04-07-21 10:26 AM
39 12
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  1. Alessandra Pidone's Avatar
    Is someone still using bb Passport as main device??

    I would like to do it, cause I love blackberry, but it's hard to leave the utilities from android.

    BTW, here I am using my BlackBerry Passport SE. Someone else using it?

    Posted via CB10
    04-05-21 01:37 AM
  2. mh1983's Avatar
    It sounds like you're quite comfortable with Android already. BB10 devices are great and the Passport is a beast, but it'll likely be a difficult transition for you.

    BB10 has an outdated Android run time so some Android apps may actually work, but the more of those you have, the more the Passport will get bogged down.

    If you can get by with just email, texting, light browsing, pic taking (has a nice camera), the Passport might be a good option but you have to accept that OS's limitations. You could just use it as a nightstand device -- makes a great phablet for podcasts/music, email, etc.

    I went back and forth on Android and BB10 for about a year. In the end, I stuck with Android (on a Keyone)...in a "can't beat em, join em" kinda way, but ultimately it's a less headachy experience as much as I miss things about BB10.
    Last edited by mh1983; 04-05-21 at 09:29 AM.
    saint300 and pdr733 like this.
    04-05-21 06:29 AM
  3. the_boon's Avatar
    Don't...

    Either go for a KEY2, or wait for the new Unihertz keyboard phone, or OnwardMobility's phone.
    mh1983 likes this.
    04-05-21 07:56 AM
  4. brookie229's Avatar
    Is someone still using bb Passport as main device??

    I would like to do it, cause I love blackberry, but it's hard to leave the utilities from android.

    BTW, here I am using my BlackBerry Passport SE. Someone else using it?

    Posted via CB10
    I'm still using a Passport as my main device (6 plus years now) but I am a light user and require few services and apps. I'm using it as a communication device primarily with texting, calls and email and beyond that it is fairly limited as others have stated.
    mh1983 likes this.
    04-05-21 09:38 AM
  5. saint300's Avatar
    Don't...

    Either go for a KEY2, or wait for the new Unihertz keyboard phone, or OnwardMobility's phone.
    Agree. But if a Key2 is ridiculously expensive, which it is, you could always get a Keyone Black 4/64; you'll be just as happy. The Passport SE was my main device for a couple of years, but I had to finally move on. Now I use a Keyone as the one mentioned above and have a Priv as a backup phone. All's well.
    04-05-21 11:33 AM
  6. conite's Avatar
    Agree. But if a Key2 is ridiculously expensive, which it is, you could always get a Keyone Black 4/64; you'll be just as happy. The Passport SE was my main device for a couple of years, but I had to finally move on. Now I use a Keyone as the one mentioned above and have a Priv as a backup phone. All's well.
    Rejecting security concerns is not an option for most folks though.
    04-05-21 11:41 AM
  7. saint300's Avatar
    Rejecting security concerns is not an option for most folks though.
    Well, it's not an option for you, as you've made pretty clear time and again. And while I can agree with you to some extend, the thing is we have discussed this issue so many times here that I've lost count. And another fact is that millions of people globally are still using earlier Android versions and this won't change soon.

    But to come back to your point, only a US Key2 version still gets, somehow, security patches; so all the other users should get rid of their phones??

    Also, it has been said that if one is careful with how they use their phone, even Android 6 is OK, ergo the Priv! Let alone the Keyone black edition 4/64...
    mh1983 and bh7171 like this.
    04-05-21 12:04 PM
  8. conite's Avatar

    Also, it has been said that if one is careful with how they use their phone, even Android 6 is OK, ergo the Priv! Let alone the Keyone black edition 4/64...
    Not by any security expert it hasn't. Nor do the poor habits of others define good policy.

    And yes, unless one either has a North American KEY², or a global device on which an autoloader can be installed, then a new device is in order.

    You can obviously do anything you wish, but I feel the need to reiterate the security issue for the sake of other folks who may be looking at this thread. It's nothing personal.

    I am committed to the issue of security (likely the reason behind my historical bias in favour of Blackberry devices), so this is something I will never ignore.
    04-05-21 12:19 PM
  9. saint300's Avatar
    Not by any security expert it hasn't. Nor do the poor habits of others define good policy.

    And yes, unless one either has a North American KEY², or a global device on which an autoloader can be installed, then a new device is in order.

    You can obviously do anything you wish, but I feel the need to reiterate the security issue for the sake of other folks who may be looking at this thread. It's nothing personal.

    I am committed to the issue of security (likely the reason behind my historical bias in favour of Blackberry devices), so this is something I will never ignore.
    I know. I have read all your relative posts. But based on what you are saying, you are practically forwarding the idea that people who don't own a NA key2, should go to a slab, be that a Samsung, or, God forbid, an Apple device. So, no Blackberry anymore then. Personally, I can't do that, but that's only me?
    the_boon and bh7171 like this.
    04-05-21 12:29 PM
  10. conite's Avatar
    I know. I have read all your relative posts. But based on what you are saying, you are practically forwarding the idea that people who don't own a NA key2, should go to a slab, be that a Samsung, or, God forbid, an Apple device. So, no Blackberry anymore then. Personally, I can't do that, but that's only me?
    Well, about 3/4 of all KEY² devices can be made up-to-date either OTA or with an autoloader, so it's not as bad as you think. Although there are no more safe KEY² LE devices.

    But yes, I'm aware of the implications of diligent security policy.

    Since BlackBerry Android is already well behind the 8-ball by being between 3 and 5 OS versions out of date, the only salvation is security patches. Without those, things are pretty grim.
    Last edited by conite; 04-05-21 at 12:50 PM.
    04-05-21 12:40 PM
  11. FortressBB10's Avatar
    Is someone still using bb Passport as main device??

    I would like to do it, cause I love blackberry, but it's hard to leave the utilities from android.

    BTW, here I am using my BlackBerry Passport SE. Someone else using it?

    Posted via CB10
    I use an ATT PP as main device. I carry a slim Android for limited apps. I don't see what the big deal is unless you're a teenager constantly using social media.

    Posted via CB10
    mh1983 and bh7171 like this.
    04-05-21 01:08 PM
  12. FortressBB10's Avatar
    I use an ATT PP as main device. I carry a slim Android for limited apps. I don't see what the big deal is unless you're a teenager constantly using social media.

    Posted via CB10
    I should add that the PP can run Android well if an old version of the app in question still functions or (like with Audible) the publisher wants to keep its app compatible with old OS versions.

    Posted via CB10
    04-05-21 01:15 PM
  13. Dunt Dunt Dunt's Avatar
    I use an ATT PP as main device. I carry a slim Android for limited apps. I don't see what the big deal is unless you're a teenager constantly using social media.

    Posted via CB10
    I'm not a teenager....

    But I don't won't to carry two devices around, and in 2021 a Passport doesn't do what most still need from mobile work platform. Zoom, Teams and Slack are a huge part of my work week now... And while WhatsApp works fine on BB10, my Z10 is way too slow to handle the few Android Apps that do work on it - even the browser is painful to use, when it works. The Passport might be marginally better... but nothing like todays hardware.

    I use touch free payments about 95% of the time... either in an app or using Apple Pay (Google Pay would be fine if it worked on a BB). Then there are the scheduling solutions that keep up with appointments and reservations while letting me know how long it will take to arrive at a destination. Ability to seamless connect to my Car or Home and their smart features. The things a modern smartphone are capable of, go way beyond social media.

    In the end there are a lot of reasons a PP wouldn't meet the needs of some looking for more than a feature phone with email.
    pdr733 likes this.
    04-05-21 01:42 PM
  14. conite's Avatar
    I don't see what the big deal is unless you're a teenager constantly using social media.

    Posted via CB10
    OMG, seriously?
    04-05-21 01:50 PM
  15. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    I use an ATT PP as main device. I carry a slim Android for limited apps. I don't see what the big deal is unless you're a teenager constantly using social media.

    Posted via CB10
    That's a hilarious statement. Most if not all employers and corporate vendors have required all types of modern apps in the COVID-19 era. Not a single app of which I count at least five would ever be considered a teenager social media app.

    If you're dual-carrying Android/iOS device now with your Passport, unless you're said teenager, have just contradicted your own claim since it's a big enough deal to dual-carry yourself. Face it, the Passport isn't a smartphone in the practical sense beyond the @brookie229 accurate depiction.
    pdr733 likes this.
    04-05-21 01:53 PM
  16. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    I know. I have read all your relative posts. But based on what you are saying, you are practically forwarding the idea that people who don't own a NA key2, should go to a slab, be that a Samsung, or, God forbid, an Apple device. So, no Blackberry anymore then. Personally, I can't do that, but that's only me?
    Pretty much if you're truly wanting modern definition of mobile security that even BlackBerry Limited itself preaches about in 2021 period. When the original company, which has no dog in the fight, and everyone claims is so great, says it, we should trust reason we're fans, no?
    04-05-21 01:58 PM
  17. Dunt Dunt Dunt's Avatar
    Pretty much if you're truly wanting modern definition of mobile security that even BlackBerry Limited itself preaches about in 2021 period. When the original company, which has no dog in the fight, and everyone claims is so great, says it, we should trust reason we're fans, no?
    Does BlackBerry still allow their employee's to connect and access company information using Passports and KEYones?
    04-05-21 02:09 PM
  18. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    Does BlackBerry still allow their employee's to connect and access company information using Passports and KEYones?
    LOL - John Chen himself escorts you from the building.
    mh1983 likes this.
    04-05-21 02:30 PM
  19. mh1983's Avatar
    Zoom, Teams and Slack are a huge part of my work week now...
    My condolences...
    bh7171 likes this.
    04-05-21 03:58 PM
  20. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    Does BlackBerry still allow their employee's to connect and access company information using Passports and KEYones?
    I think you know better. BB themselves have been issuing iPhones for years now.
    04-06-21 10:37 AM
  21. bh7171's Avatar
    Well, it's not an option for you, as you've made pretty clear time and again. And while I can agree with you to some extend, the thing is we have discussed this issue so many times here that I've lost count. And another fact is that millions of people globally are still using earlier Android versions and this won't change soon.

    But to come back to your point, only a US Key2 version still gets, somehow, security patches; so all the other users should get rid of their phones??

    Also, it has been said that if one is careful with how they use their phone, even Android 6 is OK, ergo the Priv! Let alone the Keyone black edition 4/64...
    I agree. It's a broken record. If people use any device irresponsibly (even the latest models) they "could" be subject to issues if they were to do x,y,z and then w on their device. If a user of any more recent Android device sticks to GPS or reputable sites for application updates (the numero uno attack vector), uses a good password, pin or fingerprint biometric, a email provider that scans email, a browser that limits tracking and ads and a service like NetGuard for all other applications then one is damn near as safe as one can be and the other chatter is just "scare" . IF any of the older Android versions and the hundreds of millions of users with said devices were seriously "at risk" then the applications that run on them would cease to exist or no longer be maintained or operational for said OS versions. (and of course this does happen) But does anyone here know of anyone who has had a BlackBerry of any kind "hacked"? (I know of celebrities that have had their iCloud hacked or people that have had issues on their computers i.e. (Ransomware) but nobody with a BlackBerry of any kind to my knowledge or that has been published)

    Cars are a good analogy. A 5 or 10 year old vehicle lacks all the latest and greatest safety technology BUT it absolutely has very little to do with the safety of the occupants. If maintained and driven safely and in accordance with laws it's safer than a drunk or drug induced persons in a new car. The number one factor in ANY vehicles or technology usage and safety is the operator/driver. Similarly to handsets people are keeping vehicles longer and longer because they continue to operate fine for most persons actual usage of smartphones.
    mh1983 and saint300 like this.
    04-06-21 11:11 AM
  22. conite's Avatar
    I agree. It's a broken record. If people use any device irresponsibly (even the latest models) they "could" be subject to issues if they were to do x,y,z and then w on their device. If a user of any more recent Android device sticks to GPS or reputable sites for application updates (the numero uno attack vector), uses a good password, pin or fingerprint biometric, a email provider that scans email, a browser that limits tracking and ads and a service like NetGuard for all other applications then one is damn near as safe as one can be and the other chatter is just "scare" . IF any of the older Android versions and the hundreds of millions of users with said devices were seriously "at risk" then the applications that run on them would cease to exist or no longer be maintained or operational for said OS versions. (and of course this does happen) But does anyone here know of anyone who has had a BlackBerry of any kind "hacked"? (I know of celebrities that have had their iCloud hacked or people that have had issues on their computers i.e. (Ransomware) but nobody with a BlackBerry of any kind to my knowledge or that has been published)

    Cars are a good analogy. A 5 or 10 year old vehicle lacks all the latest and greatest safety technology BUT it absolutely has very little to do with the safety of the occupants. If maintained and driven safely and in accordance with laws it's safer than a drunk or drug induced persons in a new car. The number one factor in ANY vehicles or technology usage and safety is the operator/driver. Similarly to handsets people are keeping vehicles longer and longer because they continue to operate fine for most persons actual usage of smartphones.
    For every time I see "it's perfectly safe", I will counter with "no it's not".

    There are two sides to a broken record.

    There is a REASON why enterprise is moving to n-1 OS version / 3-month patch policies despite the great expense.

    There is a REASON why independent security analysts are touting the same given the results of their own research.

    There is a REASON why security patch support timeframes are becoming the big deals that they are, even though it hurts those same manufacturers by extending product lifecycles.
    Last edited by conite; 04-06-21 at 11:49 AM.
    04-06-21 11:39 AM
  23. bh7171's Avatar
    For every time I see "it's perfectly safe", I will counter with "no it's not".

    There are two sides to a broken record.

    There is a REASON why enterprise is moving to n-1 OS version / 3-month patch policies despite the great expense.

    There is a REASON why independent security analysts are touting the same given the results of their own research.

    There is a REASON why security patch support timeframes are becoming the big deals that they are, even though it hurts those same manufacturers by extending product lifecycles.
    https://androidenterprisepartners.wi...1617730527#!/1
    04-06-21 12:37 PM
  24. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    I agree. It's a broken record. If people use any device irresponsibly (even the latest models) they "could" be subject to issues if they were to do x,y,z and then w on their device. If a user of any more recent Android device sticks to GPS or reputable sites for application updates (the numero uno attack vector), uses a good password, pin or fingerprint biometric, a email provider that scans email, a browser that limits tracking and ads and a service like NetGuard for all other applications then one is damn near as safe as one can be and the other chatter is just "scare" . IF any of the older Android versions and the hundreds of millions of users with said devices were seriously "at risk" then the applications that run on them would cease to exist or no longer be maintained or operational for said OS versions. (and of course this does happen) But does anyone here know of anyone who has had a BlackBerry of any kind "hacked"? (I know of celebrities that have had their iCloud hacked or people that have had issues on their computers i.e. (Ransomware) but nobody with a BlackBerry of any kind to my knowledge or that has been published)

    Cars are a good analogy. A 5 or 10 year old vehicle lacks all the latest and greatest safety technology BUT it absolutely has very little to do with the safety of the occupants. If maintained and driven safely and in accordance with laws it's safer than a drunk or drug induced persons in a new car. The number one factor in ANY vehicles or technology usage and safety is the operator/driver. Similarly to handsets people are keeping vehicles longer and longer because they continue to operate fine for most persons actual usage of smartphones.
    If "should be good enough" is good enough, why should any OEM ever update the OS, worry about security updates or BlackBerry security model even need to exist separately?

    The privacy and liability issues are real it seems until people have to give up a favorite device? I wasn't ever really sure about issues nor did I care until employers and vendors started the X-1 OS requirements and currently supported device type language in contracts.

    The system breaches cost serious money under federal laws now. Does the average independent contractor want to lose a contract or employee get fired because of "should be good enough or similar"?
    04-06-21 01:46 PM
  25. conite's Avatar
    You're also aware that they specifically mandate a maximum of 3 months between patches.

    Your link simply points to an abysmal policing issue.
    04-06-21 02:46 PM
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