1. infinus's Avatar
    .
    I was reading some rumours which says NOKIA/Microsoft made bid for RIM (BlackBerry).

    Imagine if this has come true. And winMobile with BB keypad and more fusions of microsoft+NOKIA+RIM has been released.
    Would you still buy/loyal to new makers.
    01-05-12 05:08 AM
  2. greggebhardt's Avatar
    Much will depend on what MS does with RIM. MS just could get RIM back on course. Hearing that the DOD is considering leaving RIM for Android and Apple makes you wonder how much longer RIM can go without a BIG change!

    I would love to get instant iMap email on my new Nokia Ace
    01-05-12 05:58 AM
  3. kbz1960's Avatar
    Huumm MicroRIM or RIMsoft?
    01-05-12 06:57 AM
  4. infinus's Avatar
    These are tough times..
    apple paying offline for patent infringement.
    MS/NOKIA secretly dealing for smart phone business.
    New Chairperson for RIM.
    ....
    2012 is sure a big change...
    big competition.
    01-05-12 07:21 AM
  5. emirozmen's Avatar
    9900 with windows phone mango would be awesome!!! I have really liked the windows phone OS, plus the 9900 form factor = top seller
    01-05-12 07:39 AM
  6. ubizmo's Avatar
    In 2008, Microsoft bought Danger, the company that developed and supported the SideKick. The SideKick platform was actually pretty advanced for its time, offering some features that I still don't have on my BB. Unfortunately, T-Mobile US, the main carrier of the SideKick, had decided to keep it as a low-budget device in its lineup, so the device was crippled by various built-in limits to throttle data usage. Even so, it became fairly popular, and eventually Danger's servers couldn't keep up, and service interruptions became more frequent. I had SideKicks from early 2003 (the brand started in late 2002), and by late 2007 there were outages or severe slowdowns almost every week. That's when I switched to a BB 8320.

    Early in 2008, when Microsoft bought the whole enterprise, service began to improve (as I was told by others who still had SideKicks). MS clearly had the money to shore up the infrastructure. But development of new models and features ground to a halt. It wasn't clear exactly why MS bought Danger, but it obviously wasn't to do anything bold or innovative.

    In October 2009 there was a massive server failure and the data stored in the cloud was permanently lost. In 2010, the Danger SideKick was discontinued, and cloud services ended in May, 2011.

    I thought I'd share that as one example of what could happen when MS buys a telecom company that was, in some ways, similar to RIM (devices designed to function by means of back-end proxy servers), although much smaller. In the SideKick case, MS simply ran the company into the ground.

    I can see how the strategic plan of MS to compete with iOS and Android might involve clearing the playing field first. MS already has a strong presence in the Enterprise world, so it would make sense to buy RIM, with an eye to supplanting RIM's place in that niche, but without losing sight of the larger consumer market. From the MS point of view, four platforms is too many, and RIM is the best candidate to be removed from the game board.

    MS is pushing WP7 hard, and is starting it's own App Store for computers in February, putting the pieces together for an integrated app ecosystem like Apple's. My guess is that if MS were to buy RIM, it would quietly cannibalize what it could use and spit out the rest. BlackBerry would cease to exist as a distinct platform within a year or so.
    01-05-12 07:47 AM
  7. infinus's Avatar
    In 2008, Microsoft bought Danger, the company that developed and supported the SideKick. The SideKick platform was actually pretty advanced for its time, offering some features that I still don't have on my BB. Unfortunately, T-Mobile US, the main carrier of the SideKick, had decided to keep it as a low-budget device in its lineup, so the device was crippled by various built-in limits to throttle data usage. Even so, it became fairly popular, and eventually Danger's servers couldn't keep up, and service interruptions became more frequent. I had SideKicks from early 2003 (the brand started in late 2002), and by late 2007 there were outages or severe slowdowns almost every week. That's when I switched to a BB 8320.

    Early in 2008, when Microsoft bought the whole enterprise, service began to improve (as I was told by others who still had SideKicks). MS clearly had the money to shore up the infrastructure. But development of new models and features ground to a halt. It wasn't clear exactly why MS bought Danger, but it obviously wasn't to do anything bold or innovative.

    In October 2009 there was a massive server failure and the data stored in the cloud was permanently lost. In 2010, the Danger SideKick was discontinued, and cloud services ended in May, 2011.

    I thought I'd share that as one example of what could happen when MS buys a telecom company that was, in some ways, similar to RIM (devices designed to function by means of back-end proxy servers), although much smaller. In the SideKick case, MS simply ran the company into the ground.

    I can see how the strategic plan of MS to compete with iOS and Android might involve clearing the playing field first. MS already has a strong presence in the Enterprise world, so it would make sense to buy RIM, with an eye to supplanting RIM's place in that niche, but without losing sight of the larger consumer market. From the MS point of view, four platforms is too many, and RIM is the best candidate to be removed from the game board.

    MS is pushing WP7 hard, and is starting it's own App Store for computers in February, putting the pieces together for an integrated app ecosystem like Apple's. My guess is that if MS were to buy RIM, it would quietly cannibalize what it could use and spit out the rest. BlackBerry would cease to exist as a distinct platform within a year or so.
    As you have mentioned MS already hold great in corporate world and so does BB.
    It could be birth of new device with excellent software and hardware to support ever demanding corporate world.
    01-05-12 08:15 AM
  8. greggebhardt's Avatar
    As you have mentioned MS already hold great in corporate world and so does BB.
    It could be birth of new device with excellent software and hardware to support ever demanding corporate world.
    These days you got to be versitile and not only attract the corporate users but private users, too. This is what killed RIM, well that and the playbook.
    01-05-12 08:33 AM
  9. infinus's Avatar
    These days you got to be versitile and not only attract the corporate users but private users, too. This is what killed RIM, well that and the playbook.

    RIM should make
    1. BlackBerry
    &
    2. Banana

    BlackBerry for corporate and messaging lovers with more organiser tools, rich text facilities, high powered batteries, etc..
    &
    Banana's for rest of thing people do like watching videos, listening music, playing games, styling with kind of apps they have, hugh touch screen, browsing internet for something, etc..
    01-05-12 09:01 AM
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