1. WT44's Avatar
    Perhaps I don't know much about it (I probably don't ;-)), but can panorama mode inherently not cope with different light exposures?
    In other words is the the exposure setting inherently "fixed" (static) after you you hit the button to start taking the pano picture????
    I just noticed that the pano mode cannot handle taking photos in nature where there is different light "strongness" due to shadow.

    For instance, if you're in the garden. Looking at a house just like in these pictures I attached, and you start taking the pano picture from your right or left where it's shadow and then move all the way to across the house, then the outcome always seems to be that the house cannot be seen at all due to overexposure. The exposure setting seems static and doesn't change while you're taking the pano pic.
    On the other hand, if you start the pano pic while aiming at the house and then move to darker more shadowy areas, then you get all darkness except for the house.

    Same happens when you're taking a pano pic (but also normal pic for that matter) in the evening of a street scene where there is a bright cigarette machine in the middle. You can only see one ball of white light.

    Is this inherent to taking pano pictures?

    And no, there is no smudge on the lens.

    Attachments:
    With pano mode the houses in these pictures would not show: it would be highly overexposed.
    Camera: Panorama mode not working flawlessly with different light exposures-house-1-012.ashx.jpgCamera: Panorama mode not working flawlessly with different light exposures-835b9628bf1d4b241b56263acb416b7d.jpg
    Last edited by WT44; 08-08-16 at 09:05 AM.
    08-08-16 08:51 AM
  2. smcv's Avatar
    yes, exposure is locked as soon as you start capturing.. otherwise you would get banding where the images are stitched together, or worse, not being able to align the frames for stitching if the shift in brightness is too high.
    if you are in a tricky lighting situation like this, I'd suggest using the exposure slider to compensate before your capture starts.
    FF22 likes this.
    08-08-16 11:45 AM
  3. WT44's Avatar
    yes, exposure is locked as soon as you start capturing.. otherwise you would get banding where the images are stitched together, or worse, not being able to align the frames for stitching if the shift in brightness is too high.
    if you are in a tricky lighting situation like this, I'd suggest using the exposure slider to compensate before your capture starts.
    Thanks, I don't have any experience with taking pano pictures with other smartphones like the iPhone or Galaxy but currently they deal with the same issues when taking pano pictures if you take a pano pic starting from: less light--->light--->very light or vice versa? Hm, would have been nice if there was a solution to start the pano pic in a darker spot of the living room and then going all across the window where the light is coming in. Unfortunately, manually changing the exposure slider doesn't often give the result I'm looking for. I guess like the French say: "c'est la vie".

    P.S. When taking a video you can turn on the light by tapping on the light bulb.
    Could this light bulb not be introduced in pano mode? Sure it won't be of help taking nature photos outdoors, but indoors in a not so well lit (living) room/smaller space this would make a lot of difference. Actually, when possible, as a layman speaking, I think it can be a good idea.
    Last edited by WT44; 08-09-16 at 12:26 PM.
    08-09-16 12:10 PM
  4. smcv's Avatar
    P.S. When taking a video you can turn on the light by tapping on the light bulb.
    Could this light bulb not be introduced in pano mode?
    I have experimented with this, and it doesn't work well.. since the light constitutes a moving feature, it confuses the tracker into thinking you are not panning at times.
    Right now your best option for indoor panoramas in dark areas is to use the exposure slider to turn up the gain.
    Note that panoramas in tighter spaces (e.g., indoors) don't always turn out well unless you are properly rotating the camera around the axis of the center of the lens/sensor. If you are holding it out in front of you and sweeping it, you are introducing parallax errors.
    FF22 likes this.
    08-09-16 02:38 PM
  5. FF22's Avatar
    I have experimented with this, and it doesn't work well.. since the light constitutes a moving feature, it confuses the tracker into thinking you are not panning at times.
    Right now your best option for indoor panoramas in dark areas is to use the exposure slider to turn up the gain.
    Note that panoramas in tighter spaces (e.g., indoors) don't always turn out well unless you are properly rotating the camera around the axis of the center of the lens/sensor. If you are holding it out in front of you and sweeping it, you are introducing parallax errors.
    Did BB steal you from Kodak or Nikon or Canon?

    Thanks for being here.
    smcv likes this.
    08-09-16 05:23 PM
  6. Hlao-roo's Avatar
    Did BB steal you from Kodak or Nikon or Canon?

    Thanks for being here.
    Apple's next hire.
    FF22 and smcv like this.
    08-09-16 05:46 PM
  7. WT44's Avatar
    I have experimented with this, and it doesn't work well.. since the light constitutes a moving feature, it confuses the tracker into thinking you are not panning at times.
    Right now your best option for indoor panoramas in dark areas is to use the exposure slider to turn up the gain.
    Note that panoramas in tighter spaces (e.g., indoors) don't always turn out well unless you are properly rotating the camera around the axis of the center of the lens/sensor. If you are holding it out in front of you and sweeping it, you are introducing parallax errors.
    How does one do this in practice, i.e. rotate the camera around the axis of the center of the lens/sensor? I mean, the outcome seems good to me as it is, so not sure what you mean with parallax errors. As a laymen, I don't think I get it. Like F2 once said, I love everything you say, even though I often don't understand it due to the high level of technical terminology. but then don't always want to ask further as some kind of "dummy".
    08-10-16 04:55 AM
  8. FF22's Avatar
    How does one do this in practice, i.e. rotate the camera around the axis of the center of the lens/sensor? I mean, the outcome seems good to me as it is, so not sure what you mean with parallax errors. As a laymen, I don't think I get it. Like F2 once said, I love everything you say, even though I often don't understand it due to the high level of technical terminology. but then don't always want to ask further as some kind of "dummy".
    Well, for really well-done Pans, a tripod should be used. That maintains the camera's position as you swing around capturing the image.

    Have fun:

    Parallax Error in Photographs: What is Parallax Error? Tips on How to Avoid Parallax Error in Photographs
    08-10-16 09:00 AM
  9. smcv's Avatar
    How does one do this in practice, i.e. rotate the camera around the axis of the center of the lens/sensor?
    A good way to illustrate this parallax error is with something you already have -- your head. Your head rotates around an axis that doesn't coincide with the lenses in your eyes. If you hold your finger about 6 inches in front of your nose and then start looking left and right, you'll see your finger moving with respect to the background scenery. This is the exact same thing that happens when you hold your phone out in front of you and pan by turning your body. To fix this, you'd need to rotate around a line that runs through the center of the lens in your eye

    In the most simplest sense, imagine your Priv hanging from a string right out the top of the device just above where the c and k meet in BlackBerry. This axis would be pretty close to the center of the lens assembly. If you then rotated the camera while hanging from this string, you'd get a perfect panorama with no parallax error.
    FF22 likes this.
    08-10-16 07:19 PM
  10. delanyinspiron6400's Avatar
    Just to add this, as I've implemented a panorama stichting algorithm before, for feature detection in different images to work, illumination changes should not be too great, as otherwise similarity is not great, most feature detectors can handle viewpoint changes but struggle with illumination changes!
    Also, now you have hard borders that you need to smooth over between images taken with different exposure!

    In general, I absolutely love the Privs panorama implementation, it justs wrecks the native iOS cameras implementation!

    Two panoramas I've taken



    smcv likes this.
    08-11-16 02:33 AM

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