1. GadgetGuru72's Avatar
    I know a lot of people love Viigo, but I just don't understand why. In all the threads I've seen where people ask for the best RSS reader, people respond with comments like "definitely Viigo!!" or "Viigo, hands down!!!!" Typically, in such responses, there is absolutely no reasoning given. Instead, people act as if the number of exclamation points is reason enough. [Wow, that person said Viigo was the best and used 10 exclamation points ... it must be good].

    I am currently using Newsgator Go. There are some aspects of that program that I don't like, but it has one feature that I cannot do without ... sync'ing between desktop and BB. If I'm at home I can use Newsgator Online to read my RSS feeds. Then, when I'm out, I can launch Newsgator Go and it will only show me the feeds that I have NOT yet read. The opposite holds true as well.

    With Viigo, on the other hand, nothing syncs. So, I can read practically every feed on my computer and, when I'm out, Viigo will show me all the stuff that I've already read. I then have to go through and manually find new stuff. That's quite a pain if you have a lot of feeds.

    Also, with Newsgator Go, I can organize my feeds into folders. So, for example, I can have all my BlackBerry-related feeds in a single folder.

    Those features are what cause me to use Newsgator Go over Viigo.

    Yet, I rarely if ever see people recommending anything other than Viigo. I don't understand what is so special about Viigo. If Viigo really is the best, I'd like to use it. However, I just don't understand why so many people love it.

    So, please let me know what makes Viigo so special.

    Thanks in advance.

    [Edit: I know that Viigo now has a CrackBerry.com-branded version. Very cool but, standing alone, is not enough reason for me to switch.]
    03-03-08 12:15 PM
  2. cjcarbone's Avatar
    I like Viigo better for two reasons only.

    Some of my local feeds are very slow, and sometimes not even updated on Newsgator.
    Newsgator is a very nice program as well, and i wish Viigo would sync PC-BB read, that would be great..

    Newsgator is very "busy" for me, it seems cluttered, i still use it on my PC, just not liking it on my BB too much.
    Last edited by cjcarbone; 03-03-08 at 12:51 PM.
    03-03-08 12:33 PM
  3. MrBigFeathers#CB's Avatar
    I agree. I had Viigo installed for about 5 minutes. It came off when I found out it didn't sync. So for now I just go to google reader mobile in my browser to sync with google reader on the PC. I would love a better solution. I may have to check newsgator out.
    03-03-08 03:39 PM
  4. vinmontRD's Avatar
    GadgetGuru - good questions. I tend to be a sucker for new software - as long as it's useful and usable. After having been working in and around software for more than 20 years, I'm acutely sensitive to certain usability considerations - and I have no patience at all for software designs that seem to say to me that the designers, architects or developers just "don't get it". Sometimes a "pretty face" (user interface in the case of software) might catch my eye, but if true usability considerations aren't addressed, I lose interest quickly.

    Here's an example: When Yahoo! Go first came out for the Blackberry, I downloaded it and gave it a try. The animated user interface was one of the more impressive designs I had seen to date on a Blackberry, and I *wanted* to like the program. After trying it several times, I realized that there were some fundamental flaws in the design. A key one, in this case, was that I could not pick and choose which of the included "applets" I wanted, and which I could live without - so even though I didn't want them, I had to suffer through the overhead of having sports stories, hollywood articles and flickr pages uploading any time I tried to use Yahoo! Go. That was really annoying, but I still kept it around so I could share it periodically with colleagues when I wanted to discuss UI design for mobile devices. But then Yahoo released a new version -- and the it went downhill dramatically. The new UI is dreadful: it's cluttered, inconsistent and navigation is simply awful, and it STILL gives me no choice about the included content. I finally gave up and removed it from my Blackberry.

    OK - back to Viigo, Newsgator Go, Google reader, Freerange and RSS in general...

    First - RSS is a great concept, but in my experience, the tools I use on my PC are not necessarily the same tools I use on my mobile device - and this is for reasons that I find very compelling. RSS has been available for quite a while via the PC, but aside from an occasional experiment, I really have little or no interest in RSS on the desktop. Firefox lets me organize favorites pretty much any way I like, as well as nesting folders on my links toolbar. Google's News page makes it trivial for me to aggregate articles on virtually any topic I like in real time, and I've devoted hundreds of hours becoming proficient with search engines to grab info on virtually any topic that interests me in just a few seconds - on the desktop. Although I can create custom RSS feeds on the PC, and peek at them any time I like, I personally find that approach really cumbersome on the desktop, and it doesn't interest me at all when there are so many options that are better suited to a desktop experience.

    On a mobile device, such as my Blackberry Curve, it's a totally different story, for a few key reasons.

    Whereas my desktop PC enjoys a 12 Mbps download speed via Comcast, I'm currently using an EDGE connection via T-Mobile to my Curve. Whereas I generally have a pair of flat screen monitors side-by-side on my desk, with 2560 x 1024 pixels of desktop real estate in which to organize browser windows, my Curve's screen is quite a bit smaller! The net result of this is that it doesn't make sense to approach news gathering, perusal and reading the same way on the Blackberry that I do on my pc - it just wouldn't work.

    To make the experience on the Blackberry (or any small mobile device with limited bandwidth) positive, the product design has to confront the format limitations head on, and that's where Viigo shines.

    First and foremost - the UI on a mobile device is, of necessity, small. I do NOT want to have to navigate through layers of nested folders to find my way around. Instead, I want to be able to look at the front screen, perhaps scroll up and down a bit, and immediately see what there is that interests me. I might get used to one layer of nested folder if Viigo were to offer it, but for the moment, I'm doing just fine by selecting those feeds that already aggregate content in a way that pretty much accomplishes the same thing for me. For example, I have a number of feeds defined that pull directly from subforums on another fine Blackberry discussion site. As soon as I open Viigo, I can see that there are 20 unread posts about the 8300 Curve, 4 that I haven't yet read about the BB OS. I can see 40 unread article headers for Engadget Mobile, and 50 in Yahoo! News Top Stories. For me, THIS is a very useful level of aggregation and organization. Folders in Newsgator are appealing at first, but in the end, they are more cumbersome than truly useful.

    A truly HUGE differentiator for me is the fact that Viigo is updating itself in the background all the time, anywhere from every 30 minutes to once a day depending on my preferences. I can count on the fact that when I open Viigo, it is up to date, since I personally have it set to update twice an hour. This is invaluable, as I do NOT have to wait for headers to download the way I had to with Newsgator when I open a feed.

    That one difference alone was enough to put me off Newsgator completely. When I am using a mobile device, I generally count on having immediate access to content. A good analogy here is the comparison between a tool like BB Weather and using a web browser to pull up a weather report. BB Weather, like Viigo, will pull down information around the clock, as a background task. When I open it up, my weather report is THERE, and it is current - requiring no wait on my part. In order to use a web-based report, I would have to watch a web browser initialize and then wait for a web page to be displayed after I navigate to it -- this is unacceptable when a cached option like BB Weather is available.

    Similarly, having grown accustomed to Viigo's background refresh and content caching, I find anything less in a newsreader to be totally unacceptable, clutzy and amateurish. The difference really makes Viigo feel "professional" to the other products' "shareware feel". Shareware developers often provide cute, clever or impressive features -- but what prevents so many of them from going commercial is that they simply "don't get" what differentiates "clever" from truly useful and usable. The folks putting out Viigo clearly DO understand that difference - they "get it".

    Newsgator Go and Freerange were both free, and I had to give them a try. I wanted to really like them. But, in the end, they went the way of Yahoo! Go for me. Cute, substantial, but truly far less useful for me than a tool like Viigo which shows a true understanding of what makes mobile software useful and usable.

    Viigo is so convenient, between it's layout, navigability and cached live content, that I am able to check on the news throughout the day, any time I have a few minutes to peek at my blackberry. Today, I did this while riding the elevator in my office building, while waiting for a ringing phone to be answered, and later in the evening while standing in a pizzeria, waiting for my pies to come out of the oven. With something like Newsgator, I would have been standing there waiting for content to download. In these brief interludes, I was able to READ several articles in Viigo - while in the other products, I never would have had the chance.

    For me, Viigo makes RSS worthwhile and extremely usable, whereas I have never had any use for it otherwise. Viigo is also another compelling reason for me to carry a mobile data device all day - it makes the mobile experience better. The competing products just don't seem to make that difference for me, and they, like Yahoo! Go, are no longer on my Blackberry.

    - Jon

    Last edited by vinmontRD; 03-07-08 at 06:14 AM.
    03-06-08 10:55 PM
  5. GadgetGuru72's Avatar
    GadgetGuru - good questions. I tend to be a sucker for new software - as long as it's useful and usable. After having been working in and around software for more than 20 years, I'm acutely sensitive to certain usability considerations - and I have no patience at all for software designs that seem to say to me that the designers, architects or developers just "don't get it". Sometimes a "pretty face" (user interface in the case of software) might catch my eye, but if true usability considerations aren't addressed, I lose interest quickly.

    Here's an example: When Yahoo! Go first came out for the Blackberry, I downloaded it and gave it a try. The animated user interface was one of the more impressive designs I had seen to date on a Blackberry, and I *wanted* to like the program. After trying it several times, I realized that there were some fundamental flaws in the design. A key one, in this case, was that I could not pick and choose which of the included "applets" I wanted, and which I could live without - so even though I didn't want them, I had to suffer through the overhead of having sports stories, hollywood articles and flickr pages uploading any time I tried to use Yahoo! Go. That was really annoying, but I still kept it around so I could share it periodically with colleagues when I wanted to discuss UI design for mobile devices. But then Yahoo released a new version -- and the it went downhill dramatically. The new UI is dreadful: it's cluttered, inconsistent and navigation is simply awful, and it STILL gives me no choice about the included content. I finally gave up and removed it from my Blackberry.

    OK - back to Viigo, Newsgator Go, Google reader, Freerange and RSS in general...

    First - RSS is a great concept, but in my experience, the tools I use on my PC are not necessarily the same tools I use on my mobile device - and this is for reasons that I find very compelling. RSS has been available for quite a while via the PC, but aside from an occasional experiment, I really have little or no interest in RSS on the desktop. Firefox lets me organize favorites pretty much any way I like, as well as nesting folders on my links toolbar. Google's News page makes it trivial for me to aggregate articles on virtually any topic I like in real time, and I've devoted hundreds of hours becoming proficient with search engines to grab info on virtually any topic that interests me in just a few seconds - on the desktop. Although I can create custom RSS feeds on the PC, and peek at them any time I like, I personally find that approach really cumbersome on the desktop, and it doesn't interest me at all when there are so many options that are better suited to a desktop experience.

    On a mobile device, such as my Blackberry Curve, it's a totally different story, for a few key reasons.

    Whereas my desktop PC enjoys a 12 Mbps download speed via Comcast, I'm currently using an EDGE connection via T-Mobile to my Curve. Whereas I generally have a pair of flat screen monitors side-by-side on my desk, with 2560 x 1024 pixels of desktop real estate in which to organize browser windows, my Curve's screen is quite a bit smaller! The net result of this is that it doesn't make sense to approach news gathering, perusal and reading the same way on the Blackberry that I do on my pc - it just wouldn't work.

    To make the experience on the Blackberry (or any small mobile device with limited bandwidth) positive, the product design has to confront the format limitations head on, and that's where Viigo shines.

    First and foremost - the UI on a mobile device is, of necessity, small. I do NOT want to have to navigate through layers of nested folders to find my way around. Instead, I want to be able to look at the front screen, perhaps scroll up and down a bit, and immediately see what there is that interests me. I might get used to one layer of nested folder if Viigo were to offer it, but for the moment, I'm doing just fine by selecting those feeds that already aggregate content in a way that pretty much accomplishes the same thing for me. For example, I have a number of feeds defined that pull directly from subforums on another fine Blackberry discussion site. As soon as I open Viigo, I can see that there are 20 unread posts about the 8300 Curve, 4 that I haven't yet read about the BB OS. I can see 40 unread article headers for Engadget Mobile, and 50 in Yahoo! News Top Stories. For me, THIS is a very useful level of aggregation and organization. Folders in Newsgator are appealing at first, but in the end, they are more cumbersome than truly useful.

    A truly HUGE differentiator for me is the fact that Viigo is updating itself in the background all the time, anywhere from every 30 minutes to once a day depending on my preferences. I can count on the fact that when I open Viigo, it is up to date, since I personally have it set to update twice an hour. This is invaluable, as I do NOT have to wait for headers to download the way I had to with Newsgator when I open a feed.

    That one difference alone was enough to put me off Newsgator completely. When I am using a mobile device, I generally count on having immediate access to content. A good analogy here is the comparison between a tool like BB Weather and using a web browser to pull up a weather report. BB Weather, like Viigo, will pull down information around the clock, as a background task. When I open it up, my weather report is THERE, and it is current - requiring no wait on my part. In order to use a web-based report, I would have to watch a web browser initialize and then wait for a web page to be displayed after I navigate to it -- this is unacceptable when a cached option like BB Weather is available.

    Similarly, having grown accustomed to Viigo's background refresh and content caching, I find anything less in a newsreader to be totally unacceptable, clutzy and amateurish. The difference really makes Viigo feel "professional" to the other products' "shareware feel". Shareware developers often provide cute, clever or impressive features -- but what prevents so many of them from going commercial is that they simply "don't get" what differentiates "clever" from truly useful and usable. The folks putting out Viigo clearly DO understand that difference - they "get it".

    Newsgator Go and Freerange were both free, and I had to give them a try. I wanted to really like them. But, in the end, they went the way of Yahoo! Go for me. Cute, substantial, but truly far less useful for me than a tool like Viigo which shows a true understanding of what makes mobile software useful and usable.

    Viigo is so convenient, between it's layout, navigability and cached live content, that I am able to check on the news throughout the day, any time I have a few minutes to peek at my blackberry. Today, I did this while riding the elevator in my office building, while waiting for a ringing phone to be answered, and later in the evening while standing in a pizzeria, waiting for my pies to come out of the oven. With something like Newsgator, I would have been standing there waiting for content to download. In these brief interludes, I was able to READ several articles in Viigo - while in the other products, I never would have had the chance.

    For me, Viigo makes RSS worthwhile and extremely usable, whereas I have never had any use for it otherwise. Viigo is also another compelling reason for me to carry a mobile data device all day - it makes the mobile experience better. The competing products just don't seem to make that difference for me, and they, like Yahoo! Go, are no longer on my Blackberry.

    - Jon

    Wow! Thanks for the incredible thorough response. After carefully reading through it and considering all your points, I think your reasoning contains one critical flaw. I'll get back to that in a second.

    You stated that you do not use an RSS reader on your PC, because Firefox and Google's News page make it easy for you to quickly get to the information you want. I follow about 30-35 different sites that offer RSS feeds. Although Firefox and Google do make browsing easier and quicker, I do not think anyone could keep track of 30-35 different sites using Firefox and Google as quickly as they could using an RSS reader. Let's say that we both have 30-35 sites we read. In the morning, I peruse all 30-35 sites using Newsgator Online, and you read the same sites using Firefox and Google. Later than afternoon we are both curious to know if there have been any new stories added. Who do you think would finish first? For me, I simply go to Newsgator Online and click "refresh." Within seconds I know exactly which of the 30-35 sites have new stories to read. You, on the other hand, would have to visit Google News, bring up a bunch of different tabs in Firefox, and then quickly peruse each page to determine if there is anything new. Even giving an extremely conservative estimate of 5 seconds per site, that would still be between 2.5 - 3 minutes for you to make the same determination that I made in a matter of seconds.

    That brings me to what I deem to be a critical flaw in your reasoning. You conclude that Viigo is better because it is quicker. Essentially, you do not have to navigate through nested folders, and it pulls in new stories in the background so that the stories are ready to go immediately whenever you wish to read them.

    However, you are overlooking the fact that you then have to navigate your way around stories that you have already read.

    I will use the example you gave of Engadget Mobile. Let's say that one morning I visit Engadget using Newsgator Online and read all the current stories. At the same time, you go directly to Engadget.com and read all the same stories. Then, later that afternoon, we both want to use our BBs to find out if Engadget has any new stories. Here's a comparison:

    (1) Me -- I would have to launch Newsgator Go on my BB. At that point, you are correct that I would have to wait a few seconds while Newsgator Go downloaded my feeds. I would then have to navigate to my "Gadgets & Tech" folder, click that open, and then scroll down to Endadget Mobile in order to read new stories. Every story then appearing on my BB would be new and ready to read.

    (2) You -- With Viigo, you would have to launch Viigo on your BB. As you indicated, since Viigo pulls in stories every 30 minutes, you would not have to wait for Viigo to download feeds. However, you would still have to scroll down to your Engadget feed, and then peruse a long list of stories to determine which ones you read that morning and which ones are actually new. Since Engadget posts many stories every day, you may have to scroll past as many as 40+ stories before you reach anything new.

    Comparing those two scenarios, I don't see how Viigo would save any time at all. I may have to wait a few seconds to get new stories on Newsgator Go, but I know that every single story that pops up is new. You, on the other hand, have to navigate through screens and screens of previously read material.

    You focused a lot on how slow the navigation is on other mobile RSS readers because you have to navigate through folders, but you ignore the time it takes for the user to otherwise locate new stories. At best, it's a wash. At worst, Viigo is much slower.

    If "waiting" is the enemy, why do you conclude that waiting for Newsgator Go to download new stories is more of a waste of time than waiting to navigate your way through previously read material on Viigo? Is it just because the loss of time on Viigo is more active since you have to manually scroll through previously read material? It's still a loss of time regardless of how you look at it.
    03-07-08 10:32 AM
  6. Optimus_Prime's Avatar
    quoted from vinomtRD"
    ...... For example, I have a number of feeds defined that pull directly from subforums on another fine Blackberry discussion site. As soon as I open Viigo, I can see that there are 20 unread posts about the 8300 Curve, 4 that I haven't yet read about the BB OS. I can see 40 unread article headers for Engadget Mobile, and 50 in Yahoo! News Top Stories. "

    2 questions:
    1. How do you get the subforum, ( in my case: BB curve, Rumor, Social Users, Out of Topics)?
    I tried to copy the web address directly ( "http://forums.crackberry.com/f52/" on my Viigo acct, it said " added
    successfully " but still does not show up ( either on my Viigo acct and my BB) . The only things that show up still only the forums & blogs that come standard with the Crackberry Ed.


    2. When you said "Unread posts" does it mean unread on your BB only ( if I am not mistaken Viigo does not sync with your pc, correct)?

    Thanks
    03-07-08 11:05 AM
  7. vinmontRD's Avatar
    If "waiting" is the enemy, why do you conclude that waiting for Newsgator Go to download new stories is more of a waste of time than waiting to navigate your way through previously read material on Viigo? Is it just because the loss of time on Viigo is more active since you have to manually scroll through previously read material? It's still a loss of time regardless of how you look at it.
    I only have to navigate past "already read" articles if didn't review the whole list the first time. New articles pop in the top of each channel, pushing down older articles. If I keep up, I only have to open the channel and the newest articles are right at the top of the first page.

    No question that different people use tools in different ways. Perhaps, for you, the design trade-offs favor Newsgator. It's possible, also, that you track more articles per subscription than I do. I have Viigo set to keep 250 articles. The number of articles per subscription wind up ranging anywhere from 1 to 50. Just takes me a few seconds to scroll over the list. 250 seems to be a good number for me - I can comfortably skim the headers in each subscription in a few seconds, see what's new and read about it if I'm interested.

    Folders are a fine idea, as long as they're optional. But I really can't see myself monitoring several dozen news subscriptions simultaneously. For me, that would change the entire nature of my mobile experience. I'm using this as a way of staying "in touch" and up to date with interests around me - while I'm out and about at work or involved in other activities. If I were trying to monitor a hundred feeds and download 1,000 headers at a time, I might have a different perspective on tools - I really can't say. But that's not what I want from a tool like this. Again - our interests in this seem to be different: I want to use the tool that fits best with my intended use of it as an adjunct to all my other mobile activities, and not have it become a defining characteristic of my activities.

    I do recall *wanting* to like Newsgator, as I mentioned in the last post, just as I *wanted* to like Yahoo! Go. I have to admit that I don't remember all the details behind my disappointment in Newsgator, but I *do* recall that I found it irritating every time I tried to use it. Perhaps it was the key / functionality mapping, I really don't recall. But I do remember finding it increasingly annoying every time I tried to use it, and I have yet to face that at all with Viigo - for whatever reason.

    This is an interesting topic, and reminds me a bit of the iPhone vs Blackberry discussions. The iPhone is certainly elegant, the user interface has more "features" than the Blackberry does, and the browser is clearly superior to any browser on a Blackberry. But, after having used both, I would not consider an iPhone as replacement for my Curve. It is simply not as usable and functional, for my intended purposes, as the Blackberry.

    Re: RSS on the PC - we clearly use content in different ways. Perhaps if I wanted to monitor all articles in each of a few dozen publications, I would find a need for RSS on the PC. But that's not how I do it. With a page like Google, Google News or Yahoo, when I do a keyword search I see a myriad of sources that are discussing the topic of interest. That's generally far more effective for my own purposes.

    The obvious comment at this point would probably be, "but Jon, you don't do this with Viigo! You're contradicting yourself!" -- but my answer would be, "not quite". On the PC, when I want to see what the NY Times has to say, I go directly to their site; on the Blackberry, I go to that subscription. But many of the channels I have defined on Viigo are already topical. I have, for example, subscriptions to channels as specific as "8300 Curve", "BB Multimedia", "BB OS", "BB News", etc. As noted above, though, there are a few key subscriptions that are cross-topical, such as Wall Street Journal or Yahoo News, and seeing the top 50 most recent articles on each of these is perfect for me.

    Another consideration - I don't know about your data connection, but mine is variable depending on my location. For the most part, I am connected with a good EDGE connection. But sometimes I have GPRS only, and sometimes I have nothing. With Viigo constantly "trying" in the background, I *always* have content whenever I open it - even if I'm in a dead zone. Admittedly, I would still have to wait for a data connection again in order to retrieve a *full* article. But with Newsgator, I wouldn't even be able to see headers at all if I opened it up in a no-signal area.

    Anyway - I certainly wouldn't want to talk you out of something you enjoy and that works for you. I, personally, found it very irritiating to use Newgator, and I have consistently found that Viigo is a far more natural extension of my mobile experience, and far more enjoyable. Your experience may certainly be different, but after quite a bit of experimentation, Viigo consistently comes out as my favorite.
    03-07-08 12:24 PM
  8. GadgetGuru72's Avatar
    Another consideration - I don't know about your data connection, but mine is variable depending on my location. For the most part, I am connected with a good EDGE connection. But sometimes I have GPRS only, and sometimes I have nothing. With Viigo constantly "trying" in the background, I *always* have content whenever I open it - even if I'm in a dead zone. Admittedly, I would still have to wait for a data connection again in order to retrieve a *full* article. But with Newsgator, I wouldn't even be able to see headers at all if I opened it up in a no-signal area.
    Now THAT is a great point! In that respect, Viigo would unequivocally be the better RSS reader. I admittedly have been in certain situations in which Newsgator Go was useless to me due to that very reason. In fact, just this past weekend my wife and I were at a department store and I wanted to check on my feeds while my wife was in the fitting room. However, I didn't have a connection and was unable to do so. I wasn't too disappointed, because I just played a game of Sudoku instead, but having Viigo would have clearly come in handy on that day.
    03-07-08 12:51 PM
  9. milwal's Avatar
    I agree with OP, Viigo is well over hyped and a massive memory hog, just deleted it myself and solved all my call log auto deletion problems!!!!!!!!!!! (theres 11 exclamation marks I must be right:-)
    03-29-08 07:47 AM
  10. vinmontRD's Avatar
    I agree with OP, Viigo is well over hyped and a massive memory hog, just deleted it myself and solved all my call log auto deletion problems!!!!!!!!!!! (theres 11 exclamation marks I must be right:-)
    That's a bit strange...

    Who has "over hyped" Viigo? Virtual Reach themselves? I don't think so, unless I've missed some kind of stealth campaign they've been running. "Hype" means "hyperbole", and refers to claims that are greatly exaggerated, often tongue in cheek, to make a point. Far as I know, Viigo hasn't made any exaggerated claims. They simply put out a product that a lot of people like. Have reviewers or users "hyped" it? Maybe, but I haven't seen this. Maybe you can post some links to exaggerated claims. Actually...something more typical of hype would be a statement like yours, when you claim it's a "massive memory hog".

    As a matter of fact, the reviews I can find online that talk about Viigo and memory use note that it's lean and light in this area. Maybe you can report back with some specifics re: the amount of memory you're showing in your Blackberry with and without Viigo installed and running? That would help.

    I've been using Viigo for several months and have it running around the clock. Also have a bunch of other apps installed, and a few running continuously in the background. How many articles do you have Viigo maintaining on your Blackberry? I have it set to 250 max articles, downloading every hour around the clock. Never once had a problem with any kind of "auto-deleting" of messages, logs, etc. Maybe it's something else running on your Blackberry?

    Let's see, beyond the standard BB stuff, I've got the following loaded:
    - BBWeather (running around the clock)
    - Weather Eye (updating every 30 mins)
    - Viigo (running continuously, refreshing 250 articles every hour)
    - Google Maps
    - Beyond 411
    - MS Live Search
    - Y! Go
    - JiveTalk (running continuously, hooked to four accounts)
    - Opera Mini
    - Mail by Google (Google Apps Premier version)
    - 18 different themes
    ...and Bluetooth is activated and running continuously

    Also: I generally leave the Curve on 24 x 7, and almost never do a battery pull. The whole platform has been incredibly stable.

    Oh: along with GMail, I've got 4 different email accounts being pulled in by regular Blackberry mail client, averaging anywhere from 50 to 75 email messages a day typically.

    The whole thing runs fine, with or without Viigo installed. I can't imagine why your experience would be so different, unless you've got it set to download a couple of thousand articles perhaps.

    Please share some specifics about the problems you've experienced with Viigo, along with memory figures with and without it installed. Maybe if you post the rest of your configuration, somebody here might recognized another issue and be able to offer advice.

    Hey - if you don't like a particular app, that's certainly your right. But it would help the rest of the folks here if your critique were either fact-based, or clearly just stating an opinion. Mixing the two can be misleading, and certainly raises an eyebrow when this is just your second post here...

    - Jon
    Last edited by vinmontRD; 03-30-08 at 09:43 AM.
    03-29-08 01:34 PM
  11. peter.janzen281's Avatar
    Wow, this is getting intense...
    I like google reader on the desktop, mainly for it's share feature ( just like Gmail app and the archive feature), but I rarely share from phone. I use freerange on the phone, I feel it's the easiest way to read on my BB. I've tried Viigo a few times, and my phone completely crashes every time.
    05-13-08 10:48 AM
  12. patrick.waugh's Avatar
    Many of us do not check rss feeds on the desktop, as we just go see what we want in full on the Web.

    So, I don't require it sync to anything. It knows what I have read, and it is simple for me to see what is new at any time, even with no connection as mentioned above.

    Besides, who uses their PC when they have a perfectly good Blackberry handy????

    The dude claiming memory problems just doesn't know what he's talking about, or how to properly install his OS to maximize memory. I have over 100 applications installed, and have no memory issues at all with Viigo.

    Patrick

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    05-13-08 12:31 PM
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