11-21-13 06:19 AM
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  1. rthonpm's Avatar
    Network segmentation is your friend! For my business, we have a guest wireless network that is completely independent of the regular network, different subnet, different permissions, even different passwords for the infrastructure devices. For myself, since I do contract IT support, I have several customers who have created accounts on their networks for me to interact and either manage, or help manage as the case may be, servers or other devices that I support for them. I use my PlayBook to access some servers that run headless either through RDP or SSH. In each case, I'm running a device that meets the IT management requirements of the customer, and also allows me to do what I need.
    11-20-13 02:39 PM
  2. sad_old_man's Avatar
    I see what Sad Old Man is saying: if you're using someone's private (home or corporate) network, your device has to be provisioned for access in some way, shape, or form. In my case, I have a RADIUS account on all of the networks I use my PlayBook on, as well as AD accounts for three of them for RDP use.

    You can't just hope to use an authenticated network without any kind of permission, so even if the IT manager doesn't have access to your files (which s/he wouldn't), they'll still know what it is.

    In my comment as well, I wasn't talking about changing the hostname of the device (Playbook-last four of PIN), but the user name set for file sharing, which is just playbook.
    If he or she doesn't, then you are not on he or she's network?
    11-20-13 02:55 PM
  3. FF22's Avatar
    psssst baby pm me your password?
    His/her's password is buttchaff
    11-21-13 12:08 AM
  4. ChrisMay's Avatar
    Then you are only granting them access to your wifi and not your network? Still be careful under these circumstances because having access to your router could possibly give them access to your system????????? ROUTERS ARE PROGRAMMABLE ?
    True, but one could argue that they are obtaining internet access using our broadband connection, so they are connecting to the company network, but only in a very limited way. The WiFi router is obviously also connected to the rest of the network, so that company wireless devices can access the required resources, but guest access to the router is much more restricted.

    They are only getting access to the Internet VIA the router, they don't actually have access to the router itself. That is guarded by a different password to the WiFi access one...
    11-21-13 03:55 AM
  5. sad_old_man's Avatar
    True, but one could argue that they are obtaining internet access using our broadband connection, so they are connecting to the company network, but only in a very limited way. The WiFi router is obviously also connected to the rest of the network, so that company wireless devices can access the required resources, but guest access to the router is much more restricted.

    They are only getting access to the Internet VIA the router, they don't actually have access to the router itself. That is guarded by a different password to the WiFi access one...
    Access to the router as a gateway to the outside world WAN is totally different to access to the LAN. You are merely being allowed to use the gateway to access the Internet.
    11-21-13 06:19 AM
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