10-30-13 06:25 AM
89 1234
tools
  1. sad_old_man's Avatar
    They aren't accessing at the same time. I uploaded the 32 one day, and the 64 yesterday, when I was setting up the communication thingy you showed me.
    Non parametric end users, I don't know.......
    10-28-13 08:12 AM
  2. castoridae's Avatar
    Non parametric end users, I don't know.......
    You're the MOST non parametric end user on this site - it's called hijacking, especially when other non parametric users are trying to sort out a problem!
    sad_old_man and SEAWARRIOR like this.
    10-28-13 09:56 AM
  3. ChrisMay's Avatar
    The music was copied the same way. When I call up music and choose any song and press play, a box pops up that says:

    Error. There was an error communicating with the media player, please try again. And you have to press ok to get rid of the box.
    I'll delete the music and retry?
    I got this message once. The solution was to restart the PlayBook. Didn't need to re-copy any music files

    For the record, it happened (to me) when I was tryng to play a video, and listen to some music via two different apps at the same time (don't ask).
    I'm guessing that there is some media player 'service' that is supposed to be running in the background, but under certain circumstances, is crashes (or something) and then the Music/Video players can't use it properly.
    castoridae likes this.
    10-28-13 10:17 AM
  4. castoridae's Avatar
    I got this message once. The solution was to restart the PlayBook. Didn't need to re-copy any music files

    For the record, it happened (to me) when I was tryng to play a video, and listen to some music via two different apps at the same time (don't ask).
    I'm guessing that there is some media player 'service' that is supposed to be running in the background, but under certain circumstances, is crashes (or something) and then the Music/Video players can't use it properly.
    Perfect! I'll try this when I get home; so just restart or a soft reboot?
    10-28-13 10:35 AM
  5. ChrisMay's Avatar
    Perfect! I'll try this when I get home; so just restart or a soft reboot?
    Just a restart did it for me. (tap on the battery icon, and select 'restart')
    castoridae likes this.
    10-28-13 11:16 AM
  6. sad_old_man's Avatar
    Perfect! I'll try this when I get home; so just restart or a soft reboot?
    It worked for me as well?
    10-28-13 11:17 AM
  7. bambinoitaliano's Avatar
    It worked for me as well?
    No! For you just press the Eject button!!!
    sad_old_man likes this.
    10-28-13 12:57 PM
  8. sad_old_man's Avatar
    No! For you just press the Eject button!!!
    PULL PULL you pull the eject handle..........stupid kat..............
    castoridae likes this.
    10-28-13 01:05 PM
  9. djrupey's Avatar
    I don't wish to confuse the issue, especially where iTunes users are concerned (as I don't use iTunes, never have except briefly many years ago and know nothing about it), but...

    Winamp is a good free media player and I'm surprised no-one has mentioned it. I use it to rip CDs directly to my PlayBook. With PB connected with USB, load Winamp on the PC, set the desired parameters (MP3, WAV, etc) and destination drive for the ripped files (Playbook) insert CD, click Rip and a few minutes later you're done. It could not be easier.
    sad_old_man likes this.
    10-28-13 01:26 PM
  10. castoridae's Avatar
    Just a restart did it for me. (tap on the battery icon, and select 'restart')
    Worked perfectly! Thx so much
    sad_old_man likes this.
    10-28-13 03:15 PM
  11. castoridae's Avatar
    It worked for me as well?
    Only the lurking Lep would make a statement and a question in one sentence.
    sad_old_man likes this.
    10-28-13 03:19 PM
  12. castoridae's Avatar
    I don't wish to confuse the issue, especially where iTunes users are concerned (as I don't use iTunes, never have except briefly many years ago and know nothing about it), but...

    Winamp is a good free media player and I'm surprised no-one has mentioned it. I use it to rip CDs directly to my PlayBook. With PB connected with USB, load Winamp on the PC, set the desired parameters (MP3, WAV, etc) and destination drive for the ripped files (Playbook) insert CD, click Rip and a few minutes later you're done. It could not be easier.
    Sounds like a good possibility, but how do you tell if your ripping a MP3 or a WAV?
    sad_old_man likes this.
    10-28-13 03:21 PM
  13. beman39's Avatar
    use it to rip CDs directly to my PlayBook. With PB connected with USB, load Winamp on the PC, set the desired parameters (MP3, WAV, etc) and destination drive for the ripped files (Playbook) insert CD, click Rip and a few minutes later you're done. It could not be easier.
    you can set WMP the same way! that's what I was saying before! WMP is so simple nowadays
    10-28-13 08:18 PM
  14. Angus_CB's Avatar
    EAC.

    Then you don't have to deal with the hell that is iTunes or Windows Media Player.
    To expand on that, EAC is Exact Audio Copy.
    It's free and you can find it here.
    sad_old_man likes this.
    10-29-13 04:27 AM
  15. ChrisMay's Avatar
    Sounds like a good possibility, but how do you tell if your ripping a MP3 or a WAV?
    Just to be clear, you are ripping TO an MP3 or a WAV. The files on a CD are in a special format that can't easily be played by media players (hence the need for ripping)

    As with all similar programs, there is a bunch of options that you need to set before you start ripping. These include the file-type that you want to produce, as well as the quality (bit-rate) you want to record at. Higher bit-rate generally means better quality, but bigger files. I'm not that fussy about sound quality, so I tend to record stuff at a slightly lower rate, which means my files are smaller and I can fit more music onto my PB...
    sad_old_man and Carl Estes like this.
    10-29-13 05:31 AM
  16. castoridae's Avatar
    Just to be clear, you are ripping TO an MP3 or a WAV. The files on a CD are in a special format that can't easily be played by media players (hence the need for ripping)

    As with all similar programs, there is a bunch of options that you need to set before you start ripping. These include the file-type that you want to produce, as well as the quality (bit-rate) you want to record at. Higher bit-rate generally means better quality, but bigger files. I'm not that fussy about sound quality, so I tend to record stuff at a slightly lower rate, which means my files are smaller and I can fit more music onto my PB...
    Yeah....., like I said, 'Record now' was so easy. How do you know what format you want/need?
    For example, I have an iPod classic and a touch, 2 playbooks, and an MP player (-ok, so the MP player is obvious).
    What is WAV - is that the ipod/tablet format? Are these the only 2 options? - I hope so
    10-29-13 06:31 AM
  17. dgmckenzie's Avatar
    Bit late in the day but...

    Install XBMC and use that to rip the CD.

    Either map the Playbook address or type it in to explorer along the lines of: \\192.168.1.x\media where x would identify the Playbook on the LAN.

    Open the Music folder on the Playbook and drag the files from the PC to Music
    10-29-13 06:34 AM
  18. ChrisMay's Avatar
    Yeah....., like I said, 'Record now' was so easy. How do you know what format you want/need?
    For example, I have an iPod classic and a touch, 2 playbooks, and an MP player (-ok, so the MP player is obvious).
    What is WAV - is that the ipod/tablet format? Are these the only 2 options? - I hope so
    Ok, this can get very complicated, and I don't pretend to understand it in any great detail, but:
    There are two main types of (digital) audio files. Compressed and Uncompressed.
    Uncompressed is a direct digital impression of the original music, and should be a 'perfect' copy. There are several formats, of which the most popular in general use is probably a WAV file. These files are quite big

    Compressed files can be further split into 2 types Lossy and Lossless.
    Lossless files contain all of the information from the original recording, so you could still get back to the original and they are still a 'perfect' copy. However, the price you pay for that is that you can't compress very much, and so the files are still quite big.
    Lossy compression can make the files much smaller, but they do this by removing some of the information (frequencies) from the recording. Depending on the amount of 'loss' you can vary from no noticable change from the original to very poor quality. It becomes a balance between quality and file-size to some extent. Once you have compressed a file in a lossy way, you can never get back to the original quality (some information is lost). MP3 files are an example of a lossy compressed format, but there are many more (eg WMA, AAC)

    Almost all devices and players will play WAV and MP3 files.

    IMO, for normal listening while on a bus or train etc, you can get away with an MP3 with a fair bit of compression. If you are listening at home, or somewhere quiet (especially over speakers rather than headphone) MP3 with less compression may be an option, though it depends on how 'fussy' a listener you are.
    If you are planning on replacing the CD with the recording (ie you are not going to keep the CD), then you may want to consider a lossless format or very low compression MP3, but again, it depends on how 'fussy' a listener you are, and how much you can 'hear' the compression.
    You could try recording the same track a few times at different qualities (bit-rates) and see what differences you can hear.

    Finally, I ought to say for completeness, that a lot of people will argue that MP3 is not the best choice as far as quality vs size goes. This is probably true, but MP3 remains the most widely supported format (I think).

    If you Google for something like 'Music Compression' you will find far more information that you could ever need on the subject...!!
    Last edited by ChrisMay; 10-29-13 at 07:20 AM.
    Carl Estes and castoridae like this.
    10-29-13 06:51 AM
  19. sad_old_man's Avatar
    Sounds like a good possibility, but how do you tell if your ripping a MP3 or a WAV?
    Ones a file .wav and ones .mp3? Honestly sometimes beaver I do wonder about you? Winamp has been around for years and I know at least three pro DJs that use it. Mind you I also know carpenters that worked on the original ARK construction so ignore me........come to think of it everyone else does?
    10-29-13 08:33 AM
  20. ChrisMay's Avatar
    Ones a file .wav and ones .mp3? Honestly sometimes beaver I do wonder about you? Winamp has been around for years and I know at least three pro DJs that use it. Mind you I also know carpenters that worked on the original ARK construction so ignore me........come to think of it everyone else does?
    I remember having a copy of WinAmp Version 1 (on Windows 3.1 - or maybe it was NT...!)
    sad_old_man likes this.
    10-29-13 08:37 AM
  21. sad_old_man's Avatar
    I remember having a copy of WinAmp Version 1 (on Windows 3.1 - or maybe it was NT...!)
    I remember the very very first windows release (free). Mine was running on an Intel 286 processor. What was yours running on?
    10-29-13 08:44 AM
  22. ChrisMay's Avatar
    I remember the very very first windows release (free). Mine was running on an Intel 286 processor. What was yours running on?
    To be honest, I can't remember. It was a computer at work, so would probably have been fairly leading-edge (for the time), so I guess it would have been a 286 - or maybe even a 386!!
    10-29-13 09:16 AM
  23. castoridae's Avatar
    Bit late in the day but...

    Install XBMC and use that to rip the CD.

    Either map the Playbook address or type it in to explorer along the lines of: \\192.168.1.x\media where x would identify the Playbook on the LAN.

    Open the Music folder on the Playbook and drag the files from the PC to Music
    eh?
    10-29-13 11:11 AM
  24. castoridae's Avatar
    Ok, this can get very complicated, and I don't pretend to understand it in any great detail, but:
    There are two main types of (digital) audio files. Compressed and Uncompressed.
    Uncompressed is a direct digital impression of the original music, and should be a 'perfect' copy. There are several formats, of which the most popular in general use is probably a WAV file. These files are quite big

    Compressed files can be further split into 2 types Lossy and Lossless.
    Lossless files contain all of the information from the original recording, so you could still get back to the original and they are still a 'perfect' copy. However, the price you pay for that is that you can't compress very much, and so the files are still quite big.
    Lossy compression can make the files much smaller, but they do this by removing some of the information (frequencies) from the recording. Depending on the amount of 'loss' you can vary from no noticable change from the original to very poor quality. It becomes a balance between quality and file-size to some extent. Once you have compressed a file in a lossy way, you can never get back to the original quality (some information is lost). MP3 files are an example of a lossy compressed format, but there are many more (eg WMA, AAC)

    Almost all devices and players will play WAV and MP3 files.

    IMO, for normal listening while on a bus or train etc, you can get away with an MP3 with a fair bit of compression. If you are listening at home, or somewhere quiet (especially over speakers rather than headphone) MP3 with less compression may be an option, though it depends on how 'fussy' a listener you are.
    If you are planning on replacing the CD with the recording (ie you are not going to keep the CD), then you may want to consider a lossless format or very low compression MP3, but again, it depends on how 'fussy' a listener you are, and how much you can 'hear' the compression.
    You could try recording the same track a few times at different qualities (bit-rates) and see what differences you can hear.

    Finally, I ought to say for completeness, that a lot of people will argue that MP3 is not the best choice as far as quality vs size goes. This is probably true, but MP3 remains the most widely supported format (I think).

    If you Google for something like 'Music Compression' you will find far more information that you could ever need on the subject...!!
    Ok, this is beginning to make sense. Using all of these terms (WMA, AAC,WAV and MP3) is very confusing for those of us who have not had to delve into this topic.
    To clarify, I use my MP3 to record music sessions so that I can review them for practice later at home. I also plan to copy these onto my playbooks & iPod so I can listen to them whenever and where ever I want.
    Ditto for CDs and other music formats.
    I think what I want to do is fairly basic, copy audio stuff to my playbook &/or iPod.
    10-29-13 11:20 AM
  25. sad_old_man's Avatar
    I remember having a copy of WinAmp Version 1 (on Windows 3.1 - or maybe it was NT...!)
    Given those lovely blue eyes you just had to be a posh cat! I still have a 386 laptop running windows 3.1 oh those were the days?

    Posted via CB10
    10-29-13 11:44 AM
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