07-22-12 11:21 AM
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  1. axllebeer's Avatar
    I'm really unsure how I feel about this idea or not but I think it might be a good thing if shortly before the release of the 1st BB10 phone, they should first push the BB10 update to the PlayBook. If it's going to be as great as its hyped to be, then getting it out there ASAP on existing hardware would be cool. Might spark the interest and when the phones hit, it could cause bigger sales right off the bat.
    07-21-12 01:38 PM
  2. Zildjian71's Avatar
    To put Mr. T into the same context as Mr. B and Mr. L is like putting old wine in a brand new bottle.

    Putting the past track record on Mr. T is really ignorant of the changes that are in progress at RIM.

    Mr. T has to rebuild RIM almost from the ground up. Fortunately he didn't have a negative balance sheet to tackle as well.

    Not making excuses just taking into account one of the most demanding assignments anyone has ever taken on in the tech world by anyone ever.

    Mr. T is either going to come out of this as the biggest fool or a tech/corporate god. Only time will tell.

    Just my observation.
    07-21-12 03:14 PM
  3. IndustryWatcher's Avatar
    RIM will not be abandoning the Playbook anytime soon as it is an integral part of RIM’s BB10 strategy. (Its secondary goal was to enter the tablet market.) With RIM moving towards BB10, it knew that this new direction would not be compatible with its existing OS. (From a UI experience as well as with apps.) What it needed was a device that could be used to showcase the capabilities of the new OS and that developers could get behind and start building apps for. So you can consider the Playbook as ver 1.0 of the new BB10. This way when BB10 does eventually launch, it will have a relatively full app catalogue, and most of its bugs will have been worked out on the playbook. (When BB10 launches it will be with ver 2.0 of the OS.) Keeping to this line of thinking a 4G version of the Playbook is a needed component to the development of BB10 as it will deal with the integration of the communications stack into the overall OS.

    Sorry RIM but I couldn't keep your secret anymore
    07-22-12 07:07 AM
  4. FF22's Avatar
    RIM will not be abandoning the Playbook anytime soon as it is an integral part of RIMs BB10 strategy. (Its secondary goal was to enter the tablet market.) With RIM moving towards BB10, it knew that this new direction would not be compatible with its existing OS. (From a UI experience as well as with apps.) What it needed was a device that could be used to showcase the capabilities of the new OS and that developers could get behind and start building apps for. So you can consider the Playbook as ver 1.0 of the new BB10. This way when BB10 does eventually launch, it will have a relatively full app catalogue, and most of its bugs will have been worked out on the playbook. (When BB10 launches it will be with ver 2.0 of the OS.) Keeping to this line of thinking a 4G version of the Playbook is a needed component to the development of BB10 as it will deal with the integration of the communications stack into the overall OS.

    Sorry RIM but I couldn't keep your secret anymore
    You may be right about what they initially intended and my thoughts may be a bit harsh - what the pb did was showcase their ineptitude.
    07-22-12 08:22 AM
  5. cgull's Avatar
    Obviously I'm being sarcastic here, but it's to try and illustrate a point - RIM's track record of following through on "promises" is less than stellar these past number of years.
    Agree 100%. RIM has lost all credibility at this point. The real question we should be asking is has the market abandoned the PB?
    07-22-12 08:28 AM
  6. cgk's Avatar
    Not this revisionist nonsense again - the truth is that honestly thought that it could compete against the iPad on price and clean up.

    Sent from my Lumia 800 using Board Express
    07-22-12 08:28 AM
  7. TGR1's Avatar
    I think it may depend on 1) how well the Nexus 7 does and 2) how well the Microsoft tablets do.

    The Nexus 7 will put a ceiling on price that will be very difficult for any vendor to crack without compelling extras. This latter Microsoft has with Office (although it is unclear whether it will be offered on their 7" tablets - MS may or may not change strategy) that gives the the latter company a considerable leg up, particularly with business users.

    It is very unlikely that RIM can set premium pricing on any future Playbook. Consequently I believe they have to cut features or quality somewhere. That starts a vicious cycle of making it less attractive, therefore less sales and revenue/profit, etc. IMO I think it's a money pit for RIM but right now, as their flagship and only QNX product, they can't abandon it publically.
    07-22-12 11:21 AM
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