1. azrin640's Avatar
    I am wondering why the US market is so important for RIM, how big is it? we know that us population is around 300 million compared to eu of 700 million, asia of nearly 4 biilion and africa of 2billion.

    Samsung started a lot of marketing in asia and look where are they now.

    I see the preference of Rim in us market for the playbook with all the discount, PR, marketing and such. Is us market that important?
    01-15-12 12:27 PM
  2. FF22's Avatar
    I guess it is the trend setter - good, bad or in between!
    01-15-12 12:45 PM
  3. aha's Avatar
    US market is big not by population, but by amount of money spent... which is converted from disposable income, consumer confidence, spending habits etc
    azrin640 likes this.
    01-15-12 12:53 PM
  4. Flexin's Avatar
    I am wondering why the US market is so important for RIM, how big is it? we know that us population is around 300 million compared to eu of 700 million, asia of nearly 4 biilion and africa of 2billion.

    Samsung started a lot of marketing in asia and look where are they now.

    I see the preference of Rim in us market for the playbook with all the discount, PR, marketing and such. Is us market that important?
    Maybe they need to offer the discounts in the US market to get the ball rolling. Maybe that isn't the case in other markets.

    James
    01-15-12 12:59 PM
  5. Daruba's Avatar
    US market is big not by population, but by amount of money spent... which is converted from disposable income, consumer confidence, spending habits etc
    I think you nailed it here. The USA are filled with spending-crazy people and are among the first to complain about little things.
    Feed-back is important for hard- and software developers.
    01-15-12 01:01 PM
  6. cherolis's Avatar
    I am wondering why the US market is so important for RIM, how big is it? we know that us population is around 300 million compared to eu of 700 million, asia of nearly 4 biilion and africa of 2billion.

    Samsung started a lot of marketing in asia and look where are they now.

    I see the preference of Rim in us market for the playbook with all the discount, PR, marketing and such. Is us market that important?

    Well... lets start with the fact that the 300 million in America actually have money... virtually all of those 300 million can afford playbooks. Where as only a tiny percentage of asians and africans can.
    01-15-12 01:02 PM
  7. azrin640's Avatar
    Well... lets start with the fact that the 300 million in America actually have money... virtually all of those 300 million can afford playbooks. Where as only a tiny percentage of asians and africans can.
    Taken into accounts of 46 million under poverty line and 13 million of unemployed, it is hard pressed to believe that. i am not saying americans don't have money, we all know since bretton wood it is easier to print money from air.
    01-15-12 01:45 PM
  8. justincase1911's Avatar
    Don't let the poverty numbers in the US fool you. There are a lot of "poor" folks in the US who have smartphones, big screen TV, and a sat dish. The US is a big market and tends to set trends around the world.
    01-15-12 02:22 PM
  9. blue-b's Avatar
    Taken into accounts of 46 million under poverty line and 13 million of unemployed, it is hard pressed to believe that. i am not saying americans don't have money, we all know since bretton wood it is easier to print money from air.
    True, but if you were to stack everyone in the world together, I'm sure we'd be shocked at where we sit globally, many of us with modest incomes, may be closer to the 1% when looking at things globally.
    01-15-12 02:30 PM
  10. alnamvet68's Avatar
    I would go further to say most of the bottom 99% in America could very well be 1 percenters everywhere else in the world.
    01-15-12 02:49 PM
  11. 123berryaddicted's Avatar
    I would go further to say most of the bottom 99% in America could very well be 1 percenters everywhere else in the world.
    Hahahahahahaha... You obviously have never been to Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Germany, France, Switzerland... To name a few....
    01-15-12 03:05 PM
  12. cherolis's Avatar
    Taken into accounts of 46 million under poverty line and 13 million of unemployed, it is hard pressed to believe that. i am not saying americans don't have money, we all know since bretton wood it is easier to print money from air.
    Remember the poverty line in america translates to ultra wealthy in most of africa and rural asia.
    01-15-12 04:43 PM
  13. clem1604's Avatar
    Well... lets start with the fact that the 300 million in America actually have money... virtually all of those 300 million can afford playbooks. Where as only a tiny percentage of asians and africans can.
    That's pretty funny, when there are people in the state cannot afford to fill up their cars with gas because it went up 10 cent. Not every american can afford PB/smartphone ... etc, but I think American are more like to spent more on gadget in proportion to what they earned, compare to european or asian. Partly due to the culture of spenting/shopping. Nowhere in the world have so much TV commerical or special shopping events like black friday, labor day, superbow shopping weekend, college basketball semi-final .. etc. Also there are more publication in north america on gadget reviews which driven the sales. Others countries are more practical not buying for the sake of it. I am by no meant to stir up any debate on cultural differences, just my observation.
    P.S. that's also remind me why I hate ipad/iphone TV commerical, keep telling me I don't have the Apps if I don't own one. Did they ask me if I want the Apps in the first place.
    01-16-12 04:29 AM
  14. cherolis's Avatar
    People... I am not bragging about america. I don't even like america. I am just pointing out an observable reality. Its not my fault China keeps lending america money to live beyond its means.
    01-16-12 08:34 AM
  15. BBplaybookJS's Avatar
    Lets not turn this into a US bashing thread. The US has 300 million people, many with lots of discretionary funds to spend. That is nothing to sneeze at, as the saying goes. Which is not to say the same is not true in Canada , most of Europe and parts of Asia
    01-16-12 10:42 AM
  16. azrin640's Avatar
    i always visited kitco forum Gold, Silver, Gold Price, Silver Price, Gold Rate, Gold News | Kitco , as you know kitco forumers is all about statistic of us economy.

    The way they talk down there as if the us of a is going to face something like Greece. Some even stock food in their basement even more with the declining of us currency vs the world. Who might have think gold shoot up to usd16 hundred per gram from 800 in 2009. that means your usd is devalued to half.

    Over spending might get you in trouble sooner or later.

    Is rim making the right move spending on marketing for a market such as us?
    01-16-12 11:01 AM
  17. azrin640's Avatar
    I guess it is the trend setter - good, bad or in between!
    You might be right. us has their national products, celebrities.
    01-16-12 11:05 AM
  18. VerryBestr's Avatar
    I am wondering why the US market is so important for RIM, how big is it? we know that us population is around 300 million compared to eu of 700 million, asia of nearly 4 biilion and africa of 2billion. ... I see the preference of Rim in us market for the playbook with all the discount, PR, marketing and such. Is us market that important?
    I would argue that the US consumer market is crucial to RIM because success in this market is essential in protecting its enterprise position.

    From what I have read, Nokia has about as large a share of worldwide enterprise mobile phones as RIM. Nokia is essentially absent in the U.S. So RIM's enterprise business is partcularly strong in the U.S.

    In the last quarter, RIM said that 24% of its revenue came from the U.S. However, I think a larger share of its profits came from the U.S. I believe that RIM's enterprise business is more profitable than its consumer business, and its enterprise business is more concentrated in the U.S. than its consumer business. Moreover, for the many international corporations headquartered in the U.S., decisions about mobile phones will be strongly influenced by RIM's success or failure in the U.S.

    If RIM does not succeed in getting the PlayBook into enterprises, many/most of them will turn to iPads. If that were to happen, iPhones would replace BlackBerry phones even faster than is the case today. CIOs (chief information officers) would feel even more uncertain about RIM's ability to make the transition to QNX phones, and they would seriously worry about RIM's very future in the enterprise.

    If RIM cannot make phones and tablets that consumers want to carry, then those consumers (who are also workers) will complain about their BlackBerry devices. Eventually, as the competition erodes BlackBerry's advantages, then more enterprises will let their employees use the devices they like.

    So it is important for RIM that the PlayBook and future QNX phones succeed in the U.S.

    Consider these quotes from recent articles:

    | Secret CIO: RIM, What's Going On? - Global-cio - Executive insights/interviews - Informationweek
    September 29, 2011

    I recently attended the InformationWeek 500 Conference in Dana Point, Calif. This conference attracts senior IT leaders from across the country. I saw many iPads, notebooks, iPhones, Android devices--and still many BlackBerrys--in use. But not one RIM tablet. Isn't the BlackBerry Playbook the first professional-grade tablet? So shouldn't some of us professionals be carrying one?

    I have a Playbook, but it was given to me. And I didn't take it with me to the conference. I'd be too embarrassed to pull it out of its case. I'd know the glances that would come my way. I'd hear, "You really use that thing?" I shouldn't care what people think. And I don't really, if I thought the device was just the right thing to use. But no one carries a Playbook, and I bet most feel as I do. RIM's tablet has its problems.

    The bridge connection to a BlackBerry handheld doesn't make much sense. It's a bit flaky. It does have some terrific design features--why can't every device have HDMI output? But it doesn't seem to matter.

    At least not to developers, who continue to produce great apps for Apple and Android devices, but not for the Playbook. A tablet without applications is ultimately just an interesting bit of history. RIM made many promises in May of things to come. It needs to deliver.

    I don't get it, RIM. What's going on? You've launched some new smartphones--is that it? My company has a significant investment in your platform, and I make decisions based on ROI. I've made the investment, and my return is starting to erode. Before long, my friends (and colleagues) will be laughing at me. (I hate it when people laugh at me.)

    Hello? RIM? Hello?


    | Research In Motion needs a coherent enterprise strategy - FT.com
    October 22, 2011

    When I asked an audience of chief information officers at a panel discussion on mobility that I was chairing at Gartner’s Symposium/ITexpo in Orlando, Florida this week how many had BlackBerry Enterprise Servers installed in their companies, two-thirds raised their hands. Then I asked how many expected to have the servers installed in two years’ time and astonishingly no one raised their hand.

    Obviously this was little more than a straw poll, but its dire implications for RIM’s enterprise business – at least in North America – are borne out by anecdotal reports of companies, particularly those in the financial services industry, abandoning BlackBerrys and by a new survey from Enterprise Management Associates.

    The survey, undertaken last month before the latest network service problems and based on employees who use smartphones at companies with more than 10,000 employees, revealed that 30 per cent would like to switch to another smartphone vendor if they could. In contrast, 100 per cent of Android-based smartphone users and 98 per cent of enterprise iPhone users said they were happy with their devices.
    Last edited by VerryBestr; 01-16-12 at 12:54 PM.
    01-16-12 12:42 PM
  19. esqlaw's Avatar
    The market for the US is bigger than most locales because more people buy stuff. Simple. Go look up the numbers yourself to see how big it actually is. The most informative number would be how many tablets are sold in the US compared to other areas.
    01-16-12 12:55 PM
  20. ADozenEggs@aol.com's Avatar
    I am wondering why the US market is so important for RIM, how big is it? we know that us population is around 300 million compared to eu of 700 million, asia of nearly 4 biilion and africa of 2billion.

    Samsung started a lot of marketing in asia and look where are they now.

    I see the preference of Rim in us market for the playbook with all the discount, PR, marketing and such. Is us market that important?
    America is the world's consumer economy. The "average" American has most disposable cash than many other countries.

    Here in New York City. The median household income is roughly $60k per annum. with a population of 19mm.

    That equates to 19mm consumers with enough income to make at least 1 big electronic purchase per year in just NYC alone.

    I would argue that a large percentage of electronic purchases in the U.S. come from urban and suburban areas as opposed to rural areas.

    R.I.M can't walk away from the U.S. market and the U.S. consumer base. It is what it is.



    OT: As an American who has lived overseas in Europe and in Asia. I will be one of the first to say that this country is not perfect. But I would never say I don't like my country. I think Americans who who find fault with the homeland should try living abroad. I would think, in many cases, you might come to appreciate some of the things you take for granted.
    Blacklac likes this.
    01-16-12 01:12 PM
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