01-23-12 06:29 PM
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  1. lnichols's Avatar
    I would have put the majority of corporate resources to finish OS2 and BB10 quick, scaled back BB7 to as skeleton crew as possible, and tried to get OS2 and and an HSPA+ and CDMA BB10 device out by the end of November 2011 for the US market, but since that time is passed, get BB10 out by BBW. Don't need LTE right because only Verizon has a decent sized network and it is still not ubiquitous. Push BB7 hard overseas and ride the BB7 horse into the ground there while working to get BB10 adopted heavily in the US to work to be a dominant force here again. Go the Samsung route of mocking Apple iPhone users standing in lines for iPhones (great commercials), except show Apple and Android users tethered to a wall outlets or looking at their data usage in shock, etc. Show what RIM does better than the others, not stupid commercials with glowing bikes. Time to start throwing punches and fighting for the market, not letting carriers dictate the show either.
    01-23-12 12:58 PM
  2. Unsure2's Avatar
    I agree with those who say whatever RIM does with the Playbook later, it should first complete it by bringing out OS2 and the promised apps. Then, at least, the Playbook won't seem like a technological failure for RIM.

    As for whether RiM continues with the Playbook, from everything I've read, I reluctantly conclude it doesn't make business sense. The Playbook would be squeezed pricewise between the $199 Fire and the $249 quad-core tablets that are apparently appearing soon, and we haven't been shown any way that RIM can make money selling the Playbook in that range. Of course, we don't have full information. RIM has been talking about a video store. If RIM goes into the media business, a la Amazon, maybe it could leverage Playbook prices with media profits. (I'm doubtful it's that easy.) As for doing this with BB phones, so far that doesn't seem to be working...
    01-23-12 01:36 PM
  3. bbvj's Avatar
    Find and hire or promote a Geat Marketing VP with a strong engineering background and turn him/her loose.
    .....and start rolling out some strategically placed Blackberry retail outlets as part of the new marketing strategy....a dedicated and knowledgeable sales staff would get the PBs moving...
    01-23-12 01:51 PM
  4. kubernetes's Avatar
    Official Android app support.

    Netflix and Kindle.

    Sorry, but the Playbook as a platform is already dead. When the company is selling them at firesale prices and doesn't have a successor device in the channel, that's a bad sign.

    Right now I have a Playbook, an iPad2, and an Android phone. QNX has by far the best OS--beats the snot out of iOS and Android-- but the app availability is terrible. I don't see much hope that RIM will lure in more development, not for a tablet they're already selling at discount. It says there's no longevity, and people who buy up stuff at firesale prices are likely not the ones who will spend serious cash on app purchases.

    Love the hardware and OS--just wish it had more to offer in terms of apps.
    01-23-12 02:00 PM
  5. eric89074's Avatar
    .....and start rolling out some strategically placed Blackberry retail outlets as part of the new marketing strategy....a dedicated and knowledgeable sales staff would get the PBs moving...
    This is a bad idea. Nothing is going to move PBs except for fire sales. The expectation is $199.00 or less and they can't even sell out of them for $199.00.
    01-23-12 02:00 PM
  6. majorusa's Avatar
    I would release the OS 2.0 as it was promised then keep support for the users for another 1 year and then discontinue the product all together. PB is already technically obsolete because all the other makers are already producing tablets with Tegra 3 or another quad core processor.

    In terms of phones, I would produce a phone with physical keyboard, larger display and a really impressive battery. If they will pull this out then there is future for RIM. Else I really do not see any point in owning a phone that does average what all the others are doing better.
    01-23-12 02:53 PM
  7. Thunderbuck's Avatar
    I believe the Playbook in its current form will be a WAY more attractive device once 2.0 releases next month. It will be attractive enough that they should sell like hotcakes at current prices to clear the current inventory.

    While I don't think there's any problem with current PB hardware, RIM won't be able to increase the price on the current tablet. If they intend to stay in this business, they better be in a position to introduce new hardware. Were I the PB product manager, I'd be insisting on NFC, double the storage on all models, and a 10" option. And maybe a new docking solution to connect to a TV (combined with the new remote feature in Bridge, this would be very cool).

    I'd seriously consider an Android Bridge client, too...
    01-23-12 03:22 PM
  8. ADozenEggs@aol.com's Avatar
    The Playbook has great hardware and a solid OS supporting it.

    1.) The Playbook is just an accessory to the phone. RIM has already started down this road with the remote feature.

    2.) From a RIM to business perspective, they need to encourage development to integrate business needs with the Playbook and help companies untether themselves by using a tablet instead of a desk/laptop.

    3.) It is all about the proper marketing, which is why Apple can sell something without certain features as the better option.
    1.) So you would start with fixing the phones and making the a 'perk' to the phone?

    2.) It was this same focus on enterprise that has now given RIM a 6% share of the U.S. consumer market.


    The new CEO seems to understand that RIM need to focus on consumers and make them the primary focus if they want to make a comeback in a market driven by consumer purchases.
    01-23-12 03:23 PM
  9. Thunderbuck's Avatar
    I would release the OS 2.0 as it was promised then keep support for the users for another 1 year and then discontinue the product all together. PB is already technically obsolete because all the other makers are already producing tablets with Tegra 3 or another quad core processor...
    Soooo, giving the PB a death sentence would do a lot to promote developer support, huh?

    How about this: stay committed to the PB, and encourage all the devs working on BB10 to support PB, too? Current hardware is still good, but introduce an upgraded tab with quad-core later this year? Where's the harm?
    01-23-12 03:25 PM
  10. raysivley's Avatar
    The issue here is how to make RIM products cutting edge, affordable and fun to use.

    1) marketing-----its below substandard

    2) make sure the RIM platform has the highest app PAYOUT in the industry...app makers will follow the dollars.

    3) Have some intern cruise websites like this one and report back what the consumer is thinking in concert with what is possible to build.
    kennyliu likes this.
    01-23-12 03:35 PM
  11. LoganSix's Avatar
    1.) So you would start with fixing the phones and making the a 'perk' to the phone?
    2.) It was this same focus on enterprise that has now given RIM a 6% share of the U.S. consumer market.

    The new CEO seems to understand that RIM need to focus on consumers and make them the primary focus if they want to make a comeback in a market driven by consumer purchases.
    The current phones are out the door, no use at looking at them anymore. The focus is on the new phones and what you can do with them. The 6% market share in the U.S. is because RIM didn't upgrade their phones with the trends. However, there was a time when the BlackBerry held the market. They held the market because it was "cool" to have a BlackBerry. When the BB 10s come out, there will be no difference between them and iOS, Android or Windows. There really is NO difference for the user. So, you have to sell the experience to the user.

    Therefor yes, your phone is an accessory. But RIM should sell the BlackBerry as not just the accessory, but the brains powering all of your computing needs and to run your other accessories (tablet, smart watch, heads up display glasses, body monitor wear, etc...) that bring together your wearable computer that detaches you from the desk.

    For example:
    Do you need a larger screen? Here's our Playbook.
    Do you need to display your video presentation? Here is a pico projector that connects o your Phone. Or you can plug in your Playbook to the TV and control it with your phone.
    Don't want to reach into your pocket to see who's calling? Look at your smart watch connected to your phone. Or, you are wearing glasses with HUD to show you the number and bone conducting ear phones to read a text message.

    The technology is there, RIM just needs to market it.
    01-23-12 03:59 PM
  12. kbz1960's Avatar
    Official Android app support.

    Netflix and Kindle.

    Sorry, but the Playbook as a platform is already dead. When the company is selling them at firesale prices and doesn't have a successor device in the channel, that's a bad sign.

    Right now I have a Playbook, an iPad2, and an Android phone. QNX has by far the best OS--beats the snot out of iOS and Android-- but the app availability is terrible. I don't see much hope that RIM will lure in more development, not for a tablet they're already selling at discount. It says there's no longevity, and people who buy up stuff at firesale prices are likely not the ones who will spend serious cash on app purchases.

    Love the hardware and OS--just wish it had more to offer in terms of apps.
    OK so you are saying the bb10 phones are dead also. So what do you want them to use on the phones?

    I'd hire derusset and let him hire who he wants and do what needs to be done
    01-23-12 04:06 PM
  13. ADozenEggs@aol.com's Avatar

    1.) However, there was a time when the BlackBerry held the market.

    2.) They held the market because it was "cool" to have a BlackBerry. When the BB 10s come out, there will be no difference between them and iOS, Android or Windows.

    3.) There really is NO difference for the user. So, you have to sell the experience to the user.



    Therefor yes, your phone is an accessory. But RIM should sell the BlackBerry as not just the accessory, but the brains powering all of your computing needs and to run your other accessories (tablet, smart watch, heads up display glasses, body monitor wear, etc...) that bring together your wearable computer that detaches you from the desk.


    Do you need a larger screen? Here's our Playbook.
    4.) Do you need to display your video presentation?

    5.) Don't want to reach into your pocket to see who's calling?[/I] Look at your smart watch connected to your phone.

    6.) Or, you are wearing glasses with HUD to show you the number and bone conducting ear phones to read a text message.

    The technology is there, RIM just needs to market it.


    1.) The past is the past.

    2.) BB were 'cool' when 9 - 13 weren't part of the consumer cell phone purchase decision. They are now regardless of whether or not their parents are the ones paying for the phones.

    3.) Of course there's a difference. This same philosophy that caused brought about RIMs fall from grace.

    4.) What percentage of the consumer market makes presentations and needs a pico projector?

    5.) Why not just make a watch that can make calls then?

    6.) So, if I don't wear glasses, I should wear glasses so that I can see who's calling on a display?

    "I want us to have a bit more of an ear toward the consumer market and understand trends." - Thorsten Heins
    01-23-12 04:21 PM
  14. mjdimer's Avatar
    I'd stop getting in the way of those who are the experts in their given fields for one and work on an over-arching vision for the company. Marketing, R&D, etc - all these people know their stuff so give them the freedom to do it and just ensure they deliver on time, on budget and are consistent with the vision.

    I'd make building a passionate developer community a priority. I'd limit the amount of devices being sold, and stop distracting the consumer base with the 'this is what's coming in a year / 2 years' and start focussing on now.

    Oh, and prevent any device from being released unfinished.
    01-23-12 04:26 PM
  15. eric89074's Avatar
    Current hardware is still good, but introduce an upgraded tab with quad-core later this year? Where's the harm?
    Don't you understand they can't do this and make a profit? They've pigeonholed themselves to the $199.00 price tag. Very few people are going to pay more than that for a BB tablet. They can't even liquidate their current stock at $199.00. The PB brand name is damaged goods.
    01-23-12 04:46 PM
  16. Snoman002's Avatar
    1) Make 4 iconic devices, keyboard phone, keyboardless phone, 7" tablet, 12" tablet. Make the devices look great, like each other, and appeal to those looking for upmarket. No point in trying to make 10 different models that look like variations of the same thing. Make owning a Blackberry, owning a BLACKBERRY! Hire a top of the line designer and then sell the heck out of that, dont waste effort making 10 different versions of average.

    2) Common OS across the board, apps for one work on all. Don't force your developers down a stovepipe, let them make one app that reaches all consumers of that market. Owning a Blackberry device, regardless of size, should be the same between each.

    3) Do EVERYTHING you can to make it easy to develop for your platform, get rid of needless management and unnessissary steps to create and start selling apps.

    4) Great interconnection between devices, make it "easier" to do thing between devices because they are all Blackberry. Interconnected files using bridge and cloud, make it so anything created on one is easily accessable between all (even without network) with little to no setup (email, contacts, lisenced apps, pictures, etc too). Who wouldn't want to make a rough ppt on a phone, then touch it up on a playbook while sitting in the back of a taxi, finalize it with graphics and animations back at the hotel room on the 12" tablet, and then display it in a meeting off a projector connected to your phone, all without transfering a single file. Something taken nearly a full 360 degrees simply because you own and use Blackberry.

    5) blanket 20% charge (instead of industry standard 30%) on apps and 6mo with no fees and 100% profit for new developers.

    6) Improve the dang App World!

    7) Stick to release schedules. You don't need to tell us everything comming down the pipe and then don't meet expectations. Tells us what's new, and then give it to use the next day.

    8) OS core standardized, and released on RIM's schedule. Carrier customization allowed to some extent, but any core updates are sent out to ALL and if the carrier didn't get their crap in on time they don't get it in the release. From a consumer standpoint this is one of the greatest thing about iOS and the worst things about android. iOS devices get updates when the are ready, as opposed to Android where the updates come sometimes, probably late, and quite often never.

    9) Security without locking out devs and users. iOS has security, by preventing the user from having full access, Android on the otherhand doesn't lock anything out but is very insecure. Open up the hardware and software and then partner with Lookout, or Kaperski, or ESET to secure the device. Let me do great things, and devs make great things, without just locking it down so it cant do anything so you can call it secure.
    kennyliu likes this.
    01-23-12 04:49 PM
  17. kubernetes's Avatar
    OK so you are saying the bb10 phones are dead also. So what do you want them to use on the phones?
    Sorry, I should be more clear. I don't think QNX is dead, but the Playbook in its current iteration is dead. Yes, they should release 2.0, but trying to revive the Playbook with more marketing is just a waste of money. Once you've put the thing on firesale it's nearly impossible to revive it as a flagship device. If they have a Playbook2 in the works, put the effort into that.

    Honestly, the Bridge was possibly the worst idea ever and really sank this device from day one. I know RIM wanted to create a synergy and market it as 'You get even more if you have/buy a BB phone," but for most consumers it felt like "You get a gimped tablet unless you shell out more dough for a BB phone." The strategy didn't create new customers--it just limited the customer base to people who already owned a BB phone.

    I bought an iPad2 last year, but I wouldn't have done it if it required me to buy an iPhone for full functionality. The only reason I picked up a Playbook was because of the sale... and I love the damn thing, but I wish RIM hadn't killed it with such dumb decisions.
    01-23-12 05:32 PM
  18. djnshores's Avatar
    RIM has to execute, they came out with an outstanding Playbook and they left it half finished.
    RIM has to perfect their execution in all areas relevant to their business, for starters
    The Playbook has excellent hardware. But the tablet is only as good as the operating system and what it can do for the customer. You're not going to build brand loyalty on missed promises.

    So execution IS important. Once the customer is convinced the product has value then RIM needs to stay on the cutting edge. People are willing to cough up $499 for an iPad 2 because customers believe it is worth it.
    01-23-12 05:48 PM
  19. kbz1960's Avatar
    Sorry, I should be more clear. I don't think QNX is dead, but the Playbook in its current iteration is dead. Yes, they should release 2.0, but trying to revive the Playbook with more marketing is just a waste of money. Once you've put the thing on firesale it's nearly impossible to revive it as a flagship device. If they have a Playbook2 in the works, put the effort into that.

    Honestly, the Bridge was possibly the worst idea ever and really sank this device from day one. I know RIM wanted to create a synergy and market it as 'You get even more if you have/buy a BB phone," but for most consumers it felt like "You get a gimped tablet unless you shell out more dough for a BB phone." The strategy didn't create new customers--it just limited the customer base to people who already owned a BB phone.

    I bought an iPad2 last year, but I wouldn't have done it if it required me to buy an iPhone for full functionality. The only reason I picked up a Playbook was because of the sale... and I love the damn thing, but I wish RIM hadn't killed it with such dumb decisions.
    Agree as long as they continue to send us updates for the old playbook

    All though I do love bridge and it would be sweet if they could make it for the other phones too.
    01-23-12 06:05 PM
  20. mjs416's Avatar
    Official Android app support.

    Netflix and Kindle.

    Sorry, but the Playbook as a platform is already dead. When the company is selling them at firesale prices and doesn't have a successor device in the channel, that's a bad sign.

    Right now I have a Playbook, an iPad2, and an Android phone. QNX has by far the best OS--beats the snot out of iOS and Android-- but the app availability is terrible. I don't see much hope that RIM will lure in more development, not for a tablet they're already selling at discount. It says there's no longevity, and people who buy up stuff at firesale prices are likely not the ones who will spend serious cash on app purchases.

    Love the hardware and OS--just wish it had more to offer in terms of apps.
    Here's the old app argument without any mention of the apps it's lacking. While everyone agrees that the missing Skype and Netflix apps sucks - What does your itoy have that the PB does not?
    01-23-12 06:11 PM
  21. kubernetes's Avatar
    Here's the old app argument without any mention of the apps it's lacking. While everyone agrees that the missing Skype and Netflix apps sucks - What does your itoy have that the PB does not?
    Yeah, obviously Netflix, but a ton of games, better music and audio streaming, Yelp, magazines, newspapers, etc.

    I have an Android phone and when I thought about picking up a tablet last year, the factor that really drove me to the iPad was the App Store. It really is leagues ahead of the Android Market when it comes to quality apps and titles, and the Android Market is, in turn, leagues ahead of App World.

    And yes, apps are crucial for tablets because they're really great for viewing content. I think that's why Amazon is the only Android tablet maker that got it right--instead of trying to compete on the hardware level with the iPad, they realized that it's the content ecosystem that is really important for tablet users. I would probably sell my iPad if the Playbook had even a tenth of the apps. It's like having the best, most advanced video game system and almost no games.
    01-23-12 06:29 PM
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