this is what the masses want. The real question is who is going to save us as a society when it's to late. At least with BB10 we have some control. It may not be perfect or even mainstream but without it what are we left with?
    Agreed.
    You choose to use Android and Google services that's the price you pay. The masses have spoken. Majority don't give a rats a*s about security and privacy. A quick look through social media will show you that.

    Data is the new currency.

    Posted via CB10
    dphjeff likes this.
    11-12-15 11:26 AM
  16. hbelkin's Avatar
    I've been in the industry for a long time... I have one question: if collected data can't identify the user, but just patterns, then what's the harm?

    If you use a grocery store loyalty card, or any store card, you're also providing the same information. In fact, when you go shopping and let them scan your products, that information is sold to companies that aggregate and analyze it. I used to work for one of the biggest such firms.


    Posted via CB10
    Last edited by hbelkin; 11-12-15 at 04:33 PM.
    kjjb0204 likes this.
    11-12-15 03:34 PM
  17. Emaderton3's Avatar
    Exactly. And that happens with other services as well like credit cards.

    Posted via CB10
    11-12-15 03:54 PM
  18. dphjeff's Avatar
    I've been in the industry for a long time... I have one question: if collected data can't identify the user, but just patterns, then what's the harm?

    If you use a grocery store loyalty card, or any store card, you're also providing the same information. In fact, when you go shopping and let them scan your products, that information is sold to companies that aggregate and analyze it. I used to work for one of the biggest such firms.


    Posted via CB10
    I don't use loyalty card. Christ if you had one for every store that pushed them stupid things you would have to push around a wheel barrel. I just tell the cashier to scan the card behind the register.
    Last edited by dphjeff; 11-12-15 at 05:15 PM.
    11-12-15 04:56 PM
  19. sorinv's Avatar
    I've been in the industry for a long time... I have one question: if collected data can't identify the user, but just patterns, then what's the harm?

    If you use a grocery store loyalty card, or any store card, you're also providing the same information. In fact, when you go shopping and let them scan your products, that information is sold to companies that aggregate and analyze it. I used to work for one of the biggest such firms.


    Posted via CB10
    But I don't use a store card, for the same reason. Loyalty cards and flyers are just a marketing scheme to give people something to waste their efforts on and attract them to more business.

    Google, facebook, linked-in, NSA et al have figured out the way to get people to work for them for free, to do the data collection for free and, in some cases (like Apple), to pay dearly to get their own data collected.
    Such is the stupidity and ignorance that 99.5% of the people in society have reached since the year 2000.
    Last edited by sorinv; 11-12-15 at 06:46 PM.
    11-12-15 06:30 PM
  20. Emaderton3's Avatar
    But I don't use a store card, for the same reason. Loyalty cards and flyers are just a marketing scheme to give people something to waste their efforts on and attract them to more business.
    But you can save money on groceries. Whether they are pushing specific items or not, if they are what you want and buy, why not use a card? We save over 10% typically and earn points for discounts on our gas. And their pumps already have the lowest prices in town. They can use our spending habits! Keep sending us targeted coupons on things we already buy anyway!

    Posted via CB10
    11-12-15 06:40 PM
  21. sorinv's Avatar
    But you can save money on groceries. Whether they are pushing specific items or not, if they are what you want and buy, why not use a card? We save over 10% typically and earn points for discounts on our gas. And their pumps already have the lowest prices in town. They can use our spending habits! Keep sending us targeted coupons on things we already buy anyway!

    Posted via CB10
    You do not need a loyalty card to figure out the lowest prices.
    Again, laziness always has a price.
    It depends what you want to spend your money and data on.
    Data, information is money. It is actually everything now.
    You are your data. What you spend it on and whom you give it should be your choice only, not google's or facebook's or whoever wrote an app.
    Some people saw this coming in the 1960's. For example one of my university profs teaching semiconductor devices wrote a book on this in the 60's, way before I went to school...
    11-12-15 06:48 PM
  22. Emaderton3's Avatar
    You do not need a loyalty card to figure out the lowest prices.
    Again, laziness always has a price.
    It depends what you want to spend your money and data on.
    Data, information is money. It is actually everything now.
    You are your data. What you spend it on and whom you give it should be your choice only, not google's or facebook's or whoever wrote an app.
    Some people saw this coming in the 1960's. For example one of my university profs teaching semiconductor devices wrote a book on this in the 60's, way before I went to school...
    In my experience after shopping at other stores, the loyalty card provides the lowest price on the items we buy. Plus it often coincides with coupons providing prices that simply cannot be matched. I have done my homework despite my "laziness."

    And your professor may have forecasted the future, but perhaps he/she could not have provided all the details. Being a prof myself, I can appreciate theories being stated well before their time such as the seed and soil hypoothesis regarding cancer. But, we are still trying to figure out exactly how it works.

    Posted via CB10
    11-12-15 07:19 PM
  23. sorinv's Avatar
    In my experience after shopping at other stores, the loyalty card provides the lowest price on the items we buy. Plus it often coincides with coupons providing prices that simply cannot be matched. I have done my homework despite my "laziness."

    Posted via CB10
    And a loyalty card should give and, likely, gives an extra discount for loyalty.

    That is not my point. My point is that you give away your shopping information in exchange. That is likely worth more than what you save, especially when it is aggregated by those like Google who have the unparalleled infrastructure to do so for everyone in the world and influence economic and political outcomes.

    The mere fact that BlackBerry has to move to android to make people aware of how good its hardware and software are, is also a result of this power, not of the slogan: "the market has decided".

    The market and your personal decisions and mine are affected and influenced by all this data collection and those who control it.

    As long as you are aware of all of this and YOU decide, and I am not affected by your decisions, there is nothing wrong.
    11-12-15 07:32 PM
  24. Emaderton3's Avatar
    And a loyalty card should give and, likely, gives an extra discount for loyalty.

    That is not my point. My point is that you give away your shopping information in exchange. That is likely worth more than what you save, especially when it is aggregated by those like Google who have the unparalleled infrastructure to do so for everyone in the world and influence economic and political outcomes.

    The mere fact that BlackBerry has to move to android to make people aware of how good its hardware and software are, is also a result of this power, not of the slogan: "the market has decided".

    The market and your personal decisions and mine are affected and influenced by all this data collection and those who control it.

    As long as you are aware of all of this and YOU decide, and I am not affected by your decisions, there is nothing wrong.
    So are you saying we should be paid for our data? I am saving more money than I possibly could at another store.

    Posted via CB10
    11-12-15 08:08 PM
  25. sorinv's Avatar
    It's yours to sell if you want to. It's certainly not somebody else's.
    How is that any different with ideas, patents, works of art. You produce it. You own it.
    11-13-15 01:37 AM
103 ... 2345

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