08-30-11 04:22 PM
44 12
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  1. flyersfan76's Avatar
    Thats probably the feature I'm looking forward to the most, but when is it coming out? Not for a while I don't think. I wonder, what can I do today?
    Do you have a car? I am sure Couche-**** has these in the store and also at the fuel dispensers.

    Most of the stores that I frequent in the states have them inside and outside.

    I plan on having it on my phone just in case I forget my wallet and I really need gas.
    08-12-11 07:49 AM
  2. robtanz's Avatar
    What if your phone is stolen and you don't have a password when you lock it? What kind of damage can be done?

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    I guess this is where services like Blackberry Protect come in.
    08-12-11 07:53 AM
  3. flyersfan76's Avatar
    This isn't the second coming. NFC has been around in full commercial use since 2006. The things you describe are already being done overseas. Here in North America, the same things are accomplished with fobs(RFID and NFC)/smart cards(iclass/Smart cards)/etc...

    Statistics show that it is much easier to lose an integrated device than a stand alone one...lol I go through 100s of requests a day for new access devices (Non standard), and if security wasn't an issue, then it would have already put into effect here.
    You did notice that the OP asked what they could use NFC for now right.

    That is why I wrote what I did.

    The fact that companies can eliminate the cards that they have now or need to buy in the future is the cool and the "new" part to them because the phone aspect is only now taking off.

    And I believe it has been around a lot longer since 2006.

    Mobil helped develop a similar technology back in the 90's but it is RFID based.

    smijes likes this.
    08-12-11 07:57 AM
  4. flyersfan76's Avatar
    For example, your car has an NFC chip tied to the door locks and the ignition system. You walk up and tap the door with your phone and it unlocks. Then you get inside and either place the phone in a special receptacle or tap it against a special pad and the car starts.
    That would personally suck.

    It would be nice if you didn't have to tap anything and just leave your phone in your pocket like some cars enable you to do with the keys.

    On some cars already you just have to be near it for the key to interact with the car. That is probably RFID so I guess it wouldn't work that well. Would be nice though.
    08-12-11 08:04 AM
  5. dadymon's Avatar
    Seems like the potential use for NFC is unlimited. 9900 for me!
    08-12-11 08:54 AM
  6. AbstraKt's Avatar
    Cashless society is being fulfilled before our very eyes.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    I think you mean "paper-money." Cash is still king.
    08-12-11 08:58 AM
  7. KingKuba's Avatar
    NFC is pointless in Canada right now.

    People get so excited about it as a feature or this phone won't have nfc...

    By the time nfc becomes widespread/useful you'll be on a new phone already.
    ADGrant and Bla1ze like this.
    08-12-11 09:52 AM
  8. chmaro's Avatar
    What about using NFC for pairing Bluetooth devices? Would make things a bit easier. Just tap your bluetooth device to your phone and it pairs right away.
    08-12-11 03:43 PM
  9. tcseacliff's Avatar
    Sweet, thanks!

    So I guess RIM put NFC in the phone just to say they had it, but it doesn't actually have many applications yet.
    a solution looking for a problem. many inventions started that way.
    08-12-11 04:32 PM
  10. OniBerry's Avatar
    You did notice that the OP asked what they could use NFC for now right.

    That is why I wrote what I did.

    The fact that companies can eliminate the cards that they have now or need to buy in the future is the cool and the "new" part to them because the phone aspect is only now taking off.

    And I believe it has been around a lot longer since 2006.

    Mobil helped develop a similar technology back in the 90's but it is RFID based.

    Yeah, I understood what the Op asked.

    Did not say it has been around since 2006. I said it was commercially available.

    NFC TimeLine

    1983 The first patent to be associated with the abbreviation RFID was granted to Charles Walton.
    2004 Nokia, Sony and Phillips Establish The Near Field Communication (NFC) Forum
    2006 Initial Specifications for NFC Tags
    2006 Specification For "SmartPoster" Records
    2006 Nokia 6131 is the first NFC phone
    2009 January, NFC releases Peer-to-Peer Standards to transfer contact, URL, initiate Bluetooth, etc. (Had to be done because of the limit of information that can be xfer'd using NFC protocols)
    2010 Samsung Nexus S - First Android NFC (Not first mobile phone) Phone shown
    2011 Google demonstrates NFC to initiate a game and to share a contact, URL, app, video, etc.
    08-12-11 05:01 PM
  11. AbstraKt's Avatar
    It looks as if the AT&T 9900 will be shipping w/o the NFC, which may be causing the holdup.
    08-12-11 05:22 PM
  12. BlackScorpion3's Avatar
    ive heard rumor on net that verizon and tmobile are blocking the feature. im not sure how but article said it interferes with the network in some way.
    I honestly find it hard to believe that it interferes with the network. These phones are tested very well by RIM before they even hit carriers hands for testing. If it was an issue with it interfering with the network, It more than likely would not even be in the hardware for that carriers release, as this cost rim more money to make the phone capable of this.

    I see this as a ploy for carriers to slowly direct customers away from phones they feel are not "worthy" (money makers).

    Carriers can affect the sale of phones many ways good and bad. They can make a phone be a best seller or a flop based on marketing and what they train their sales reps to sell (selling points). VZW pretty much saved Motorola with the push of Droids, but sealed the coffin for Palm.

    By limiting one of the best features and strongest selling points of a device you are limiting sales of that device and pushing sales towards another. Droids sell more devices simply because the carriers want the reps to push those devices (higher profit margin). Not, because they are better phones. Consumers buy what they are told to buy, we are in a world of mindless consumers who can not think for themselves.And, most couldnt tell you the difference between a Blackberry, and iPhone or an Android based device. As a matter of fact a majority of consumers believe the iPhone 4 is a 4G device (does this mean iPhone 5 is 5G?).

    I beg carriers to please leave devices alone and sell them with the features the manufacturer intended them to have. Quite short changing the consumers and then charging them more for less.

    If RIM had their own service I would jump ship from any carrier to them, just so I could make sure my device was capable of running the way it was meant to be, regardless of cost....
    tryfe likes this.
    08-12-11 05:35 PM
  13. OniBerry's Avatar
    If it is a software block, then what is to stop you from loading a non-stock OS and buying an aftermarket NFC tagged backplate?
    08-12-11 05:45 PM
  14. BlackScorpion3's Avatar
    If it is a software block, then what is to stop you from loading a non-stock OS and buying an aftermarket NFC tagged backplate?

    Nothing at all is stopping you. Like I said its the carriers way to help control the sale of certain products, cut features off a device. Would you buy a PS3 from Best Buy if they made it so it could not play Blue Ray DVD's???

    Sent from my BlackBerry 9650 using Tapatalk
    08-12-11 05:56 PM
  15. ravenlyon's Avatar
    I work for a major american credit card company that is testing google wallet on the google nexus s phone that is an NFC based payment option .... If/when RIM updates BB wallet to support NFC it will be very simple to use if your credit card company or bank support NFC also

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    08-12-11 08:10 PM
  16. flyersfan76's Avatar
    Yeah, I understood what the Op asked.

    Did not say it has been around since 2006. I said it was commercially available.
    I honestly have no idea why I wrote what I wrote and how I wrote it at this point. I probably even stepped into other other technologies that may or may not be the same or compatible. No Bubbles No Troubles.

    I like so many of us what to learn as much as I can about it because I wouldn't say my job depends on it BUT my job can benefit from it in a big way.

    The HID company who I believe is the proximity card leader uses RFID but is it the same or compatible who knows? If it is how can we as consumers take our issued cards and make them work?

    Heck am checking all 3 of the threads about NFC on these forums to see what else I am missing or learning.

    BTW, does anyone know of a forum or other places to learn about this tech? The only ones that I have seen have to be paid for or look like companies trying to peddle their wares.


    Also found and used this for the first time tonight.
    what is blink - Chase blink
    08-12-11 09:13 PM
  17. OniBerry's Avatar
    I honestly have no idea why I wrote what I wrote and how I wrote it at this point. I probably even stepped into other other technologies that may or may not be the same or compatible. No Bubbles No Troubles.

    I like so many of us what to learn as much as I can about it because I wouldn't say my job depends on it BUT my job can benefit from it in a big way.

    The HID company who I believe is the proximity card leader uses RFID but is it the same or compatible who knows? If it is how can we as consumers take our issued cards and make them work?

    Heck am checking all 3 of the threads about NFC on these forums to see what else I am missing or learning.

    BTW, does anyone know of a forum or other places to learn about this tech? The only ones that I have seen have to be paid for or look like companies trying to peddle their wares.


    Also found and used this for the first time tonight.
    what is blink - Chase blink
    No worries. You can google ISIS (Partnership for mobile payment standards with carrier companies and the four major american credit card companies)

    For information on NFC you could try this
    NFC World

    Cheers,
    Last edited by Oniberry; 08-12-11 at 09:43 PM. Reason: wrong link
    08-12-11 09:35 PM
  18. Mutnat's Avatar
    Is there an App I can get to allow me to start using it as a swipe-card replacement? That would be handy for sure.
    08-30-11 03:50 PM
  19. OniBerry's Avatar
    Not that I know of, a few are in development (business-wise), but nothing about a BlackBerry App.
    08-30-11 04:22 PM
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