05-20-14 09:03 AM
84 1234
tools
  1. Sith_Apprentice's Avatar
    Medical devices require VERY specific display technologies that MUST be approved for use. We would see the display being approved by the FDA before launch if it is coming to the US. If it isnt approved (correct DPI/PPI, dimensions, white balance, and color depiction) it cannot be legally used.
    04-16-14 08:15 PM
  2. NYC10065's Avatar
    Agreed. BlackBerry has to stay the course. Eventually even hipsters, teenagers and college/university students need to get a job and grow out of their toys

    Q10SQN100-3/10.2.1.2228, Z30, Z10, iP5, SGS3
    Toys? Funny, most senior executives and professionals I know grew out of their Blackberries into (mostly) iPhones and (some) Samsungs over the past 3 or so years and the drop in BB's marketshare underscores that migration (unless you want to pretend that all of that drop is by high school and university students who used to love their BB prosumer device).

    The only ones that seem to be hanging on to their Blackberries work for government.
    mspace81 likes this.
    04-16-14 09:26 PM
  3. Andrew4life's Avatar
    It makes no sense at all that Windermere would be what they are developing with NantHealth.
    In fact, Windermere has been mentioned for a long time already, and also the news release by BlackBerry also clearly says they aren't sure how everything is going to pan out yet. So I would put this all at a very early stage of development
    Knightcrawler likes this.
    04-16-14 09:45 PM
  4. DenverRalphy's Avatar
    Medical devices require VERY specific display technologies that MUST be approved for use. We would see the display being approved by the FDA before launch if it is coming to the US. If it isnt approved (correct DPI/PPI, dimensions, white balance, and color depiction) it cannot be legally used.
    Seriously doubt that's an issue. Most MRI/CT scans are already optimized to be displayed and utilized on screens much lower resolution than is available on most (if not all) smartphones available today. The common display technologies in everyday mobile devices are much more advanced that the minimum required in the medical fields. I won't profess to be an expert by any means, but one of my primary responsibilities is providing medical documents to state/county level analysts to review and approve disability claims. My most boring days are spent scanning hardcopy documents, and forwarding digital documents... snoozefest days.... zzzzzzz....
    04-16-14 09:49 PM
  5. igor10000's Avatar
    Pretty sure that 2015 will be too late....

    But then again, if they sell the patents, they should buy them another year.
    What?

    Posted via CB10
    04-16-14 10:06 PM
  6. igor10000's Avatar
    Wow a phone that is almost custom made for me! Can't wait!
    Me too

    Posted via CB10
    04-16-14 10:12 PM
  7. igor10000's Avatar
    It makes no sense at all that Windermere would be what they are developing with NantHealth.
    In fact, Windermere has been mentioned for a long time already, and also the news release by BlackBerry also clearly says they aren't sure how everything is going to pan out yet. So I would put this all at a very early stage of development
    We don't know how long has the NantHealth deal been in the works by now.

    Posted via CB10
    04-16-14 10:18 PM
  8. The Big Picture's Avatar
    Toys? Funny, most senior executives and professionals I know grew out of their Blackberries into (mostly) iPhones and (some) Samsungs over the past 3 or so years and the drop in BB's marketshare underscores that migration (unless you want to pretend that all of that drop is by high school and university students who used to love their BB prosumer device).

    The only ones that seem to be hanging on to their Blackberries work for government.
    I sure got your attention didnt i? So you are talking about growing into tech and if iphones and androids are toys?

    Im not disillusioned to the fact that BlackBerry has lost marketshare. Thats blatantly obvious but thats not what we're talking about.

    If you read in context you would see that we were talking about how BlackBerry was once the professional choice, businessmen, wallstreet types and to a large extent still is because of its security.

    Most of your senior executives and professionals are human and are not immune to whats cool and trendy out there which is what apple is all about.

    Essentially apple, android and BlackBerry are smartphones and they basically do the same thing so what makes a smartphone a toy?

    So we are talking about 3 different smartphones. Lets call it device A, B, C. All of them have email, communication and web-browsing capability, but:

    A and B have many apps for entertainment like instagram, candy crush, snapchat and various games to give them hours of fun time. They can keep their kids and themselves entertained for hours on the commute or whatever and talk to their friends.

    A started its life as an music player and then decided to become a phone and have absolutely no footing or experience in catering for the business or enterprise markets, also recently a german chancellor using this device got hacked, while the other device B is an open platform designed to rooted, customised by anyone who wants to and has over 80 percent of the mobile world's malware.

    The last device C, ensures security and productivity and used as you say by governments.

    Which is the toy and which is the tool?

    Your senior executives and professionals are using toys and the statement is completely correct. But it doesnt mean there's anything wrong with using a toy. I have many toys.

    My statement about hipsters and students, it is a known fact that all the younger people of this world is more concerned about image, cool factor, the latest tech, validity amongst peers all of which BlackBerry doesn't provide but apple and android does. Case in point do you know many teens who want a BlackBerry? But eventually they will have to grow up and get jobs like the rest of us and maybe work in an industry of which security is extremely important. Thus my statement.

    But I wouldn't use a toy if I was a working in the government, bank, consultant, oil and gas or any company/agency that holds and communicates highly sensitive information/data. That would just be plain stupid. But it also depends on what your job scope is. If you are a professional in HR or marketing then no one is gonna bother hacking you.

    Back when BlackBerry was big there wasnt many other valid choices in the smartphone market. Now there is. Not everyone will let go of their toys and most of them dont need to, but there's something there for BlackBerry if only the market realises the importance of security.

    Anyway to get back on topic, healthcare professionals using BlackBerry is a great thing and reinforces that they are not toys.

    Q10SQN100-3/10.2.1.2228, Z30, Z10, iP5, SGS3
    Last edited by Q10Nutter; 04-17-14 at 11:05 AM.
    04-16-14 10:33 PM
  9. nabil114's Avatar
    I have a story to share. I was in the emergency room. I saw the doctor whip out the iPhone to look at possible medication he can give me. John Chen is being like Mike as applications are not important in mobile!
    04-16-14 10:43 PM
  10. The Big Picture's Avatar
    I have a story to share. I was in the emergency room. I saw the doctor whip out the iPhone to look at possible medication he can give me. John Chen is being like Mike as applications are not important in mobile!
    Was he a general practitioner or a surgeon/ radiologist/diagnosis?

    I think this device is for doctors who look at scans and need them to be accurate.


    Q10SQN100-3/10.2.1.2228, Z30, Z10, iP5, SGS3
    04-16-14 10:53 PM
  11. sxchan's Avatar
    yeah I read about this on N4BB.

    Hope they can release it soon and then get the healthcare to get their hands on the phones.
    04-16-14 11:18 PM
  12. imcurved's Avatar
    Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder. It looks ugly to some but looks sexy to me. It's different. I'm sure using it will be a different experience from all touch or qwerty devices so far and I'd like to have that experience.

    ? CB10 ?
    04-16-14 11:36 PM
  13. LibertyPhone's Avatar
    Medical devices require VERY specific display technologies that MUST be approved for use. We would see the display being approved by the FDA before launch if it is coming to the US. If it isnt approved (correct DPI/PPI, dimensions, white balance, and color depiction) it cannot be legally used.
    Screw FDA, this is a free market.

    Posted via CB10
    04-16-14 11:39 PM
  14. LibertyPhone's Avatar
    Was he a general practitioner or a surgeon/ radiologist/diagnosis?

    I think this device is for doctors who look at scans and need them to be accurate.


    Q10SQN100-3/10.2.1.2228, Z30, Z10, iP5, SGS3
    I believe device is also for patients too.

    Posted via CB10
    04-16-14 11:41 PM
  15. The Big Picture's Avatar
    I believe device is also for patients too.

    Posted via CB10
    I think this device is based on the Q30 just like how the new porsche design is based on the Z10.

    Difference is that this one is exclusive to the healthcare industry meaning its not available to the public.

    The public version is the Q30.

    Q10SQN100-3/10.2.1.2228, Z30, Z10, iP5, SGS3
    04-17-14 12:13 AM
  16. 00stryder's Avatar
    Was he a general practitioner or a surgeon/ radiologist/diagnosis?

    I think this device is for doctors who look at scans and need them to be accurate.


    Q10SQN100-3/10.2.1.2228, Z30, Z10, iP5, SGS3
    It's irrelevant what type of physician it was, I'll just state from my experience in the hospital that the app that doctor was using on his iPhone was likely something like Epocrates; he likely knew which medication he wanted to provide (Epocrates doesn't tell you how to treat anything, just details about meds that you may use) and was looking up specific dosing standards for the other poster's body weight. I can't know for sure, but the point I'm making is that the apps available in the App Store are hugely beneficial for providing quick reference to health care providers. In fact, the most number of trusted medical apps are built for iOS, and many health care systems are signing onto having unique apps built for their hospitals and clinics.

    The reason I'm saying all of this is that the device's screen won't be enough to win the industry over. As much as we hate it, Apple has convinced nearly all smartphone users that you need an app to do things. I think Chen and Co. will likely utilize a two-prong approach where there is specific software built to provide a better experience to physicians to compliment the optimal screen size/resolution for viewing medical imaging.

    Whether they succeed is the real question as it's going to be nothing but an uphill battle.

    Posted via CB10
    04-17-14 12:28 AM
  17. milo53's Avatar
    BlackBerry and NantHealth plan to develop a smartphone (aka Windermere) for the healthcare industry that's optimized for viewing 3D images and CT scans.

    It's expected to arrive in late 2014 or early 2015.

    I'm in that biz, long story, but one cannot use tablets or phones for diagnostic purposes.

    Posted via CB10
    04-17-14 01:36 AM
  18. NYC10065's Avatar
    I sure got your attention didnt i? So you are talking about growing into tech and if iphones and androids are toys?

    Im not disillusioned to the fact that BlackBerry has lost marketshare. Thats blatantly obvious but thats not what we're talking about.

    If you read in context you would see that we were talking about how BlackBerry was once the professional choice, businessmen, wallstreet types and to a large extent still is because of its security.

    Most of your senior executives and professionals are human and are not immune to whats cool and trendy out there which is what apple is all about.

    Essentially apple, android and BlackBerry are smartphones and they basically do the same thing so what makes a smartphone a toy?

    So we are talking about 3 different smartphones. Lets call it device A, B, C. All of them have email, communication and web-browsing capability, but:

    A and B have many apps for entertainment like instagram, candy crush, snapchat and various games to give them hours of fun time. They cant keep their kids and themselves entertained for hours on the commute or whatever and talk to their friends.

    A started its life as an music player and then decided to become a phone and have absolutely no footing or experience in catering for the business or enterprise markets, also recently a german chancellor using this device got hacked, while the other device B is an open platform designed to rooted, customised by anyone who wants to and has over 80 percent of the mobile world's malware.

    The last device C, ensures security and productivity and used as you say by governments.

    Which is the toy and which is the tool?

    Your senior executives and professionals are using toys and the statement is completely correct. But it doesnt mean there's anything wrong with using a toy. I have many toys.

    My statement about hipsters and students, it is a known fact that all the younger people of this world is more concerned about image, cool factor, the latest tech, validity amongst peers all of which BlackBerry doesn't provide but apple and android does. Case in point do you know many teens who want a BlackBerry? But eventually they will have to grow up and get jobs like the rest of us and maybe work in an industry of which security is extremely important. Thus my statement.

    But I wouldn't use a toy if I was a working in the government, bank, consultant, oil and gas or any company/agency that holds and communicates highly sensitive information/data. That would just be plain stupid. But it also depends on what your job scope is. If you are a professional in HR or marketing then no one is gonna bother hacking you.

    Back when BlackBerry was big there wasnt many other valid choices in the smartphone market. Now there is. Not everyone will let go of their toys and most of them dont need to, but there's something there for BlackBerry if only the market realises the importance of security.

    Anyway to get back on topic, healthcare professionals using BlackBerry is a great thing and reinforces that they are not toys.

    Q10SQN100-3/10.2.1.2228, Z30, Z10, iP5, SGS3
    You should really at least own up to your original intent. Sure, there is nothing wrong with having toys but calling an iPhone or Android device a "toy" isn't as nuanced as you've tried to make it out in this last post, is it?

    The real intention in your original post in stating that "hipsters, teenagers and college/university students need to get a job and grow out of their toys" was to somehow insult iPhone and Android devices as being "toys" rather than smartphones or legitimate mobile computing devices. By equating them with "hipsters, teenagers and college/university students" who don't yet have a job and aren't yet grown up, you were really trying to trivialize them in comparison to your beloved Blackberry which you seem to think is somehow different, better and just plain "more" than the so-called "toys".

    Furthermore, BB fanboys all over this site have taken to calling iPhones and Android devices "toys" as an insult both to the devices and the users. That's not only tiresome and insulting, it is also wholly inaccurate.

    You should at least own up to what you were trying to do in your original post. My point, again, is to simply point out that using you very own statement, you could quite easily conclude that all those millions "prosumers" (I really hate that word, btw) that used to use BB devices 3-4 years ago that have switched to iPhone/Android "grew out of" BB and into what they perceive to be more effective devices.
    daveycrocket likes this.
    04-17-14 01:40 AM
  19. Elvis Salvador's Avatar

    The reason I'm saying all of this is that the device's screen won't be enough to win the industry over.


    Posted via CB10
    How do you know this? Do you actually work in the healthcard industry??

    Posted via CB10
    04-17-14 02:00 AM
  20. 00stryder's Avatar
    How do you know this? Do you actually work in the healthcard industry??

    Posted via CB10
    Graduating medical student about to start my residency training in two months so, yep.

    Posted via CB10
    shupor likes this.
    04-17-14 04:04 AM
  21. Elvis Salvador's Avatar
    Graduating medical student about to start my residency training in two months so, yep.

    Posted via CB10
    That's awesome sryder congrats but no offense but you've never worked in the health-care industry so technically you are under-qualified to speak on this subject.

    Posted via CB10
    04-17-14 05:33 AM
  22. tomkranz's Avatar
    I have designed and implemented large scale PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication Systems) for health trusts here in the UK. They had to be built to store and retrieve terabytes of medical imaging data per day, from multiple hospitals. I not only architected the back-end for all of this, but also designed and worked with technologies to retrieve these images and display them for diagnostic and consulting purposes.
    As part of that I got to spend a lot of time with radiologists, PACS workstations, and the entire regulatory framework around that.
    For *diagnosis*, the display used must be manufactured to very specific controls, must be regularly calibrated, and has much much higher defect tolerances than consumer displays.
    A 21" diagnostic LCD will set you back around 5-6k.
    A full-slice CT scan can be over 50GB is size. The diagnostic workstation has to retrieve and manipulate these images in real-time.
    MRI scans are smaller, x-rays are smaller still. For diagnosis, though, all must have regulatory approved displays.
    For consultation, you can down-scale the images and display them on any old device - I was working on render farms using GPUs to provide real time scaling to stream to web browsers, but there are other methods as well.
    Consultation is where the diagnosis has been made, and you're sharing the data/context with the patient or other medical staff - like your GP.
    If BlackBerry can get these units approved for diagnosis they will rule the market. This space has been crying out for a mobile solution, and although I doubt it could handle CT scans, MRIs or x-rays would be very do-able.
    If it's a consultation device, then it won't need approval, and it will live or die by it's apps - which is where I'd assume Nanthealth bring some value to the table.
    Please note I have no idea what BlackBerry are actually planning in this space, just shedding some light on the very niche requirements and rules.
    Cheers,
    TOM

    Posted via CB10
    04-17-14 09:14 AM
  23. Elvis Salvador's Avatar
    Bro do you even html?

    Posted via CB10
    weiberry likes this.
    04-17-14 09:53 AM
  24. Sith_Apprentice's Avatar
    Screw FDA, this is a free market.

    Posted via CB10
    Not for medical equipment it is not...It MUST be certified.
    04-17-14 10:02 AM
  25. Sith_Apprentice's Avatar
    Seriously doubt that's an issue. Most MRI/CT scans are already optimized to be displayed and utilized on screens much lower resolution than is available on most (if not all) smartphones available today. The common display technologies in everyday mobile devices are much more advanced that the minimum required in the medical fields. I won't profess to be an expert by any means, but one of my primary responsibilities is providing medical documents to state/county level analysts to review and approve disability claims. My most boring days are spent scanning hardcopy documents, and forwarding digital documents... snoozefest days.... zzzzzzz....
    This is nothing to do with medical imaging though... As was stated earlier, medical imaging is an entirely different beast. It is VERY specific and VERY regulated. Heck, for documents any smartphone would work (and I have run environments where it was used for medical records, just not imaging).
    04-17-14 10:04 AM
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