01-22-12 11:13 PM
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  1. hpjrt's Avatar
    I haven't read all the posts in this thread, but I don't care if you're talking iPad or my preferred tablet, my Playbook, reading on an lcd screen isn't optimal. That's why I do my reading on my Sony PRS650 with its much more eye friendly e-ink screen.

    I read a lot, (about 2 to 4 books a week), mostly for pleasure, and I wouldn't be able to do that on an lcd screen. Some people aren't bothered by text on an lcd screen, but those lucky souls are, apparently, the minority.

    I do use my Playbook to view cookbooks and story books for my 2 year old granddaughter, but unless a text book was graphic/picture heavy, I'm not sure the eye strain would be worth the education.

    Just the perspective of someone who had worn glasses for 54 years ... you don't want to add unnecessary strain on your eyesight.
    01-20-12 07:12 PM
  2. mjs416's Avatar
    That's like comparing apples and black berries LOL
    But thats the name... OHHHH I see what you did there.
    01-20-12 07:14 PM
  3. dandbj13's Avatar
    Yes it would. Want to know why? $$$$ At least Until Apple stops charging $500 for the base model super sized itouch.
    You know, a lot of people on this board paid $500 for their base model PB and might beg to differ with you. The only difference between Apple charging $500 and RIM charging $500 is success. People thought, and still think $500 is a fair price for an iPad. They are still trying to determine a fair price for the PB.

    Here's a thought. Just admit Apple did something else really nice that you wish you had. Or better yet, don't. Just leave the subject alone. This is, after all, a PB forum, not an Apple bashing forum. Or are those the same thing?
    01-20-12 07:16 PM
  4. Darlaten's Avatar
    Just admit Apple did something else really nice that you wish you had. Or better yet, don't. Just leave the subject alone. This is, after all, a PB forum, not an Apple bashing forum. Or are those the same thing?
    For me, this has nothing to do with bashing Apple; rather it is a philosophical argument of ownership of intellectual property and creativity. Should authors, who create the content of textbooks or novels have to surrender their control of their content to a company, in this case Apple, if wanting to have the content accessible from an Ipad. For me, the answer is a strong and definitive no.

    But if you look at the clauses within the agreement for iBooks, you will see that Apple, in fact, gains ownership of the content. And this has not gone over well with some authors and critics: If you publish with iBooks Author, does Apple 'own' you? - latimes.com
    01-20-12 08:05 PM
  5. dandbj13's Avatar
    For me, this has nothing to do with bashing Apple; rather it is a philosophical argument of ownership of intellectual property and creativity. Should authors, who create the content of textbooks or novels have to surrender their control of their content to a company, in this case Apple, if wanting to have the content accessible from an Ipad. For me, the answer is a strong and definitive no.

    But if you look at the clauses within the agreement for iBooks, you will see that Apple, in fact, gains ownership of the content. And this has not gone over well with some authors and critics: If you publish with iBooks Author, does Apple 'own' you? - latimes.com
    So many straw men; so little time. Why would anyone want to author a book with Apple's proprietary tool for creating proprietary content for their proprietary store if they wanted to sell it somewhere else? You don't use Xcode to build an Android or BB app. Why would the expectation be different, here?

    The name of the app in question is iBooks Author, not ebooks author. This is not a generic answer to a generic question: "How do I author and publish cool ebooks?" This is a specific answer to a specific question: "How do I build those neat iBooks for the iBooks store?" Get the difference? iBooks Author is a free answer to that specific question. If you want a more generic answer, you are more than free to fork over how ever many hundreds of dollars Adobe extorts.

    You can also just author your ebook in Pages and export to epub or PDF and do what you like with it. The restriction is only about the authoring tool made freely available for the creation of iBooks to go in the iBooks store. You are free to use any crappy old authoring mechanism to write once and publish anywhere, including the iBooks store if that's your fancy.

    Next...

    Addendum:

    In a rush to find scandal where there is none, many are overlooking another huge detail. In the specific case in question, Apple is no longer acting as merely a bookseller. With this tool, they are also asserting their right as a book publisher. How many books do you know of that are simultaneously published with Random House and S&S? None! Publishing contracts are exclusive. iBooks is not just a bookstore; it is a publishing house. They can reject your submission just like any publisher. We are just not used to thinking of them this way.

    iBooks Author is the equivalent of Random House giving their authors a Random House authoring tool and restricting them from selling the output to S&S. Anyone who wants to deal with Apple as simply a bookstore can do so. They do not have to deal with publishing agreements. They can use any epub tool they wish to sell their work in the iBooks Store. There is no controversy except among the uninformed.
    Last edited by dandbj13; 01-20-12 at 08:41 PM. Reason: Addendum
    01-20-12 08:20 PM
  6. cl8baller's Avatar
    Although this is more target towards study aids and high school, as a college student I would never purchase an eBook unless the eBook was less than 75%-80% the cost of a used book.

    eBooks may sound practical due to weight, but in terms of practicality, using a physical textbook feels a lot more productivity in most cases with the exception of math and some sciences.
    01-20-12 09:50 PM
  7. Peritaxis's Avatar
    So, it is OK for you to use an electronic textbook because your eyes are much more resilient to strain? Or perhaps you just have better reasons to view books that way than others? And did you really lump reading a textbook on an iPad with watching TV? Of the screens you mentioned, don't you think kids might ought to watch a little less TV? Wouldn't that make sense?

    Some of you guys are trying way to hard to find negative talking points. Tell me, would any of this be better if it was promoted on the PB rather than the iPad? I remember when Apple introduced the iPad and detractors said that tablets were stupid. Come to think of it, they said the same thing about iPod, iPhone, and Macbook Air. It is always stupid until your company of choice KIRFs one up for you with a more pleasing logo. Will bBooks textbooks be better, or will these silly arguments persist? I think everyone holding a PB knows the answer to that.
    Hold it buddy, why are you so defensive? I'm just concerned about excessive screentime and the negative effects on eyes.

    I have an e-reader app on my PB but I wouldn't recommend RIM to get into this business because the PB is ultimately still a screen. I read an hour on my PB and my eyes feel strained, I read 4 hours in a paperback book, my eyes are not as strained, still tired.

    I'm not saying they are not good educational tools. They are great for big colourful pictures. But textbooks are full of TEXT, which are better read off a non-screen surface when needed to be done for a long period of time.

    And to think kids will watch less tv/play video games just because a textbook is on a tablet is wishful thinking. Textbook is a textbook in whatever medium you put it. I dread reading my 'recommended readings' in any textbook whether it's a book or on my laptop. It's just that the tablet can double up as another toy, video game.

    Also, we're talking about school-age kids, with developing eyes. Those not yet reached maturity have changing prescriptions, which may or may not be affected by excessive screentime.

    This quote sums up my sentiment if you want to hear it from another person.

    I haven't read all the posts in this thread, but I don't care if you're talking iPad or my preferred tablet, my Playbook, reading on an lcd screen isn't optimal. That's why I do my reading on my Sony PRS650 with its much more eye friendly e-ink screen.

    I read a lot, (about 2 to 4 books a week), mostly for pleasure, and I wouldn't be able to do that on an lcd screen. Some people aren't bothered by text on an lcd screen, but those lucky souls are, apparently, the minority.
    Cool off, dude. Health concern, NOT business. Nothing personal.
    01-21-12 12:38 AM
  8. dandbj13's Avatar
    I'm just concerned about excessive screentime and the negative effects on eyes... Health concern, NOT business.
    It's funny, the only time I have ever heard anyone decry the LCD as a health hazard is in relation to an Apple product. I have never heard the argument used to warn against the ill effects of the PB, TP, Xoom, Gtab, or non-Apple phones.

    The big argument used in favor of the Kindle was the e-ink screens were better for reading as they were easier on the eyes. This, of course, was in comparison to the iPad with its bright, LCD screen. All that just magically went away when Amazon wanted to compete in the tablet space. They went with an LCD. Do you know the number one thing people do with a KF? Read books. Suddenly, it's OK to read long-form books on an LCD, just not an iPad. Those will destroy the developing eyes of children.

    In these forums, I have heard people talk about the desire for a Kindle app for the PB, but never once saw this health concern. I don't read every post. Maybe I missed it. This thread starts with someone, presumably a PB fan, opining that RIM should do something like iBooks textbooks. The usual chorus of voices chimed in to explain why, as an Apple initiative, it must be a bad idea. It was only a matter of time before someone brought up the health of the children.

    I'm sure your concerns are just as you say, health, not business. No worries. I'm sure you are doing a fine job regulating your children's eye health by keeping them away from such dangerous uses of electronics. Kids have been rotting away in front of screens of various types for quite a long time now. I have yet to see the study showing that they suffer more migraines and worse eyesight as a result. I look forward to reading whatever links you wish to provide. In the spirit of fairness, I will provide one for you.

    Students' math scores jumped 20% with iPad textbooks, publisher says

    There has been nary a mention of reduced vision, just increased math scores. You can rest easy. There is no evidence that textbooks on iPads are making kids blind, just smarter. I will keep a close eye on it.

    Addendum

    There are two more bits of info you might be happy to know about since your concern is the eye health of developing children. These books on the iPad will actually serve to reduce the problems you fear in two key ways. First, in portrait mode, the text is scalable. You can make the font as large as you need in order to reduce eyestrain. Being a heavy reader, my greatest strain comes from squinting at small print in bad light. Now, every textbook is a large print book with this program.

    Second, if that is still not enough to fight off strain, you can have the iPad read the text to you. Yes, you can rest your eyes and still get your reading done. You see, the iPad is completely accessible for the blind and visually impaired. It has a built-in screen reader. Every function of iDevices are fully accessible to the blind. They are becoming the devices of choice for that community. Now, current textbooks are accessible to everyone. Eyestrain not included.
    Last edited by dandbj13; 01-21-12 at 01:27 AM. Reason: addendum
    addicted44 likes this.
    01-21-12 01:11 AM
  9. Peritaxis's Avatar
    It's funny, the only time I have ever heard anyone decry the LCD as a health hazard is in relation to an Apple product. I have never heard the argument used to warn against the ill effects of the PB, TP, Xoom, Gtab, or non-Apple phones.

    Suddenly, it's OK to read long-form books on an LCD, just not an iPad. Those will destroy the developing eyes of children.

    I'm sure your concerns are just as you say, health, not business. No worries. I'm sure you are doing a fine job regulating your children's eye health by keeping them away from such dangerous uses of electronics. Kids have been rotting away in front of screens of various types for quite a long time now. I have yet to see the study showing that they suffer more migraines and worse eyesight as a result. I look forward to reading whatever links you wish to provide. In the spirit of fairness, I will provide one for you.

    Students' math scores jumped 20% with iPad textbooks, publisher says

    There has been nary a mention of reduced vision, just increased math scores. You can rest easy. There is no evidence that textbooks on iPads are making kids blind, just smarter. I will keep a close eye on it.
    Is Apple paying you to defend it vehemently? Did you not notice that I referred to Tablets in GENERAL, not the iPad specifically in my last post?

    First off, your article was biased because it was linked from an Apple website. And the research was obviously funded by Apple. Thus, in a scientific community, the research is not exactly sound. Sorry. As far as I'm concerned, quality of the teachers in the control group might have been poor anyway.

    Secondly, you might have been looking in the wrong place. Have you tried PubMed? Don't worry, I did a quick search for you.

    This one finds that eyestrain can be measured objectively, not just self-report. And they used LCD screens to do it. [Objective evaluation o... [Nihon Hoshasen Gijutsu Gakkai Zasshi. 2010] - PubMed - NCBI

    This one, measured eyestrains on people who worked in front of LCD and CRT monitors all day. Luminance of the surround and visual f... [Int J Occup Saf Ergon. 1999] - PubMed - NCBI

    This one talks about eye strain in general in a screen-dominated society.
    Computer Vision Syndrome: A Review 10.1016/j.survophthal.2005.02.008 : Survey of Ophthalmology | ScienceDirect.com

    Just because you couldn't find research doesn't mean it wasn't there.

    And I don't have children, nor did I say electronics are dangerous. I didn't say they were making kids blind. I did already say they've been rotting in front of screens for a long time now. But do they need any MORE screen time? If they're watching 2 hours of TV after school and spending another 4 in front of a computer screen playing/working, do I want them to spend another 6 hours at school looking at a screen?

    I express no interest in a Kindle app, but I can understand why some people may want it. I am indifferent to whether or not the PB will acquire one. If RIM wants to get into this business of eTextbooks, then so what? You're still missing the big picture. Screen time and eye strain. Not that RIM gives less eyestrain than Apple.

    Doesn't matter if it can make a text bigger, still a screen. Fantastic, it can read to the children. In that case, I'll revert back to a CD player that can do the same thing for 1/20 of the price of an iPad. If I want to be more up-to-date, maybe an MP3 player hooked up to some speakers. I said school-age children, not the blind people.

    I'm done. I contributed a post regarding a health concern that hasn't been mentioned earlier in the thread and you start a full outright argument with me to defend Apple's iPad. Only to completely miss the point.
    01-21-12 02:31 AM
  10. OniBerry's Avatar
    Funny posts, good reading. Made me laugh.

    Read the EULA, then tell me it's a good idea.
    01-21-12 02:46 AM
  11. Toodeurep's Avatar
    You know, a lot of people on this board paid $500 for their base model PB and might beg to differ with you. The only difference between Apple charging $500 and RIM charging $500 is success. People thought, and still think $500 is a fair price for an iPad. They are still trying to determine a fair price for the PB.

    Here's a thought. Just admit Apple did something else really nice that you wish you had. Or better yet, don't. Just leave the subject alone. This is, after all, a PB forum, not an Apple bashing forum. Or are those the same thing?
    Do you own and actively use a playbook? I come here to build an environment of learning and helping and prefer to hear from only those doing the same thing. The lack of a device list on your part and some of your recent posts indicate you are no longer an active playbook user and therefore should also stop posting in the playbook forum. I like my Apple and Android products as well and refuse to allow RIM bashing in those forums as well. I guess it is time to use the little red triangle.
    01-21-12 06:16 AM
  12. hpjrt's Avatar
    It's funny, the only time I have ever heard anyone decry the LCD as a health hazard is in relation to an Apple product. I have never heard the argument used to warn against the ill effects of the PB, TP, Xoom, Gtab, or non-Apple phones.
    You really couldn't be more wrong. E-ink screens were developed to counter the problems encountered when people people stared at LCD screens in general. E-ink screens give the reader the closet thing to black type on a white page ... the sort the would encounter in a physical book.

    The developers of the E-ink screen did not try to sell the technology by blasting iPad screens!

    Get a grip! There are all kinds of studies linking eye strain to LCD screen use ... any LCD screen use.
    menaknow likes this.
    01-21-12 06:30 AM
  13. dandbj13's Avatar
    Do you own and actively use a playbook? I come here to build an environment of learning and helping and prefer to hear from only those doing the same thing. The lack of a device list on your part and some of your recent posts indicate you are no longer an active playbook user and therefore should also stop posting in the playbook forum. I like my Apple and Android products as well and refuse to allow RIM bashing in those forums as well. I guess it is time to use the little red triangle.
    Hey, I'm genuinely sorry you feel I'm bashing the PB. I'm not. I've hardly mentioned it. This thread is not even about the PB and I'm not sure why it is in this forum. I am making counterpoints to what I see as misinformation about an Apple initiative that has nothing to do with the PB, but has caught the attention of this community. No PB bashing intended.
    01-21-12 07:53 AM
  14. dandbj13's Avatar
    I'm done. I contributed a post regarding a health concern that hasn't been mentioned earlier in the thread and you start a full outright argument with me to defend Apple's iPad. Only to completely miss the point.
    Sorry. I most certainly missed your point. Thanks for the reading. Let me quote a bit from one of them:

    However, the major contributor to computer vision syndrome symptoms by far appears to be dry eye. The visual effects of various display characteristics such as lighting, glare, display quality, refresh rates, and radiation are also discussed. Treatment requires a multidirectional approach combining ocular therapy with adjustment of the workstation. Proper lighting, anti-glare filters, ergonomic positioning of computer monitor and regular work breaks may help improve visual comfort. Lubricating eye drops and special computer glasses help relieve ocular surface–related symptoms.
    Nothing in it suggest there is a long-term problem with reading something like, say, a textbook from a tablet device. The tablet can be fitted with a glare reducing shield, ergonomically positioned, an regular breaks can be taken. These studies say nothing of the greater causes of eye strain such as squinting at print that is uncomfortably sized in poor lighting conditions.

    I pointed out that the iPad mitigates against that strain in a couple of additional ways. If the PB did get the scanned PDFs that some were calling for upthread, it would be more of a health issue as it has none of these mitigating factors at half the size. It would actually cause more eye strain. If that's what you meant, I completely agree.

    I also think I might have misunderstood this:

    Doesn't matter if it can make a text bigger, still a screen. Fantastic, it can read to the children. In that case, I'll revert back to a CD player that can do the same thing for 1/20 of the price of an iPad. If I want to be more up-to-date, maybe an MP3 player hooked up to some speakers. I said school-age children, not the blind people.
    None of that made sense to me. You dismiss more comfortable fonts and spoken text offered in the product as meaningless. You compare it to a $25 CD player and differentiate school-age children from blind people as if students can't also be blind. If feels like you are just arguing against the Apple initiative and not for eye health when I read a paragraph like that. My bad.

    I would say that we should just get back on topic, but I didn't find the original topic all that flattering to RIM. The topic seems to be debating the merits of iBooks textbooks. We can dismiss it with no counterpoint, or discuss all sides of it like adults without taking and giving offense. I apologize for giving offense.
    01-21-12 08:38 AM
  15. Mr.Willie's Avatar
    Do you own and actively use a playbook? I come here to build an environment of learning and helping and prefer to hear from only those doing the same thing. The lack of a device list on your part and some of your recent posts indicate you are no longer an active playbook user and therefore should also stop posting in the playbook forum. I like my Apple and Android products as well and refuse to allow RIM bashing in those forums as well. I guess it is time to use the little red triangle.
    I fail to see where the person you quoted was bashing RIM. All that was stated was facts. Apple sold an estimated 18 million iPads this past quarter at full asking price. ($499-$839). RIM sold how many Playbooks, at any price ? Having recently purchased my first smartphone (9810) and liking it, I was considering a second generation Playbook when they came out as an upgrade to my first generation iPad. After updating iBooks and downloading one of these fancy new interactive ebooks, I realize that RIM's Co- CEOs lack any real vision. At a dollar a year salary, they are still overpaid. Time for some fresh blood. Go ahead and harass the mods if you wish, include my post too please.

    Although this is more target towards study aids and high school, as a college student I would never purchase an eBook unless the eBook was less than 75%-80% the cost of a used book.

    eBooks may sound practical due to weight, but in terms of practicality, using a physical textbook feels a lot more productivity in most cases with the exception of math and some sciences.
    The textbooks sell for $14.99 instead of $75. I admit that is for high school students that don't have to generally buy their books, but I don't see why college books couldn't be half the cost that they are now

    Funny posts, good reading. Made me laugh.

    Read the EULA, then tell me it's a good idea.
    That you can sell your works as you wish, but the highly interactive version that is created using free software provide by Apple, may only be sold at the iBooks store ? Sounds fair to me. I write a chemistry book, I can sell it anywhere, but when I doctor it up, I can only sell the doctored up version through the provider of the doctoring up software.

    Eye Strain

    Turn down your brightness and turn a light on in your room.
    Last edited by Mr.Willie; 01-21-12 at 08:55 AM.
    01-21-12 08:50 AM
  16. anthogag's Avatar
    Hey, I'm genuinely sorry you feel I'm bashing the PB. I'm not. I've hardly mentioned it. This thread is not even about the PB and I'm not sure why it is in this forum. I am making counterpoints to what I see as misinformation about an Apple initiative that has nothing to do with the PB, but has caught the attention of this community. No PB bashing intended.


    It looks like you worked overtime on this thread. I hope they're paying you double-time
    01-21-12 10:00 AM
  17. dandbj13's Avatar
    It looks like you worked overtime on this thread. I hope they're paying you double-time
    If by "they" you mean crackberry.com, then yes; they most certainly should be. After all, posting in threads that grow long and attract a lot of attention is profitable for crackberry.com. I'm sure their ad revenue is quite healthy due to an engaged user base.

    Despite that fact, they have not paid me a dime. I guess it is because my post count isn't half what yours is. Tell me, how many posts does it take to get into the money?
    Rickroller and addicted44 like this.
    01-21-12 10:17 AM
  18. Toodeurep's Avatar
    I fail to see where the person you quoted was bashing RIM. All that was stated was facts. Apple sold an estimated 18 million iPads this past quarter at full asking price. ($499-$839). RIM sold how many Playbooks, at any price ? Having recently purchased my first smartphone (9810) and liking it, I was considering a second generation Playbook when they came out as an upgrade to my first generation iPad. After updating iBooks and downloading one of these fancy new interactive ebooks, I realize that RIM's Co- CEOs lack any real vision. At a dollar a year salary, they are still overpaid. Time for some fresh blood. Go ahead and harass the mods if you wish, include my post too please.



    The textbooks sell for $14.99 instead of $75. I admit that is for high school students that don't have to generally buy their books, but I don't see why college books couldn't be half the cost that they are now



    That you can sell your works as you wish, but the highly interactive version that is created using free software provide by Apple, may only be sold at the iBooks store ? Sounds fair to me. I write a chemistry book, I can sell it anywhere, but when I doctor it up, I can only sell the doctored up version through the provider of the doctoring up software.

    Eye Strain

    Turn down your brightness and turn a light on in your room.
    I agree "bashing" wasn't the best choice of words for this particular post, I just didn't want to include some of the longer posts made by the poster. The fact is, if you look at the posters history, it is quite clear what they are doing.

    I guess my overall opinion is that if I don't use a device nor support the manufacturers point of view why visit the forum designed to aid and inform others. The posters history speaks for itself. Me, I have integrity enough not to visit Pantech site just to constantly tell those there that I do not like where they are going.

    My analogy would be visiting a pep rally for the other team just to point out that they probably won't actually win the game or out rebound the other player.
    01-21-12 10:20 AM
  19. dandbj13's Avatar
    I agree "bashing" wasn't the best choice of words for this particular post, I just didn't want to include some of the longer posts made by the poster. The fact is, if you look at the posters history, it is quite clear what they are doing.

    I guess my overall opinion is that if I don't use a device nor support the manufacturers point of view why visit the forum designed to aid and inform others. The posters history speaks for itself. Me, I have integrity enough not to visit Pantech site just to constantly tell those there that I do not like where they are going.

    My analogy would be visiting a pep rally for the other team just to point out that they probably won't actually win the game or out rebound the other player.
    Why are you using things I have said at other times on other topics to evaluate the merits of my reasoning on this topic at this time? How does that work? Do you take some out of context quotes and use them to judge my future motives? I have never understood this. If I have a history of hating on RIM, why would it matter if my reasoning on the current topic is sound? If I have a history of loving on RIM, why would matter if my reasoning on the current topic is poor?

    As for device history, I visit many tech communities. I don't fill in device history for any of them. Personally, I think it is silly. You don't need to know about the stack of devices on my desk to evaluate the soundness of what I have to say. Having a BB in my hand does not make what I say in a given post more logical or productive. Just read the threads and you will see what I mean.

    I think it is dangerous to foster an exclusive club mentality around products and companies. Owning a PB should not make me an accepted member of some kind of club, nor should owning an Apple device exclude me from membership. Crackberry.com is not just about the gathering of fans who circle the wagons and cheerlead each other through tough times. It is about everything RIM. That is fair game for any tech enthusiast who wants to know more about, or just discuss the various machinations of an interesting company.

    It sounds like you would prefer it if crackberry imposed a membership clause excluding posting privileges from anyone who has not built up a certain amount of BB cred through device ownership and loyalty. Thankfully, that is not the case. This would be a far less rich environment if it was. I remind you that this thread doesn't even have anything to do with a BB device. Let us not judge one another by the devices that we own, but by the content of our posts.
    01-21-12 10:52 AM
  20. jonty12's Avatar
    What drives me crazy about this, like most other Apple "innovations", is that the tech press, and many members here are responding as if Apple has invented something here. They haven't. This has been around a long, long time. The format, content, publishing, etc, ALL has been around, and successfully developed and sold for a long, long time. See Ingram Books for an example of a company that has been doing this sucessfully for a long time.

    One more in a line of Apple "innovations" that they had nothing to do with innovating, but Joe Public thinks they came up with it. And, they're already taking credit for it.

    They have the best, bar none, the best strategic marketing department of any company in the World today. That's the area where they innovate (and industrial design). It's not the technology.
    01-21-12 10:52 AM
  21. dandbj13's Avatar
    One more in a line of Apple "innovations" that they had nothing to do with innovating, but Joe Public thinks they came up with it. And, they're already taking credit for it.
    That's outrageous! I'm just as indignant as you if what you say is true. Apple didn't invent textbooks, ebooks, or interactive learning materials. Their own app store is testimony to that. I watched the keynote and must have missed where they are taking credit for any of that or claimed to invent it. If that is what they are doing, that is just silly. I'll watch the keynote again and see if I can find it.
    01-21-12 11:05 AM
  22. Toodeurep's Avatar
    Apple jumps into digital textbooks fray - Yahoo! News

    the market potential is incredible. Pair up the software with a stylus based note taking app to annotate on the book and you're golden.

    But, of course why do that? Better work on that combover, MIke...
    Just in case some of us forgot what this thread was about. To me, it is quite clear this is a RIM thread and I take liberty to suggest that it is in regards to the playbook. It suggests that RIM get this functionality/content arrangement into their product (again I my opinion the Playbook). I trust that if the mods think it is in the wrong place, they will move it.
    01-21-12 11:06 AM
  23. dandbj13's Avatar
    I agree with the consensus from the first page that RIM does not currently have a product suited to this purpose. I think that it would cost them time, money, and attention they simply do not have to spare chasing Apple's tail. I felt that way about the original PB. If you think I was wrong about that, you will probably think I am wrong about this too. I hope that was on topic enough.
    Superfly_FR likes this.
    01-21-12 11:16 AM
  24. jonty12's Avatar
    That's outrageous! I'm just as indignant as you if what you say is true. Apple didn't invent textbooks, ebooks, or interactive learning materials. Their own app store is testimony to that. I watched the keynote and must have missed where they are taking credit for any of that or claimed to invent it. If that is what they are doing, that is just silly. I'll watch the keynote again and see if I can find it.
    Really? This is the headline from Apple's press release on the subject: "Apple Reinvents Textbooks with iBooks 2 for iPad" and to quote from the press release:

    Apple® today announced iBooks® 2 for iPad®, featuring iBooks textbooks, an entirely new kind of textbook that’s dynamic, engaging and truly interactive.(emphasis added)

    So yeah, they are taking credit for inventing this type of interactive textbook. I'm not saying it, they are. Just like they took credit for having the "world's thinnest notebook" when Sony had a thinnner one out for almost a year, and many more examples that the public (and media) laps up and never checks sources on, buliding this "innovative" mystique that in reality doesn't exist. I struggle to think of a single, yes one, technological innovation that Apple actually came up with.
    01-21-12 11:58 AM
  25. dandbj13's Avatar
    So yeah, they are taking credit for inventing this type of interactive textbook.
    I think that is marketing gone amuck. Apple did not invent interactive books. Even narrowing the claim down to textbooks is a stretch, to say the least. They certainly have introduced a product that adds to the genre. I suspect their product will have a much more noticeable impact on the industry than those that have gone before, just as with mp3 players, phones, and tablets. In that sense, they are reinventing the textbook. It is not just a matter of design, but business model and accessible authoring tools. Still, I agree that the marketing line is inaccurate.
    01-21-12 12:19 PM
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