05-12-10 01:40 PM
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  1. belfastdispatcher's Avatar
    All other mobile platforms support IMAP as a protocol, so their delivery is just as fast. Bottom line, BIS/IMAP is the only "instant" Push RIM has for the consumer and that's already supported by other platforms and I don't think the platforms limit the count to 10 because the account setups are on the devices themselves as apposed to on BIS for RIM.

    So, again, that's not really that big of an issue if at all, since most platforms support IMAP instant Push. The big support issues is multiple Enterprise email account support on RIM's end, not the other platforms since almost all support multiple Enterprise email accounts with INSTANT Push.... something RIM doesn't do.
    Do really other platforms do push imap email? I didn't know that. Before blackberry I had a Nokia E61 and when set up trough imap it could only pull every 5 minutes, no push. Trough pop it could only pull every 30 minutes.
    Maybe things have changed but I wasn't aware of push imap email from other platforms without exchange.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    05-10-10 12:29 PM
  2. JRSCCivic98's Avatar
    Do really other platforms do push imap email? I didn't know that. Before blackberry I had a Nokia E61 and when set up trough imap it could only pull every 5 minutes, no push. Trough pop it could only pull every 30 minutes.
    Maybe things have changed but I wasn't aware of push imap email from other platforms without exchange.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Nokia has supported IMAP4 for a long time, but it did not support IMAP IDLE, which is how Push IMAP works (i.e. instant delivery). The newer platforms have this support because this is how GMail, Yahoo, Hotmail, etc. all work with RIM's Push technology... i.e. IMAP IDLE protocol support.
    05-10-10 12:39 PM
  3. belfastdispatcher's Avatar
    Lol, we've kinda hijacked this thread but there you go, learn something new every day. However, it's not enough to make me jump ship. To me, the blackberry is not a substitute to a laptop therefore I don't expect to do everything on it. If an email is truncated I just pull the laptop out. Plus I love the ease of use of the blackberry OS and all the shortcuts.

    So in theory the imap idle is fast, what's it like in practice tho, anybody any experience with this on a nokia?

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    05-10-10 01:05 PM
  4. belfastdispatcher's Avatar
    Wow, dude, just had a look at this imap idle stuff, not to pick faults at it but genuinely interested, and I can't believe you are comparing it with push email.

    For a start it needs a constant internet connection, do that on 3G and you can watch your battery drop lines. How would that even work on gprs/edge, does it mean you'll never get a phone call trough?

    That is definitely not an alternative to blackberry push email.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    05-11-10 03:29 AM
  5. JRSCCivic98's Avatar
    Wow, dude, just had a look at this imap idle stuff, not to pick faults at it but genuinely interested, and I can't believe you are comparing it with push email.

    For a start it needs a constant internet connection, do that on 3G and you can watch your battery drop lines. How would that even work on gprs/edge, does it mean you'll never get a phone call trough?

    That is definitely not an alternative to blackberry push email.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    You don't understand how even BB works. IMAP is the same way BIS works when polling your GMail account. Why do you think it's not instant unless you have IMAP enabled on your GMail account?

    Anyway, that's beside the point and whatever you read doesn't directly relate to how it works on a mobile platform. All you need to know is that BB is NOT the only one with push email technology. But we've hijacked this thread enough. Go read up on a few other threads that depict how push email works on other platforms. The whole battery life aspect of it is frankly pushed a bit too far if you ask me. It's not as big a problem as synth makes it out to be.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    05-11-10 11:15 AM
  6. belfastdispatcher's Avatar
    You don't understand how even BB works. IMAP is the same way BIS works when polling your GMail account. Why do you think it's not instant unless you have IMAP enabled on your GMail account?

    Anyway, that's beside the point and whatever you read doesn't directly relate to how it works on a mobile platform. All you need to know is that BB is NOT the only one with push email technology. But we've hijacked this thread enough. Go read up on a few other threads that depict how push email works on other platforms. The whole battery life aspect of it is frankly pushed a bit too far if you ask me. It's not as big a problem as synth makes it out to be.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    I know, one last thing tho as it's still not clear and I would like to find out once and for all.
    Is the difference with BB not that the NOC is doing all the work keeping the imap connection on and only connecting
    to the device when a new email arrives?
    I distinctly remember my nokia E61 having an option for the internet connection to be on when needed or on all the time. When selecting the permanent on conection the battery would drop buy more then half without actually using it.
    Please clarify for us as you seem to know what you're talking about.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    05-11-10 12:43 PM
  7. JRSCCivic98's Avatar
    I know, one last thing tho as it's still not clear and I would like to find out once and for all.
    Is the difference with BB not that the NOC is doing all the work keeping the imap connection on and only connecting
    to the device when a new email arrives?
    I distinctly remember my nokia E61 having an option for the internet connection to be on when needed or on all the time. When selecting the permanent on conection the battery would drop buy more then half without actually using it.
    Please clarify for us as you seem to know what you're talking about.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Very true, older smartphones (as they were called) used to do it this way. And in today's time, it's still done the same way, but radio power mangement has been made better so keeping a live data connection now isn't as power consuming as it was back in the day. Also, even a BB keeps a constant data connection on, it's just that the polling is done by the BIS servers as apposed to the local device. There's pluses and minuses to both ways, but the bottom line is, with today's technology, the heartbeat intervals needed for some of these protocols to work can be broadcase very quickly and without a lot of battery power being used up. Hardware and software manufacturers have made pretty good advancements in being able to minimize battery usage while completing the same tasks of years past.

    I know it's not the detailed tech answer you want, but that would take too long. For now, try to generalize it via the following analogy... think of toilets from years past flushing and wasting a lot of water. Today's toilet technology has changed to use less water, but accomplish the same task... same thing here, just different application.
    05-11-10 11:55 PM
  8. sivan's Avatar
    Very true, older smartphones (as they were called) used to do it this way. And in today's time, it's still done the same way, but radio power mangement has been made better so keeping a live data connection now isn't as power consuming as it was back in the day. Also, even a BB keeps a constant data connection on, it's just that the polling is done by the BIS servers as apposed to the local device. There's pluses and minuses to both ways, but the bottom line is, with today's technology, the heartbeat intervals needed for some of these protocols to work can be broadcase very quickly and without a lot of battery power being used up. Hardware and software manufacturers have made pretty good advancements in being able to minimize battery usage while completing the same tasks of years past.
    If it's not important, why did Apple go through the trouble of push notifications, when they could just let apps poll instead?
    05-12-10 01:49 AM
  9. phonejunky's Avatar
    For better battery life for all of its other apps, you know those ones the Blackberry doesn't have, or that look like straight poo on its stale UI, just cause it isn't that battery consuming anymore doesn't mean not to use better ways to make your device better.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    05-12-10 08:51 AM
  10. sivan's Avatar
    Still would like an answer from Civic on why other companies have apparently seen the light on push services.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    05-12-10 01:40 PM
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