1. joeldf's Avatar
    Just a simple question, or inquiry really. But it goes with a long story.

    Yesterday, I leave from work to go home, and it's about a 14 mile drive that can take anywhere from 15 to up to 30 minutes from downtown Baton Rouge (west side, next to the Mississippi) to my neighborhood on the east side edge of town, depending on traffic.

    On my Pearl, I usually look at Google Maps with the traffic layer on as I head out. Now, I know about how Google gets this info, and I'd love to contribute, but my ol' 8100 has no GPS to properly help out. But that's not the point here.

    I look at the traffic and see that the east bound lanes of I-10 are all red where I normally get on. Fine, I might take the surface roads today. But as I get to the interstate, it looks all clear. I get on. I'm flying down the road as there is hardly any traffic. The opposite side west bound lanes are stopped, however... total stand-still for several miles. Google Maps shows they are all in the green, and usually they are. Something obviously happened that hasn't registered yet. By the time I get to the other end of town, a "serious accident" icon pops up where I-10 crosses the river. It shows the westbound lane of the bridge had the accident. This is what caused the backup I saw, yet 15 minutes later, only pockets of yellow starts to show up on the westbound lanes on Google Maps. There are still pockets of yellow in the eastbound lanes that I already flew down. I have to stop by a store first and do some quick shopping. Periodically while there, I check Google Maps to see how long it takes to show the traffic as I had already gone through. A full 30 minutes has done by since I left work and only then is Google Maps showing the traffic I experienced - all green on the eastbound lanes I traveled, and all red on the westbound lanes from the bridge to about 5 miles into town.

    So that tells me what I had suspected for a while, but was surprised at how much delay there was. I had guessed the delay might be about 10 to 15 minutes. But, here in Baton Rouge, there seems to be a good 30 minute delay between what happens on the roads and when Google Maps shows it. Maybe it's just me, but I'd hardly consider that "real-time".

    Has anyone else tested the delay in your area?

    Is it that some places may just have faster more current updates than other places?

    Just wondering.
    06-10-10 02:17 PM
  2. BlazorBoy's Avatar
    Do not things move more slowly in the South? Jk
    B B

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    06-11-10 06:05 AM
  3. joeldf's Avatar
    Do not things move more slowly in the South? Jk
    B B
    Normally, yes... until we get behind the wheel - look out.
    06-11-10 08:42 AM
  4. valorian's Avatar
    I use google maps often but have not used traffic layer much. I'll have to give this a try and see what happens.

    Thanks for this info.
    06-11-10 08:50 AM
  5. greydarrah's Avatar
    I have found it to be unbelievably accurate, but I would suspect that in some areas, it's better than in others.
    06-11-10 09:28 AM
  6. BlazorBoy's Avatar
    It has saved me from some delays in Cambridge MA (where we drive slowly owing to congestion, but think and talk fast!). Yet I am sure there
    are delays in its data feeds, same as with the Garmin which often shows nothing at all.

    DriveSafe.ly

    B B

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    06-11-10 03:43 PM
  7. webmastir's Avatar
    ...
    Now, I know about how Google gets this info,
    ...
    care to elaborate on that? where/how do they get their info?

    (btw, have you tried the traffic.com app? it's not too bad, imo)
    06-11-10 03:52 PM
  8. joeldf's Avatar
    care to elaborate on that? where/how do they get their info?

    (btw, have you tried the traffic.com app? it's not too bad, imo)
    Google calls it "crowdsourcing".

    Official Google Blog: The bright side of sitting in traffic: Crowdsourcing road congestion data

    In GPS capable phones, it sends back data to Google and they include what it gets in the traffic layer of it's maps. Now, I think they also get traffic data from local sources too - such as for the interstates (and could be why the delay is so long), but the surface roads are more from the phone data because that tends to be much more sporadic (a road will pop up with traffic info momentarily, but then go away) - if no one with a GPS happens to be on Google Map with the traffic layer on at the time, then it doesn't get any data on that road.

    That's why I wouldn't mind including my phone in the mix, but since I don't have a GPS capable phone, all I can do is watch.

    And, no, I haven't tried traffic.com. I'll look into it though - thanks for the suggestion.
    06-14-10 08:04 AM
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