04-15-17 10:10 AM
41 12
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  1. FF22's Avatar
    04-12-17 11:34 AM
  2. Justin Couto's Avatar
    Patient:doctor my arm hurt when I bend it this way, what do I do?
    Doctor: don't bend it!
    I would say the same thing for a finger print scanner!
    FF22 and xandros9 like this.
    04-12-17 12:31 PM
  3. Praganad's Avatar
    To assume that your information is safe from anyone or anything is a fallacy and #blissfullyignorant . We are the only ones that have power over our privacy.

    Posted using a VeryBold BlackBerry Q10
    FF22 likes this.
    04-12-17 12:46 PM
  4. mnns's Avatar
    Faking fingerprints is quite easy to be honest. There are easy to use kits off the shelf that fool most fingerprint scanners.
    When it comes to guarding your data you have to know exactly how safe you need it to be.
    Unlocking bio-metric methods like fingerprint, voice, iris or retina scanning are based on "what you have", which can easily be taken, stolen or copied.
    Passwords or secrets on the other hand is "what you know" which can't (at least today) be digitally extracted from you brain. They can use other methods obviously but they have to get to you first.
    You can also combine both.
    04-12-17 01:15 PM
  5. Ment's Avatar
    The researchers did not test their approach with real phones
    clickbait article.

    Why didn't the researchers as least do a proof-of-concept on an Iphone like their OWN.
    xandros9, skinnymike1 and TGR1 like this.
    04-12-17 01:20 PM
  6. Praganad's Avatar
    Faking fingerprints is quite easy to be honest. There are easy to use kits off the shelf that fool most fingerprint scanners.
    When it comes to guarding your data you have to know exactly how safe you need it to be.
    Unlocking bio-metric methods like fingerprint, voice, iris or retina scanning are based on "what you have", which can easily be taken, stolen or copied.
    Passwords or secrets on the other hand is "what you know" which can't (at least today) be digitally extracted from you brain. They can use other methods obviously but they have to get to you first.
    You can also combine both.
    Well stated my friend!

    Posted using a VeryBold BlackBerry Q10
    skinnymike1 likes this.
    04-12-17 01:21 PM
  7. anon(10101748)'s Avatar
    In the US from a legal perspective having a fingerprint sensor is dumb. Now if you're not worried about criminal activity it doesn't matter but follow me here.

    If you arrested and your device is seized as evidence, law enforcement has the right to fingerprint you which allows them to technically open your device. What they cannot do is force you to give an unlock code. That all said, just don't break the law, or don't get caught.
    Nathan Conley likes this.
    04-12-17 04:00 PM
  8. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    I've always considered the fingerprint sensor -- which I don't use -- as more of a convenient tool than security utility.
    xandros9 and ominaxe like this.
    04-12-17 04:58 PM
  9. EndRacism's Avatar
    The article I read; that, it, might, be, possible, to compile a generic fingerprint of common swirls that would be enough to fool a sensor, for 99.9 % of us, we only need to worry about the brat neighbor kid who finds your lost phone.
    04-12-17 05:40 PM
  10. Adam Frix's Avatar
    In the US from a legal perspective having a fingerprint sensor is dumb. Now if you're not worried about criminal activity it doesn't matter but follow me here.

    If you arrested and your device is seized as evidence, law enforcement has the right to fingerprint you which allows them to technically open your device. What they cannot do is force you to give an unlock code. That all said, just don't break the law, or don't get caught.
    So, just make sure you restart your phone if you think John Law is coming.

    Fingerprint won't open a freshly started phone.
    bluesqueen23 likes this.
    04-12-17 05:42 PM
  11. anon(10101748)'s Avatar
    So, just make sure you restart your phone if you think John Law is coming.

    Fingerprint won't open a freshly started phone.
    Touché ... not trying to create criminals here lol
    matthewkuhl likes this.
    04-12-17 05:46 PM
  12. ominaxe's Avatar
    Man, after reading all these angry posts about the lack of security, police seizures of prints, and spyware that adopters of Android will experience with the collapse of BB10, I'm just going to assume that anyone that doesn't want their phone searched or information seen is a drug dealer, pedophile, or terrorist.
    04-12-17 06:10 PM
  13. johnny_bravo72's Avatar
    I've always considered the fingerprint sensor -- which I don't use -- as more of a convenient tool than security utility.
    This.
    04-12-17 06:24 PM
  14. anon(10101748)'s Avatar
    Man, after reading all these angry posts about the lack of security, police seizures of prints, and spyware that adopters of Android will experience with the collapse of BB10, I'm just going to assume that anyone that doesn't want their phone searched or information seen is a drug dealer, pedophile, or terrorist.
    It's an interesting paradox, the want for privacy often is translated as a need to hide something. I guess for some that may be true so your point is valid. My take is more that mobile devices have become so powerful and app driven that I can use it like a computer in my home where I'd expect privacy protection.

    But the mobile device is on the person. Does having it in the car, or personally on you change privacy rules? I don't know. I'm way more worried about a department store getting hacked than my mobile phone. I guess I just think it's good to have the discussion. It's an interesting one that's all. Certainly not one to incite paranoia amongst the common person.
    04-12-17 08:27 PM
  15. ominaxe's Avatar
    Yeah, it really is a paradox. It's more along the lines of utilitarianism. What is the best security? Taking away individual privacy to give more security for the greater number of people, or is it better to try give more privacy to more people individually?
    Last edited by BigBadWulf; 04-13-17 at 08:11 AM. Reason: removed remarks that lead to off topic banter
    04-12-17 08:50 PM
  16. crucial bbq's Avatar
    The article I read; that, it, might, be, possible, to compile a generic fingerprint of common swirls that would be enough to fool a sensor, for 99.9 % of us, we only need to worry about the brat neighbor kid who finds your lost phone.
    Depends on how it is implemented. They don't exactly take a picture of your fingerprint, or they shouldn't, anyways.

    Blackberry has had a patent for a finger print scanner for near ten years now and their CSO had said they'd go with one once they figure out how to secure it. Perhaps they did?
    04-12-17 09:57 PM
  17. keyboardweeb's Avatar
    Depends on how it is implemented. They don't exactly take a picture of your fingerprint, or they shouldn't, anyways.

    Blackberry has had a patent for a finger print scanner for near ten years now and their CSO had said they'd go with one once they figure out how to secure it. Perhaps they did?
    Or they just said "Screw it, everybody else is doing it, we best do it too or we'll look old-fashioned."

    I might occasionally enable the fingerprint reader for convenience but I think I'll stick to good ol' passwords day to day. After all, the phone has a keyboard!
    FF22 likes this.
    04-13-17 08:22 AM
  18. Wezard's Avatar
    Finger print is to keep tourists and inlaws out. It's a bit of security and a lot of convenience. And a LOT of marketing.

    I could regularly unlock my wifes I6 with the second finger on my right hand, (the others didn't work, and even that one failed around a third of the time). She now has, whatever the latest is, and I can't unlock it. Her employer, a huge multinational will not accept the fingerprint as adequate security, they require the use of a password, same model phone.

    Biometrics do work, very well, but not at the price and size point that a phone will support.
    And as somebody said previously, it's something you have, rather than something you know.

    Personally, I'm quite happy with the security and convenience provided by trusted places, (home) and trusted devices, (bluetooth ear bud) along with a fairly good password.
    High security? No, but good enough for my needs. Convenience? Absolutely phenomenal. I'll take that over a fingerprint scanner any day.
    ominaxe likes this.
    04-13-17 10:19 AM
  19. EndRacism's Avatar
    Finger print is to keep tourists and inlaws out. It's a bit of security and a lot of convenience. And a LOT of marketing.

    I could regularly unlock my wifes I6 with the second finger on my right hand, (the others didn't work, and even that one failed around a third of the time). She now has, whatever the latest is, and I can't unlock it. Her employer, a huge multinational will not accept the fingerprint as adequate security, they require the use of a password, same model phone.

    Biometrics do work, very well, but not at the price and size point that a phone will support.
    And as somebody said previously, it's something you have, rather than something you know.

    Personally, I'm quite happy with the security and convenience provided by trusted places, (home) and trusted devices, (bluetooth ear bud) along with a fairly good password.
    High security? No, but good enough for my needs. Convenience? Absolutely phenomenal. I'll take that over a fingerprint scanner any day.
    Well said!
    04-13-17 10:40 AM
  20. Resilience's Avatar
    Fingerprints are treated as usernames instead of passwords, they will make you give it up
    04-13-17 01:58 PM
  21. Bla1ze's Avatar
    That all said, just don't break the law, or don't get caught.
    Well, that ruins my plans for the day. Thanks a lot!
    FF22 and matthewkuhl like this.
    04-13-17 04:25 PM
  22. slagman5's Avatar
    Well, that ruins my plans for the day. Thanks a lot!
    Well, you still got the "don't get caught" part going for you...
    04-13-17 04:36 PM
  23. anon(10101748)'s Avatar
    Well, that ruins my plans for the day. Thanks a lot!
    Lolz...

    Rule 1- Don't Get Caught

    Rule 2- See Rule 1

    *No brown nosing here, but my post may have ruined your day, but you responding made mine. Crazy respect for you Bla1ze. Many a man would have crumbled years ago but you kept the content coming and kept it real. Great job!
    04-13-17 04:39 PM
  24. Bla1ze's Avatar
    *No brown nosing here, but my post may have ruined your day, but you responding made mine. Crazy respect for you Bla1ze. Many a man would have crumbled years ago but you kept the content coming and kept it real. Great job!
    Thanks for taking the time and saying so, I appreciate it.
    anon(10101748) likes this.
    04-13-17 04:43 PM
  25. FF22's Avatar
    Well, that ruins my plans for the day. Thanks a lot!
    re: That all said, just don't break the law, or don't get caught

    Oh, you got caught already!
    04-13-17 05:27 PM
41 12

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