1. an9ie's Avatar
    So I just got the Key2 LE yesterday (been using the KeyOne since June 2017) and I went to take a couple pictures for the first time today and they came out BAD, real bad!! Is there something in the setting that are off? I heard the camera wasn't great but I wasn't expecting this.
    Last edited by an9ie; 01-05-20 at 04:25 PM.
    01-04-20 08:15 PM
  2. the_boon's Avatar
    So I just got the Key2 LE yesterday (been using the KeyOne since June 2017) and I went to take a couple pictures for the first time today and they came out BAD, real bad!! Is there something in the setting that are off? I heard the camera wasn't great but I was expecting this.
    Camera quality is definitely not the LE's strength, the KEYone had a better sensor.

    You can always try manual mode to see if it would get you better results.
    01-04-20 11:56 PM
  3. falbo's Avatar
    So I just got the Key2 LE yesterday (been using the KeyOne since June 2017) and I went to take a couple pictures for the first time today and they came out BAD, real bad!! Is there something in the setting that are off? I heard the camera wasn't great but I was expecting this.
    Not trying to be funny or anything but have you checked or cleaned the camera lens. Could a bit of protecting film residue be the culprit?
    Is the camera really that bad on the LE ?


    Posted via my beautiful priv
    01-05-20 05:54 AM
  4. an9ie's Avatar
    Not trying to be funny or anything but have you checked or cleaned the camera lens. Could a bit of protecting film residue be the culprit?
    Is the camera really that bad on the LE ?


    Posted via my beautiful priv
    Haha! I actually thought about that too and I checked 😉
    01-05-20 04:24 PM
  5. an9ie's Avatar
    It's when I zoom in that the quality gets real bad (grainy). I'm going to try the manual mode some more but I'm not a photographer, I'm a 'point and snap' type of picture taker so don't really know how to use manual mode.
    01-05-20 04:30 PM
  6. whatnow00's Avatar
    It's when I zoom in that the quality gets real bad (grainy). I'm going to try the manual mode some more but I'm not a photographer, I'm a 'point and snap' type of picture taker so don't really know how to use manual mode.
    Zoom on most phone cameras is digital zoom. It's not actually zooming in the lens; it's enlarging the pixels.
    01-05-20 04:48 PM
  7. an9ie's Avatar
    Zoom on most phone cameras is digital zoom. It's not actually zooming in the lens; it's enlarging the pixels.
    I get that, but it was real bad, it looked like I took a picture with an old flip phone.
    01-05-20 05:09 PM
  8. wmatsura's Avatar
    Yeah, KEYone's camera was waaay better. Basically, on auto mode, the KEY2 LE will shoot decent pics only when there's plenty light, quality decreases a lot in low light. Forget about zoom, sometimes is better to just set your camera to the max resolution and then crop the photo afterwards.

    But the manual mode is pretty user friendly, you just have to get acquaintance to what does what. Initially, the manual mode calculates everything automatically, only when you change the values of something is that it stops being auto.

    Quick intro guide: There are 5 values to set on manual mode (on the left side, from top to bottom, and you can adjust them by selecting one and dragging the bottom center selector) => Focus ("AF"); Shutter Speed; ISO; WB Balance; Exposure.
    • Focus - It adjusts how far you want the camera to focus, depending how far the subject of your photo is. Unless you're trying to take a picture with the background blurred, you can just let it on auto;
    • Shutter Speed - It defines how long the digital shutter will capture light. Therefore, the faster it is (smaller values, like 1/8000) the less amount of light is gonna be captured, resulting in a darker picture (if light conditions are not ideal) but also being capable of removing blurs from motion/shake. So, in a bright sunny day outdoors you can safely adjust it to faster speeds without ending up with a dark pic. On the other hand, in low light you wanna set it to slower speeds, keeping in mind that the photo is more likely to be blurred from motion/shake;
    • ISO - On the KEY2 LE it varies from 100 to 1600. Smaller values will give you darker but sharper images, whereas bigger values will give you brighter but grainy images. Ideally, you shouldn't go higher than 200 on the LE, in order to preserve the sharpness of your picture (but artistic pics in BW that explores the light nuances can get quite good with higher ISO, the grainy effect being intentional);
    • WB - It adjusts the collor of your photo. You can also leave it at auto mode;
    • Exposure - As the name suggests, it adjusts the light exposure of your photo, brighter or darker (but without compromising the sharpness of you image).


    All that said, it basically comes down to adjusting shutter speed, ISO and exposure on most cases and depending on the light situation (these 3 values change the brightness/darkness and overall sharpness of your image). As a preset, you can try: ISO 100; Shutter Speed from 1/50 to 1/150; Exposure as needed.

    P.S.: Sorry if it's too long to read. Also, english is not my native language, so forgive me for any possible mistakes on grammar or verbal agreement.
    tubularbell and Jamaa like this.
    01-08-20 02:22 PM
  9. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    It's when I zoom in that the quality gets real bad (grainy). I'm going to try the manual mode some more but I'm not a photographer, I'm a 'point and snap' type of picture taker so don't really know how to use manual mode.
    "Digital Zoom" really just means cropping the image and enlarging the pixels that remain. It's a terrible thing to do with any camera if you care about quality pictures. If you have a 16 MP sensor, and you have 2X Digital Zoom, when you zoom in fully, you end up with a 4 MP image.

    Yes, the K2 cameras aren't great, but digital zoom makes it much worse. Whenever possible, use your feet as your Zoom: get physically closer to your subject. Or... you can buy some inexpensive clip-on lenses. They work surprisingly well, but of course you have to have them with you.
    01-08-20 03:20 PM
  10. Jamaa's Avatar
    Yeah, KEYone's camera was waaay better. Basically, on auto mode, the KEY2 LE will shoot decent pics only when there's plenty light, quality decreases a lot in low light. Forget about zoom, sometimes is better to just set your camera to the max resolution and then crop the photo afterwards.

    But the manual mode is pretty user friendly, you just have to get acquaintance to what does what. Initially, the manual mode calculates everything automatically, only when you change the values of something is that it stops being auto.

    Quick intro guide: There are 5 values to set on manual mode (on the left side, from top to bottom, and you can adjust them by selecting one and dragging the bottom center selector) => Focus ("AF"); Shutter Speed; ISO; WB Balance; Exposure.
    • Focus - It adjusts how far you want the camera to focus, depending how far the subject of your photo is. Unless you're trying to take a picture with the background blurred, you can just let it on auto;
    • Shutter Speed - It defines how long the digital shutter will capture light. Therefore, the faster it is (smaller values, like 1/8000) the less amount of light is gonna be captured, resulting in a darker picture (if light conditions are not ideal) but also being capable of removing blurs from motion/shake. So, in a bright sunny day outdoors you can safely adjust it to faster speeds without ending up with a dark pic. On the other hand, in low light you wanna set it to slower speeds, keeping in mind that the photo is more likely to be blurred from motion/shake;
    • ISO - On the KEY2 LE it varies from 100 to 1600. Smaller values will give you darker but sharper images, whereas bigger values will give you brighter but grainy images. Ideally, you shouldn't go higher than 200 on the LE, in order to preserve the sharpness of your picture (but artistic pics in BW that explores the light nuances can get quite good with higher ISO, the grainy effect being intentional);
    • WB - It adjusts the collor of your photo. You can also leave it at auto mode;
    • Exposure - As the name suggests, it adjusts the light exposure of your photo, brighter or darker (but without compromising the sharpness of you image).


    All that said, it basically comes down to adjusting shutter speed, ISO and exposure on most cases and depending on the light situation (these 3 values change the brightness/darkness and overall sharpness of your image). As a preset, you can try: ISO 100; Shutter Speed from 1/50 to 1/150; Exposure as needed.

    P.S.: Sorry if it's too long to read. Also, english is not my native language, so forgive me for any possible mistakes on grammar or verbal agreement.


    These are very good instructions
    01-10-20 11:31 PM

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 46
    Last Post: 01-09-20, 10:22 AM
  2. Which sensor adjusts the camera exposure time?
    By jamescarruthers in forum BlackBerry Passport
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 01-03-20, 08:20 AM
  3. Commenting on FB - Camera vs. Video
    By edensgardener in forum BlackBerry KEYone
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-02-20, 09:51 AM
  4. What happens with the camera. Blackberry Passport.
    By KOEG in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 01-02-20, 08:24 AM
  5. How to set an Alarm DAYS in Advance?
    By nycinderella in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-24-19, 02:29 PM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD