1. meltbox360's Avatar
    My thought is simply this. Security is key for blackberry and the android NDK is a terrible hack which permits android apps to bypass Dalvik. In turn this creates a situation where it is much easier to attack the host OS. RIM already has to secure its own NDK so they simply won't bother with the android NDK due to the ammount of time it would take to implement well.
    11-21-11 12:13 AM
  2. grahamf's Avatar
    Or it could simply be the fact that porting a Java Virtual Machine (AKA Dalvik) to run java apps is a completely different beast than making native apps compatible.

    then again I'm just speculating here. you probably have more evidence/research to back up your claim.
    11-21-11 09:58 AM
  3. meltbox360's Avatar
    I was reading about Dalvik and android and from what I read it appears the NDK bypasses the jvm and has fairly low level control but is still subject to Dalviks scheduler. Its integrated but very terribly. It seems like the android NDK is just a very messy improvised addition. I could be very wrong I haven't actually looked through the source myself. Just throwing this out there for people who might be disappointed because I know I am disappointed at its omission.
    11-21-11 01:45 PM
  4. kbz1960's Avatar
    Dumb question, wouldn't the android native sdk need android?
    11-21-11 01:49 PM
  5. KermEd's Avatar
    They did allow native APK's before - so we know its not something they 'can't' do. But there is a few reasons they don't want to.

    - APK's natively have a smaller icon than BAR's
    - APK's are easy to steal through torrents
    - APK's are harder for RIM to track (due to signing)
    - APK's can be easier to 'hack' together for malicious intentions. To sign one to a BAR, developers need to be at least (on the surface to RIM) relatively low-risk and some personal information ends up in RIM's hands.
    - Speculation: Harder to block some Android functionality in APK's than in BAR's.
    southlander likes this.
    11-21-11 07:13 PM
  6. grahamf's Avatar
    They did allow native APK's before - so we know its not something they 'can't' do. But there is a few reasons they don't want to.

    - APK's natively have a smaller icon than BAR's
    - APK's are easy to steal through torrents
    - APK's are harder for RIM to track (due to signing)
    - APK's can be easier to 'hack' together for malicious intentions. To sign one to a BAR, developers need to be at least (on the surface to RIM) relatively low-risk and some personal information ends up in RIM's hands.
    - Speculation: Harder to block some Android functionality in APK's than in BAR's.
    When did they allow this? last i checked from the earliest official news, NDK was listed as not compatible.
    11-21-11 09:34 PM
  7. FunktasticLucky's Avatar
    on the leaked android player you could install APK's.
    11-22-11 03:55 PM
  8. Magnesus's Avatar
    NDK has nothing to do with supporting native APKs. NDK is a native development kit that allows on Android running compiled code outside of Dalvik. Most games use it. Without it I can't port any of my games unfortunately.
    app_Developer likes this.
    05-30-12 05:24 PM
  9. greatwiseone's Avatar
    Easiest answer to your question: RIM DOES NOT HAVE A LICENSE to the Android NDK and as such has no right to use the Google proprietary software in the NDK on its devices.
    05-30-12 08:38 PM
  10. samab's Avatar
    NDK has nothing to do with supporting native APKs. NDK is a native development kit that allows on Android running compiled code outside of Dalvik. Most games use it. Without it I can't port any of my games unfortunately.
    Most games also are designed from the start to be cross-platform and thus game developers don't even want to Android NDK support for the Playbook.

    If you know what you are doing, you would be porting your iOS version of your game to the Playbook, not your Android version of your game --- because it is massively easier to port the iOS version than the Android version (no jni stuff to worry about).

    Galaxy on Fire 2 was ported from the iOS version, not from the Android version.

    Entering Premium-Space: Galaxy on Fire 2 HD blazes onto the PlayBook Galaxy on Fire 2 HD, Sci-Fi Shooter, Space Trader, 3D Action Game, RIM, Research In Motion, BlackBerry, App World, Playbook, Tablet, Release, Launch, 2012 iPhone, iPad & Smartph

    Pirate Wings for the Playbook is another example of iOS port to the Playbook --- even mistakenly including the iphone reference.

    http://crackberry.com/pirate-wings-n...berry-playbook

    Easiest answer to your question: RIM DOES NOT HAVE A LICENSE to the Android NDK and as such has no right to use the Google proprietary software in the NDK on its devices.
    There is no proprietary license in the Android NDK.

    Google has proprietary license on Android Market, Google Maps, gmail...
    05-30-12 09:01 PM
  11. Cozz4ever's Avatar
    Easiest answer to your question: RIM DOES NOT HAVE A LICENSE to the Android NDK and as such has no right to use the Google proprietary software in the NDK on its devices.
    Cross reference "Android Open Source Project"

    Pay close attention to the license "Apache License 2"
    05-30-12 10:09 PM
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