1. sagec's Avatar
    http://www.zdnet.com/blog/microsoft/windows-7-tablets-with-15-percent-market-share-and-other-microsoft-news-of-the-week/11743

    Assuming approximately 1mln PlayBook units sold, vs 400k Windows 7 tablets at 1.5% market share, the PlayBook would have 2.5x the share, or 3.5% market share.

    :-D
    01-27-12 03:31 PM
  2. kennyliu's Avatar
    Windows 7 tablets? I am surprised to see they have any market share.

    Non-tablet (desktop) OS running on x86 (huge tablets with massive batteries, a lot of heat production, and short battery life) and astronomical sticker price (~$1000 a piece).

    Edit: if your calculations are correct, then almost 4 % market share is not bad at all. Kepp it rolling, Playbook.
    Last edited by kennyliu; 01-27-12 at 04:54 PM.
    01-27-12 04:09 PM
  3. howarmat's Avatar


    It looks like they got their data from this chart. Now all of these numbers are Q4 only. RIM didnt ship 1 million tablets in Q4 either. So until RIM releases the next set of numbers we dont know really. RIM is part of the 1.9% of the "other" category it would appear
    01-27-12 05:06 PM
  4. swyost's Avatar
    Yes, RIM's numbers are small enough to be lumped in with "other" which means they sell less tablets than those running a desktop OS targeted only at businesses (Windows 7). People need to keep this in perspective and not invent hypothetical numbers for how many tablets RIM may have sold during the recent near fire sale discounts. As of the end of 2011, RIM sold significantly less Playbooks at any price than manufacturers sold $1000+ tablets running a ported desktop OS. Most business execs would likely look at that and cringe in embarrassment, and selling units at a major per unit loss to get some share would not make them pop the champagne corks. So far, even if you include the quasi-fire sale numbers, the Playbook has been a dismal failure (with even less market share than I expected). Hopefully, things will improve in 2012. Given these numbers, I don't see why people are surprised at the lack of interest on the part of Skype and Netflix.
    02-02-12 10:44 PM
  5. 123berryaddicted's Avatar
    Yes, RIM's numbers are small enough to be lumped in with "other" which means they sell less tablets than those running a desktop OS targeted only at businesses (Windows 7). People need to keep this in perspective and not invent hypothetical numbers for how many tablets RIM may have sold during the recent near fire sale discounts. As of the end of 2011, RIM sold significantly less Playbooks at any price than manufacturers sold $1000+ tablets running a ported desktop OS. Most business execs would likely look at that and cringe in embarrassment, and selling units at a major per unit loss to get some share would not make them pop the champagne corks. So far, even if you include the quasi-fire sale numbers, the Playbook has been a dismal failure (with even less market share than I expected). Hopefully, things will improve in 2012. Given these numbers, I don't see why people are surprised at the lack of interest on the part of Skype and Netflix.
    The playbook certainly hasn't captured much of the market share, you're right. But its RIM's first tablet offering, and they've been steadily improving the OS over the last year. Its a fresh OS and will take some time. My gut tells me that RIM will do just fine in the tablet market (long term), I believe their next tablet offerings will be a huge improvement from the current version - BlackBerry still has a fairly snug grip on the business class - even in America and will continue to hold well in this market. The blackberry OS will continue to be the main product that government and high security firms use (apple and android are hardly evening making an attempt at this market).
    blue-b likes this.
    02-02-12 11:12 PM
  6. tommo1975's Avatar
    Apple's tablet accounts for 87 percent of North American web traffic.


    Zoom

    Apple's iPad remained the dominant tablet during December, but Google's Nexus slate and Amazon's Kindle Fire increased their market share.

    Online advertising firm Chitika examined North American tablet impressions on its advertising network, with the latest report collecting "tens of millions of tablet impressions" gathered from December 8 to December 14.

    Apple's lineup of the iPad generates 87 percent of North American web traffic, while the Kindle Fire slate enjoyed the largest increase. Amazon's tablets accounted for 4.88 impressions per 100 iPad impressions, equivalent to a 4.25 percent share of "all tablet web traffic as a whole."

    Impressions generated by the Kindle Fire increased by 20 percent from the 3.57 percent share it settled for a month earlier. Elsewhere, Samsung's Galaxy tablets and Google's own devices including the Nexus 7 also "experienced a usage share increase, albeit less impressive than the Kindle Fire."

    During the aforementioned period, Samsung's devices saw their impressions increase from 2.36 percent to a 2.65 percent of North American tablet traffic. The Nexus slate increased its share from a 0.91 percent hold in November to 1.06 percent in December, which represents a 15 percent month-to-month growth.

    The full list of tablets ranked by average tablet impressions per 100 iPad impressions is as follows:
    Amazon Kindle Fire: 4.88
    Samsung Galaxy Tablets: 3.04
    Google Nexus Tablets: 1.22
    Asus Transformer: 0.93
    Barnes & Noble Nook: 0.91
    BlackBerry PlayBook: 0.80
    Acer Iconia: 0.76
    Toshiba Thrive: 0.60
    Motorola Xoom: 0.59
    Other Android Tablets: 0.45
    Microsoft Surface: 0.22
    HP TouchPad: 0.18
    Unidentifiable Android Tablets: 0.17

    source : iPad Dominates Tablet Market, Google Nexus Increases Share

    Seems to show a bit more data on the market share of the Playbook
    howarmat likes this.
    12-30-12 09:07 AM
  7. howarmat's Avatar
    Nice find, playbook is about where i pictured it. I did expect it higher than the nook but the others are expected.
    12-30-12 09:34 AM
  8. Toodeurep's Avatar
    Wish these statistics were a bit more defined. They use the words "tablets" in regards to Nexus and Galaxy but name the Amazon Kindle Fire and Asus Transformer. I would think that should actually be "Fires" since there are three now and I am pretty sure there are more than one Asus Transformer.

    Any solid stats on the original Fire? I would find it a bit hard to believe that it alone was garnering such numbers because I find the 2nd and 3rd iterations to be far superior.
    12-30-12 10:16 AM
  9. mike Steele's Avatar
    History Channel 101 All time devices has the BB at # 54 (or something) Apple didnt make the cut but all the examples of cell phone used were Androids
    12-30-12 12:21 PM
  10. howarmat's Avatar
    Wish these statistics were a bit more defined. They use the words "tablets" in regards to Nexus and Galaxy but name the Amazon Kindle Fire and Asus Transformer. I would think that should actually be "Fires" since there are three now and I am pretty sure there are more than one Asus Transformer.

    Any solid stats on the original Fire? I would find it a bit hard to believe that it alone was garnering such numbers because I find the 2nd and 3rd iterations to be far superior.
    They sold something like 5 million original KF in 2011 and maybe a couple million more in 2012 but you are right that the new HD versions are better.
    12-30-12 03:30 PM
  11. LyoobaBerry's Avatar
    I bought mine (64GB) from Currys UK a month ago, for mere 129 and 10 cash back as I took original leather holster with it. If only that kind of deal was possible a year ago, market share would be mch higher. I'll be getting at least one more in months time, if any stay in stock
    12-30-12 03:43 PM
  12. pbluv's Avatar
    This is a good site to get a picture of the market share
    Operating system market share
    12-31-12 04:05 PM
  13. howarmat's Avatar
    But that includes all the BB phones, not just the tablet
    12-31-12 05:19 PM
  14. brianatbb's Avatar
    The playbook certainly hasn't captured much of the market share, you're right. But its RIM's first tablet offering, and they've been steadily improving the OS over the last year. Its a fresh OS and will take some time. My gut tells me that RIM will do just fine in the tablet market (long term), I believe their next tablet offerings will be a huge improvement from the current version - BlackBerry still has a fairly snug grip on the business class - even in America and will continue to hold well in this market. The blackberry OS will continue to be the main product that government and high security firms use (apple and android are hardly evening making an attempt at this market).
    Uh, Rim isn't the only one "steadily improving the OS". Android has improved much more than QNX over the past 18 months, though to be fair Rim's efforts have been focused on BB10. And please, no need to exaggerate Rim's 'hold' over business and government. If BB10 does not meet expectations, that 'hold' will quickly evaporate. Even if it does, expect android and apple to continue to make inroads.
    12-31-12 05:41 PM
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