08-27-09 03:05 AM
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  1. nb.shunter's Avatar
    So what do I do if I suspect someone has cloned my BlackBerry PIN? T-Mobile isn't any help what so ever.

    All of a sudden I wake up with someone's email accounts on my phone, and links to Indonesian mobile phone company, AXIS.
    08-21-09 09:43 AM
  2. es_bih's Avatar
    Get a new BB. Report it to RIM.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    08-21-09 10:39 AM
  3. fatboy97's Avatar
    I think I'd be calling T-Mobile and demanding to talk to RIM... see what RIM says... they are world wide.
    08-21-09 10:40 AM
  4. nb.shunter's Avatar
    I've called back so many times, it's pure insanity.

    "Try this, try this, try this." -- I explained to a few gals at T-Mobile Support, I'm pretty handy with a BlackBerry. I've already tried re-registering through the host routing table, wiping the device with JL_cmder and reloading the OS, etc. And their solution is for me to bring it into a T-Mobile store and then call back from there? I don't have time for that nonsense.
    08-21-09 10:54 AM
  5. Max69's Avatar
    If your PIN or IMEI number have been cloned, I don't think there's anything RIM or T-Mobile can do except replace the phone.
    08-21-09 11:03 AM
  6. nvious's Avatar
    If you have emails set up my first most important piece of advice is delete your emails settings from email setup so that they are not sent to your device anymore; if it has been cloned like you say, someone else could receive your emails as well..?

    Also report it to RIM and demand a brand new handset otherwise you will expose it as a security flaw which could be damaging to their reputation.
    08-21-09 11:08 AM
  7. nb.shunter's Avatar
    Max69-- Good looking out, I've already deleted my email accounts a few days ago, but this is an ongoing issue I'm having to battle with T-Mobile for a week now in the off hours I'm not at work and/or school.

    I've tried demanding a replacement from T-Mobile, but they don't want to do that, especially considering this BlackBerry I'm using now is a refurbished unit they sent me the first week of August. It worked fine for about 10 days, and then one morning I wake up with "Axis World" shortcuts, I can't login to "Manage Internet E-mail" to configure my T-Mobile BIS accounts, now that shortcut tells me I'm not provisioned for that, and there's a new "Email Settings" icon that once I click on, asks me to accept the RIM's/AXIS World's BIS Terms of Service. There's also a new shorcut for "Axis Mall" (although it's labeled "xlmall" or something), and I have two new email accounts on my phone that end in ".co.id" (definitely not mine, and don't show up under T-mobile.com's BIS settings when I use my desktop).

    Ontop of all that, my MMS isn't working anymore.
    08-21-09 11:19 AM
  8. Max69's Avatar
    Like I said, AFIK the only fix is to replace the phone. No amount of wiping, OS reloading or anything else is going to help you. The longer you let it go, the more risk you run of someone getting your personal information. If they're asking you to take it to a store, it sounds like they may be willing to replace it.
    08-21-09 11:32 AM
  9. nb.shunter's Avatar
    I understand that, I just wanted to make sure there wasn't some kind of database mix up with RIM, T-Mobile, and AXIS with my BIS account/PIN.

    That being said, T-Mobile is refusing to replace the phone via Telephone Support. I'm going to go to the store tonight and see how that works out.
    08-21-09 11:45 AM
  10. E-Phone's Avatar
    I've called back so many times, it's pure insanity.

    ".... And their solution is for me to bring it into a T-Mobile store and then call back from there? I don't have time for that nonsense.
    T-Mobile is usually very helpful in cases like these. Have you been nice to them when you talk to them? Something is not clear to me. You don't have time to go to T-Mobile store, while you seem to have a lot of time to write these notes.
    08-21-09 12:06 PM
  11. nb.shunter's Avatar
    Yes, I've been nice to them.

    And I can write lots of notes while I'm at work
    08-21-09 12:08 PM
  12. RichieHD's Avatar
    Let us know how it goes for you.
    08-21-09 12:13 PM
  13. nb.shunter's Avatar
    I might add to my previous post, there's two companies who, in my experience, have always had absolutely AMAZING technical support, T-Mobile and IBM/Lenovo. Being a T-Mobile customer for 6 years now, I've never once had an issue with them except for the last week.
    08-21-09 12:14 PM
  14. TheScionicMan's Avatar
    It could possibly be an issue where AXIS activated a phone and entered the wrong PIN or IMEI or something and that is causing the crossover confusion. Does the device show what the email address is? Perhaps you can email it and see if they are having trouble activating their phone? or try sending a BBM? Is there a support listing for AXIS, perhaps?
    08-21-09 12:44 PM
  15. nb.shunter's Avatar
    That's what I originally thought thats what it could be, some sort of PIN mixup. But according to T-Mobile, "that's impossible."

    I looked up the AXIS website (axisworld.co.id), and already emailed them a few days ago, but I haven't received a response yet. They do have a phone number listed, but it's not really a local call here from the USA

    I did notice though, that RIM has an 800 number, so I'm going to try and call them on my lunch and see where that takes me.
    08-21-09 01:03 PM
  16. E-Phone's Avatar
    I believe the RIM has a charge for help on the phone unless T-Mobile connects you to them.
    08-21-09 02:49 PM
  17. jwolfe99's Avatar
    That's what I originally thought thats what it could be, some sort of PIN mixup. But according to T-Mobile, "that's impossible."

    I looked up the AXIS website (axisworld.co.id), and already emailed them a few days ago, but I haven't received a response yet. They do have a phone number listed, but it's not really a local call here from the USA

    I did notice though, that RIM has an 800 number, so I'm going to try and call them on my lunch and see where that takes me.
    Ok this is a long shot but may be of some help so I will post it, no expert here just trying to help. Maybe you got a refurb who someone had u/l a new os to , like beta, and did not delete the vendor.xml file.. Yep its cheezy but wanted to try and help out. Or maybe I did not read the whole post or missed something but I thought the PIN was a engraved in the phone thing.

    Julian
    08-21-09 02:52 PM
  18. nb.shunter's Avatar
    ALL FIXED

    So I ended up calling RIM's Pay-Per-Incident support number on my lunch, and after explaining the situation and being transferred from "support rep" to "insider" to "engineer", they were more than willing to help me out for free.

    First off, I must say there was no clonage. But what the engineer did inform me of, I was not aware of. More than one BlackBerry can have the same pin. Yes, read that again. The man in Indonesia received a new BlackBerry and when changing devices he apparently edited the text-box (for whatever reason) that asks to confirm your new PIN, and used/typed in my PIN. The engineer further stated that in NO WAY did the Indonesian ever receive my email, but I did receive his when he did this. He then removed my PIN from this fellow's account, had me delete all my service books, and he resent my normal t-mobile ones, and everything is magical once again.
    08-21-09 05:53 PM
  19. larrygump's Avatar
    wierd!!!!!!
    08-21-09 06:05 PM
  20. Branta's Avatar
    ALL FIXED

    So I ended up calling RIM's Pay-Per-Incident support number on my lunch, and after explaining the situation and being transferred from "support rep" to "insider" to "engineer", they were more than willing to help me out for free.

    First off, I must say there was no clonage. But what the engineer did inform me of, I was not aware of. More than one BlackBerry can have the same pin. Yes, read that again. The man in Indonesia received a new BlackBerry and when changing devices he apparently edited the text-box (for whatever reason) that asks to confirm your new PIN, and used/typed in my PIN. The engineer further stated that in NO WAY did the Indonesian ever receive my email, but I did receive his when he did this. He then removed my PIN from this fellow's account, had me delete all my service books, and he resent my normal t-mobile ones, and everything is magical once again.
    I think you have at least partially correct facts there. Another user in Indonesia setup the same PIN in his BIS configuration. Service books with his email were duly pushed out and broadcast across the network, and your phone with the same PIN accepted them. So YOU would receive HIS emails.

    Equally, if you send your service books, and someone else has a phone with the same PIN - your service books will be accepted on the other phone if it sees them. You're right, that could compromise all your message traffic.

    Now, here's the crunch. The IMEI is also the device serial number, and it should be associated with a unique PIN. There is no way two decices should ever have identical PIN when released from manufacture. RIM writes the PIN and IMEI to the finished phone in the last stages of manufacture - using software. The RIM network uses the PIN to identify each phone and push data to the correct device. If there is a duplication within RIM production that would be an error.

    Unfortunately that software has been stolen and distributed on various internet sites and torrents, and it came into the hands of dishonest individuals who used it to give stolen and blocked phones a new identity (new IMEI and PIN). The easy way to do this is to clone a matching pair IMEI and PIN from a legal phone, because these will already occur in the RIM databases. We have seen a few user reports similar to yours, with apparently innocent users finding they are getting unknown emails delivered. The majority of reported problems have involved... Indonesia on one side or another. We also get members asking how to use the stolen software, and a good proportion are from... Indonesia. You may reach your own conclusion about this.

    So the bottom line is that a duplicate PIN may exist, but it is probably a phone illegally reworked. It may be in the hands of a criminal, but more likely it was sold to an innocent and unsuspecting user in Indonesia.
    08-21-09 06:31 PM
  21. larrygump's Avatar
    damn indonesians criminals
    08-21-09 06:33 PM
  22. Branta's Avatar
    damn indonesians criminals
    In this case probably indonesian, but there have also been dodgy questions from other countries including US and Cananda. There is no certainty about where the crime was committed, only that the "other" phone ended up on an Indonesian carrier and probably used by an unsuspecting owner. Come to that, it is even possible the dodgy phone was recycled as refurb to USA, and the legit one is elsewhere.
    08-21-09 06:41 PM
  23. TheScionicMan's Avatar
    It doesn't sound like 2 phones had the same PIN, the user just entered the PIN incorrectly. Each PIN should be unique, just like the MAC address of a NIC.
    08-21-09 07:04 PM
  24. larrygump's Avatar
    my thoughts exactly
    08-21-09 07:13 PM
  25. nb.shunter's Avatar
    Branta-- I was not saying RIM made an error in duplicate manufacturing. If you'd like I can give you my mobile number (if you're local) and I can discuss further what exactly the engineer told me.
    08-21-09 07:49 PM
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