1. kelton's Avatar
    If I'm going to carry the thing around, it had better be of assistance.

    Ok, so assuming it gets tons of apps and all that. Fine.

    Can it replace a netbook?

    Meaning, can I create and edit documents easily? ... or is it designed for those who merely want a more tolerable web browsing experience.

    I can understand how an Android-pad could take advantage of google docs for "office like" functionality... or how a Windows pad could do the same with it's own office suite.

    With this Playbook having its own OS, I'm assuming that it will not run the current office programs natively... and not sure how they'll resolve it. Perhaps the recently acquired Docs-to-go is the solution?

    I'm desperately seeking small/light solutions to a computer.

    My 9650 (with Dropbox and Docs-to-go) is an amazing solution that is working like a charm. It turns out that I can "text" as quickly as I can write with a pencil, so it is a great note taking device that syncs through dropbox.

    It, of course, has it's compromises. Docs-to-go is a bit clumsy if you want to format quickly as you go. I can deal with it given the amazing advantage of having my "computer" fit in my pocket!

    If this little playbook would include a proper and compatible-with-microsoft office suite...and perhaps a well designed keyboard... this would be cool.

    Otherwise, I'm still a little on the fence with these pads. Is the big advantage that they make portable web surfing a bit more pleasing than through the phone?

    So, how does this thing fit in with doing work? (I guess that's the question) Assuming that you travel around and need to take notes, can this thing help?

    (obviously, if you are just in an office, you've got a PC in front of you.. no problem)

    Kelton
    09-28-10 07:32 AM
  2. _StephenBB81's Avatar
    RIM Purchased DataViz makers of Documents2Go So I really suspect that they will be including Doc2Go on the Tablet, and hopefully they will give Blackberry users the Pro Version for Free, while charging the other platforms a premium.


    RIM does have the Blackberry PlayBook listed on their For Business Blog. though they just said yes it will be for business too but didn't say how.

    With RIM launching B.E.A.M. I suspect there will be enterprise applications made for the PlayBook to help with Enterprise use.
    09-28-10 07:44 AM
  3. meske's Avatar
    I see this as a big hit with salespeople and even corp folks in the boardroom. On the sales side, if it does what it says and connects to your phone (and therefor internal network), you can pull up "under development" web sites / apps and display them to clients without having to vpn into a secure network.

    Likewise, for those that have been using a BB only for years, this might be a good add-on to give them more flexibility. And I assume it will come in around the netbook price, so it will be a great alternative to a full laptop (and netbooks are, in my opinion, underpowered anyway).

    In the boardroom, if this replaces my laptop I'm sold. We'll have to wait and see what this thing really can do.
    09-28-10 08:02 AM
  4. qbnkelt's Avatar
    Justification might be the tricky thing.
    I'd love for us to get it....justifying it would be the initial problem. I'll start planting seeds today....see what feedback I get...

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    09-28-10 08:13 AM
  5. Fubaz's Avatar
    DeRusset, RIM DID NOT purchase DataViz, but only some of their assets.

    Just a clarification that DataViz is still their own entity.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    09-28-10 08:35 AM
  6. _StephenBB81's Avatar
    DeRusset, RIM DID NOT purchase DataViz, but only some of their assets.

    Just a clarification that DataViz is still their own entity.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    * Update - Tuesday, September 7th: RIM confirmed the acquisition via a statement given to Digital Daily: RIM has acquired some of the assets of DataViz and hired the majority of its employees to focus on supporting the BlackBerry platform. Terms of the deal were not disclosed but the transaction was not material to RIM in the context of RIM's financial results. *
    NOT only some of their assets but their employee base, as well.
    I'll give that they are not RIM themselves, but they could justifiably be called a RIM subsidiary unless someone from either company is willing to give greater detail as to the sale.
    09-28-10 09:32 AM
  7. iBlack11's Avatar
    If the mere Blackberry phone has Office Apps, it will be a default on the tablet
    09-28-10 09:47 AM
  8. zrobert's Avatar
    To start with, I love the playbook and my blackberry. Together they are the cornerstone of my communication, organization and productivity. It was not until the other day I ever thought any differently. I was challenged on which applications I use on my playbook for the office by an iphone user.
    I was surprised to find I only use two apps. Conqu and Flexina meetings. Compared to the iphone, my argument of "Blackberry is for business, iphone is for games" I was shut down. The business apps on iphone were useful and brilliant. I'm not sure if anyone else had found this, but I feel let down that there is not more then two business productivity, organization applications to help complete my job. Hopefully if bb10 ever comes to the playbook this will be corrected.
    02-11-13 07:45 AM
  9. Vorkosigan's Avatar
    Perhaps it depends on what business you're in?

    I can do almost everything from my pb that I do at work. I can access all my needed web programs, I take notes, proof and mark up ad copy, and watch webinars.

    About the only I can't do on it is create ad copy graphics - although I could probably do mock ups - haven't actually looked into that but maybe I will.

    My work doesn't lean heavily to reports - and the ones it does are usually powerpoint. I can't create them but I can edit them. And with dropbox my pb has all the docs I need whenever I need them.

    Not to mention when we were having Internet problems at the office I was the only one who could keep working. I consider my pb my mobile office.
    02-11-13 07:58 AM
  10. Xopher's Avatar
    I can do a lot of work things with my PlayBook. Some of the things include:

    - Web access. Bridged to my 9700 keeps me connected pretty much everywhere.
    - Email - as long as it goes through Gmail or my 9700, I can access it. POP accounts only seem to work via wifi on the PlayBook, so I rely on my 9700 and just use Bridge to access email on the 9700 instead.
    - RDM+ keeps my desktop computer screen just a few seconds away. If there is something that was left on my computer, I can access it from the PlayBook. I used to access it using RDM+ on my 9700, but the larger PlayBook screen comes in handy.
    - Orders. My website has an online order system for my photography business. I can access most of the features just fine via PlayBook.
    - Presentations: I mostly do videos and sideshows. I have these all converted to video or ppt and either display them directly on the PlayBook screen, or use HDMI to output. This is one area I think it really helps having the PlayBook, making presentations much more portable.
    - Notes: I use SpringPad for note taking, and Evernote. I prefer the organization of SpringPad, and both are accessible on my computer later. I keep hoping BB10 comes to the PlayBook. Flicking words up would make note taking that much easier.


    The downside:
    - Photo editing is still much better on a computer.
    - Bookkeeping is still better on the computer. No mobile link yet.
    - App development still requires a computer.
    - Accepting credit cards. Most of the swiping devices work with Android for portable processing, but not with the PlayBook. I can still accept credit cards via Square or PayPal, but I have to enter them manually, at a higher charge rate.

    I think the combination of BB and PlayBook make a good set for work. It would definitely benefit from having more apps available, though.
    02-11-13 08:54 AM
  11. slparry's Avatar
    Perhaps it depends on what business you're in?

    I can do almost everything from my pb that I do at work. I can access all my needed web programs, I take notes, proof and mark up ad copy, and watch webinars.

    About the only I can't do on it is create ad copy graphics - although I could probably do mock ups - haven't actually looked into that but maybe I will.

    My work doesn't lean heavily to reports - and the ones it does are usually powerpoint. I can't create them but I can edit them. And with dropbox my pb has all the docs I need whenever I need them.

    Not to mention when we were having Internet problems at the office I was the only one who could keep working. I consider my pb my mobile office.
    If you have a gmail account and google drive storage you can create all sorts of documents in there
    02-11-13 11:13 AM
  12. eve6er69's Avatar
    using google docs i can say it is a pain to alter them. my derby team using skydrive and google docs but it is a real pan to enter in info.

    in short i dont think it is nearly as productive as a computer.
    02-11-13 11:51 AM
  13. k_evjen's Avatar
    Zombie thread...
    02-12-13 12:03 AM
  14. Anjohl's Avatar
    Just my two cents, Docs2Go is the best mobile office clone I have ever used. It feels slick, full-featured, and robust.
    02-12-13 01:31 AM
  15. pronomad's Avatar
    I use my PB at work all the time:

    I'm always bridged during working hours and often at home as well, so my work email follows me everywhere, whether in my office or elsewhere on the compound. On those rare occasions when the office network has a problem, staff can send messages to my Gmail account and voila! back in business.

    I use Docs to Go for notetaking in meetings, and Conqu to keep myself on task.

    PB works great at conferences/workshops: again, Bridge keeps me updated on happenings in the office, wifi lets me browse during breaks without killer roaming charges, and the camera comes in handy to keep a record of flipcharts, etc.

    When I'm traveling, GPS and Google Maps help me find my way around unfamiliar cities/countries, while Google Translate helps smooth out those awkward communication moments. Downloaded movies, TV shows, music, and books come in handy on the plane or when the hotel doesn't have any decent channels in my language.

    All in all, I find my PB to be an invaluable tool; it's definitely helped me be more productive.
    02-13-13 05:27 PM
  16. lcjr's Avatar
    If I'm going to carry the thing around, it had better be of assistance.

    Ok, so assuming it gets tons of apps and all that. Fine.

    Can it replace a netbook?

    Meaning, can I create and edit documents easily? ... or is it designed for those who merely want a more tolerable web browsing experience.

    I can understand how an Android-pad could take advantage of google docs for "office like" functionality... or how a Windows pad could do the same with it's own office suite.

    With this Playbook having its own OS, I'm assuming that it will not run the current office programs natively... and not sure how they'll resolve it. Perhaps the recently acquired Docs-to-go is the solution?

    I'm desperately seeking small/light solutions to a computer.

    My 9650 (with Dropbox and Docs-to-go) is an amazing solution that is working like a charm. It turns out that I can "text" as quickly as I can write with a pencil, so it is a great note taking device that syncs through dropbox.

    It, of course, has it's compromises. Docs-to-go is a bit clumsy if you want to format quickly as you go. I can deal with it given the amazing advantage of having my "computer" fit in my pocket!

    If this little playbook would include a proper and compatible-with-microsoft office suite...and perhaps a well designed keyboard... this would be cool.

    Otherwise, I'm still a little on the fence with these pads. Is the big advantage that they make portable web surfing a bit more pleasing than through the phone?

    So, how does this thing fit in with doing work? (I guess that's the question) Assuming that you travel around and need to take notes, can this thing help?

    (obviously, if you are just in an office, you've got a PC in front of you.. no problem)

    Kelton
    Well, I use my Playbook all the time for work. It goes with me to meetings and I use Evernote and Groovynotes most of the time because of the things you can do with the notes. i also use the Docs2Go to open and manipulate Excel or PowerPoint charts and graphs. I can also connect it to a TV monitor and/or a presentor to get a large display. Being able to check my email, stocks, and games during a boring meeting really helps. The more you use this Playbook the better you'll get at using it. Not to mention its only a 7 inch tablet so its easy to carry, doesn't take up much room at a conference table, and gets the attention of everyone still taking notes with a pen and paper. Last week I made a great impresson when a colleague was in a desperate rush to get out of a meeting so he could relay the latest guidance to his team. I had already done this before the first person walked out the door. That guy was so impressed he wentout and bought a Playbook and carries it everywhere now.
    02-13-13 06:12 PM
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