11-09-11 11:28 PM
66 123
tools
  1. anakin1979's Avatar
    At some point, I had both the 9900 and the GSII as I needed to sell the 9900 to fully switch to Android. Here are some objective observations:

    - Signal Reception: I live in the suburbs and signal from my carrier isn't that strong. On my 9900, I had totally no signal in my room. It would gain one to two bars in the dining room, which was very inconvenient for me. On the GSII, I had three bars in my room and full signal everywhere else. GSII wins here.

    - Screen: The SGII's screen is an AMOLED display, and I have to say that it is truly brilliant and colors are vivid. The 9900 has a good screen as well. However, it is small and inconvenient for browsing full websites. GSII wins here.

    - Build: The 9900 feels more well constructed and feels great in the hand. The GSII is large and VERY VERY surprisingly light. The 9900 has a great physical keyboard, while the GSII is a full touch screen device with one physical home button. 9900 wins here.

    - Camera: The 9900 is a 5 MP camera with no real auto focus. The GSII has an 8 MP camera with true autofocus and takes superior macro shots compared to the blurry ones taken on the 9900. Also, the GSII has a front facing camera for Skype calls. The 9900 takes 720P HD video, while the GSII takes 1080P HD video. Comparing the actual shots taken, the ones from the 9900 looked good, but the GSII videos were still more detailed and superior. GSII wins here.

    - PIM Applications: I'd have to say this is a tie. Both OSs handle the PIM information pretty well.

    - Speed: The 9900 is a 1.2 GHz equipped phone, while the GSII is a dual core 1.2GHz phone. The 9900 does perform more snappily vs it's 9780 predecessor. However, the GSII is way faster at everything. GSII wins.

    - Push E-Mail: I set up five e-mail accounts on my GSII. A bit disappointed it couldn't setup regular Yahoo mail vs BIS which can handle it without problems. However- I preferred the HTML e-mail rendering on the GSII. Push e-mail though, in terms of speed: e-mails came in at the same time on the two devices and on my IMAP personal e-mail, the push e-mails actually came first on the GSII. GSII wins.

    - Speakerphone: My callers had to ask me to speak louder when talking through speakerphone on my 9900 whenever I was driving. On the GSII, not a single complaint. GSII wins.

    - Apps: On my 9900- Facebook, Twitter, Wikitude, Foursquare, Yahoo Messenger, etc. On my GSII- all of the apps that my BB had, plus the ones I had needed for a long time: Shazam (not available on OS7 last time I checked), Google+, Skype (so useful for me with my communication needs for business partners overseas), Kindle (so relieved I am now using this!), Jeannie (the Siri equivalent from iPhone4S), Goggles, Google Sky Map, eBay, Marvel Comic reader, CNN, Flickr, AIM (strangely not available on OS7), iMDB (can someone tell me if they have this on OS7?), oh and I just love the fact that I can now play Angry Birds and Talking Tom!!!! All the apps I downloaded on my GSII were and are free and fully functional. Obviously - GSII wins.

    - Browser: 9900 browser was an improvement, but no Flash. GSII, aside from being faster and snappier, has Flash enabled. Looks heaps better on the larger screen estate. GSII wins.

    - Connectivity: 9900 has the basics and NFC. Though I have yet to find any use for NFC. Also, my WiFi loses connection whenever I am in my garage. The GSII has all the connectivity options from the 9900 sans NFC (but is available in other GSII variations), and can serve as a WiFi hotspot. I heard this will be available for OS7 at some point, but if we are talking about the present, GSII already has it. GSII wins.

    - Battery Life: This is where I was pleasantly surprised, given the reputation that Android devices have on battery life. My 9900 could last me about 18 hours, my GSII did the same! I had push email enabled on the GSII. One thing I have to mention though is that I bought the extended battery that Samsung released for the GSII (2000mh vs the stock 1650mh). This is a tie.

    - GPS: This was a big hit and miss for my 9900. On the GSII, this was fast and always accurate. GSII wins.

    The only things that the GSII lack are the LED indicator and of course, BBM.

    However- given all the points I gave- I have absolutely no regrets moving over to the Galaxy SII and I am totally appreciative of the Android OS.

    I am still waiting for official news from Samsung and Google if Android's latest operating system, Ice Cream Sandwich, will be supported on the GSII. Given though that Samsung always delivers on their statements, if they say that they will support it, I am sure that they will. Something that I can't say about RIM, who has released many misleading timeline announcements.
    pantlesspenguin and Najo like this.
    11-01-11 12:23 PM
  2. anon(13322)'s Avatar
    The S2 is a great device! I hope you love it!
    11-01-11 12:34 PM
  3. anakin1979's Avatar
    I do not love it. I absolutely love it.

    For anyone out there with questions on the S2, just post here and I will be glad to answer them for you.
    11-01-11 12:36 PM
  4. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    Love Goggles. It is quite useful from time to time.
    11-01-11 12:44 PM
  5. CrackedBarry's Avatar
    As an owner of a HTC Evo 3D and the SGSII I can absolutely confirm what the gentleman above me wrote.

    (BTW: I also have an iPad 2 and Acer Iconia A100, so if anybody is looking to switch from the Playbook, and have some questions, feel free to ask away!)

    The Evo, as well as HTCs other phones have some advantages over the SGSII, (mainly the higher resolution QHD screen and HTC's Sense and other services) but overall the SGSII is the best Android phone right now. Its one of the few Android phones with a user interface as smooth as the iPhone, and the battery life is one of the best on the platform. Sure, the old BBOS6 phones can have better battery life, but it lasts as long, and usually longer than the 9900 and the other BBOS7 phones...
    11-01-11 12:48 PM
  6. psufan32's Avatar
    Have an AT&T GSII, and pretty much agree all around. It is a terrific device, and I couldn't be happier.

    Some comments:

    1) The screen on the GSII is very good, but I do find the screen on my wife's iPhone 4 to be better.

    2) The selection of useful apps (no, CBers, not game and 'toy' apps) is night and day between BB and Apple/Android.

    3) The GSII is well made and sturdy, but my old 9700 felt VERY solid. The GSII wins on aesthetics, but the 9700 wins on durability and 'toughness'.

    4) The camera on the GSII is extremely good. It is definitely better than the camera on my wife's iPhone 4. I'd bet, though, that the iPhone 4S would leapfrog the GSII.

    5) E-mail, with my Gmail account, is every bit as fast as it was with the 9700. And, it syncs between phone and desktop MUCH faster.

    6) Battery life was my biggest concern, but I'm easily getting a full day, and more often than not, two days, out of this phone.

    EDIT:

    7) There has always been a lot of chatter on CB about Android forced closes, etc. Haven't experienced any of that stuff. Nor have I experienced any malware, etc. Of course, I don't know what one would be doing on a phone to acquire malware... but that is a different topic altogether.
    Last edited by psufan32; 11-01-11 at 12:54 PM.
    11-01-11 12:51 PM
  7. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    Have an AT&T GSII, and pretty much agree all around. It is a terrific device, and I couldn't be happier.

    Some comments:

    1) The screen on the GSII is very good, but I do find the screen on my wife's iPhone 4 to be better.

    2) The selection of useful apps (no, CBers, not game and 'toy' apps) is night and day between BB and Apple/Android.

    3) The GSII is well made and sturdy, but my old 9700 felt VERY solid. The GSII wins on aesthetics, but the 9700 wins on durability and 'toughness'.

    4) The camera on the GSII is extremely good. It is definitely better than the camera on my wife's iPhone 4. I'd bet, though, that the iPhone 4S would leapfrog the GSII.

    5) E-mail, with my Gmail account, is every bit as fast as it was with the 9700. And, it syncs between phone and desktop MUCH faster.

    6) Battery life was my biggest concern, but I'm easily getting a full day, and more often than not, two days, out of this phone.

    EDIT:

    7) There has always been a lot of chatter on CB about Android forced closes, etc. Haven't experienced any of that stuff. Nor have I experienced any malware, etc. Of course, I don't know what one would be doing on a phone to acquire malware... but that is a different topic altogether.





    Exactly. I guess the browsing experience leads to increased exploration for some?
    11-01-11 01:07 PM
  8. CrackedBarry's Avatar
    [/B]



    Exactly. I guess the browsing experience leads to increased exploration for some?
    Nahh... The only way to get malware on an Android phone is if you install it yourself. And there are plenty of safeguards in place. Android is much more secure than their reputation here (weird, eh?). Nine out of ten times when you hear of a new Android "threat" its some sort of theoretical threat that never goes anywhere...

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    11-01-11 01:21 PM
  9. AugustArborists's Avatar
    Holy cow, everyone is being so civilized! Well, this IS Crackberry, so I feel the need to bash anyone no singing the praise of our beleaguered devises. Here goes:

    Android users smell funny, and are not allowed in the state of Montana!

    Yeah, I'm kidding, and I have to say, the Galaxy sounds like a pretty cool piece of hardware. What you carry is your choice, and I hope you enjoy it as much as I enjoy mine.
    11-01-11 01:39 PM
  10. chrispmoto's Avatar
    Yahoo mail. Can the Galaxy get it? If so, what are the issues, if any, receiving yahoo mail?
    11-01-11 01:40 PM
  11. DannyAves's Avatar
    Nahh... The only way to get malware on an Android phone is if you install it yourself. And there are plenty of safeguards in place. Android is much more secure than their reputation here (weird, eh?). Nine out of ten times when you hear of a new Android "threat" its some sort of theoretical threat that never goes anywhere...

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    I suppose if you install nothing and don't go anywhere on the Internet then you can't get malware.

    In August 2011, McAfee recently stated that malware for Androids phones jumped 76% since the last quarter which makes it the most heavily attacked mobile OS. McAfee has also found 12 million unique types of malware in the first half of 2011, a 22% increase from a year ago, and expects that by the end of the year they will have 75 million samples of malware in their database


    McAfee says Android plagued by the most malware | Mobile - CNET News

    The Android Market allows anyone to submit any app for download, without it being tested for quality or security. In fact, according to this, three out of ten Android users will encounter a web-based threat on their device this year, according to recent findings from Lookout Mobile Security.
    Survey Finds Smartphone Apps Store Too Much Personal Data | Threat Level | Wired.com

    There is also a new type of attack called the "upgrade attack" whereby hackers get around the scrutiny of newly released apps. What they do is produce a good, functioning app and then later they offer an update. but it is the update that is infected. And since most people set their phones to automatically update, there is less chance of the malware being discovered.

    By the way, I also use an HTC Sensation 4G and find a lot of what the OP stated is true, but for security BB wins.
    11-01-11 01:42 PM
  12. anakin1979's Avatar
    I have over 24 apps installed on my S2 with no signs of malware.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    11-01-11 01:46 PM
  13. elvin1983's Avatar
    It's good that you found a device that works for you where your 9900 did not. That's exactly why the carriers give you a trial period to test out the device. That being said, I will stick with my 9930, since that's what works for me.

    Your review points were nice, but I have to call BS on the battery life point. Can't call it an even tie when you purchased an extended life battery for your GSII and compared it to the standard battery on the Bold.

    Other than that, enjoy the GSII.
    11-01-11 01:51 PM
  14. psufan32's Avatar
    I suppose if you install nothing and don't go anywhere on the Internet then you can't get malware.

    In August 2011, McAfee recently stated that malware for Androids phones jumped 76% since the last quarter which makes it the most heavily attacked mobile OS. McAfee has also found 12 million unique types of malware in the first half of 2011, a 22% increase from a year ago, and expects that by the end of the year they will have 75 million samples of malware in their database


    McAfee says Android plagued by the most malware | Mobile - CNET News

    The Android Market allows anyone to submit any app for download, without it being tested for quality or security. In fact, according to this, three out of ten Android users will encounter a web-based threat on their device this year, according to recent findings from Lookout Mobile Security.
    Survey Finds Smartphone Apps Store Too Much Personal Data | Threat Level | Wired.com

    There is also a new type of attack called the "upgrade attack" whereby hackers get around the scrutiny of newly released apps. What they do is produce a good, functioning app and then later they offer an update. but it is the update that is infected. And since most people set their phones to automatically update, there is less chance of the malware being discovered.

    By the way, I also use an HTC Sensation 4G and find a lot of what the OP stated is true, but for security BB wins.
    Could Google do a better job of vetting apps? Sure, they absolutely could.

    However, everything you've mentioned is pure and simple user error. Those who download random apps and are cruising porn on their mobile devices shouldn't be surprised when they get malware. Every single app that I've ever downloaded has either been a known entity - ESPN, NYTimes, etc. - or has been vetted by 3rd parties and other users (ratings, etc.) - ScoreMobile, GasBuddy, etc.
    11-01-11 01:54 PM
  15. CrackedBarry's Avatar
    You forget about the biggest security related problem of all on Android... Scare-stories from producers of antivirus programs!

    No device is absolutely secure... Blackberry users run as big a risk as anybody for phishing attacks, and given physical access, most Blackberries can be hacked too.

    In the meantime, I and other Android owners sleep safe at night, knowing that:

    A. I've never had a problem, let alone know anybody who ever had a problem. The only major malware attack I remember reading about, was some dodgy apps that infected some Chinese users.

    And B: Just read what permissions the app you download asks for. It's really pretty simple and safe.

    Just like on PCs you just gotta stay away from dodgy apps and pirated programs (heck, even the vast majority of people who DO download cracked apps are fine!) and you'll be fine. If you're the paranoid kind, there's of course always anti virus apps you can download to buy.
    steppinghorse likes this.
    11-01-11 01:56 PM
  16. qingyuank's Avatar
    i'm impressed. my only issue with android is how they get bigger and better so quickly that your device is outdated in a matter of weeks..
    JR A likes this.
    11-01-11 02:03 PM
  17. chunt69's Avatar
    I've gotta say most of your plus points/wins where based on the bigger screen of the galaxy- isn't that pretty obvious before you've even picked it up and used the device? I'm suprised you even considered the 9900 tbh.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    11-01-11 02:07 PM
  18. CrackedBarry's Avatar
    i'm impressed. my only issue with android is how they get bigger and better so quickly that your device is outdated in a matter of weeks..
    Heh, it's all psychological my friend. Let me put it this way... My last Android phone was the HTC Desire. It's close to two years old, but can still keep up with the newest apps and games. It has a 1ghz CPU, and would probably be snappy and adequate for another year or so.

    The SGSII is about six months old, and sure, after the Nexus Prime came out, it's no longer top of the line, but it'll still be fast and able to run pretty much anything the next two years. And run adequately fast for longer than that.

    I'll probably get a new phone next year though, but that's just cause I like to upgrade, not cause its necessary. So yeah, if you go out and get the newest Android phone now, you'll only have bragging rights for 6 months if that much. But you'll have an awesome phone that won't be outdated for much, much longer...
    11-01-11 02:10 PM
  19. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    Heh, it's all psychological my friend. Let me put it this way... My last Android phone was the HTC Desire. It's close to two years old, but can still keep up with the newest apps and games. It has a 1ghz CPU, and would probably be snappy and adequate for another year or so.

    The SGSII is about six months old, and sure, after the Nexus Prime came out, it's no longer top of the line, but it'll still be fast and able to run pretty much anything the next two years. And run adequately fast for longer than that.

    I'll probably get a new phone next year though, but that's just cause I like to upgrade, not cause its necessary. So yeah, if you go out and get the newest Android phone now, you'll only have bragging rights for 6 months if that much. But you'll have an awesome phone that won't be outdated for much, much longer...
    I mostly agree. Not every "new" phone is an upgrade in the Android world. That is mostly true for any platform.

    When you pick a higher end Android device, you are picking a device that will be relevant for quite a while. I'd still put my EOL EVO against just about any device out today. Heck, I'd say the same for the Hero.
    Rickroller likes this.
    11-01-11 02:18 PM
  20. pantlesspenguin's Avatar
    I've gotta say most of your plus points/wins where based on the bigger screen of the galaxy- isn't that pretty obvious before you've even picked it up and used the device? I'm suprised you even considered the 9900 tbh.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Did we read the same post? The OP compared screen, build, camera, PIM, speed, push email, speakerphone, apps, browser, connectivity, battery, and GPS. The ONLY thing the 9900 won was build quality, and they tied on PIM.
    Rickroller likes this.
    11-01-11 02:51 PM
  21. CrackedBarry's Avatar
    And there's of course always the rooted route, if you're so inclined (personally, I'm not...) for upgradebility. Case in point: the HTC HD 2! It's like a three year old (if not older)Windows Mobile phone. It was the first phone with a Snapdragon SOC, and despite it coming with a now extinct OS, it cann, by a miracle of hackery, STILL be upgraded to the newest version of Android.

    Despite costing like 6 or 7 hundred dollars when it came out, that phone still holds the record as best **** gadget buy EVER!
    11-01-11 02:52 PM
  22. rcheung135's Avatar
    The Galaxy S2 set the standard and bar high. Now if only RIM comes out with something with as much impact once the BBX phones come out...
    11-01-11 04:45 PM
  23. chunt69's Avatar
    Did we read the same post? The OP compared screen, build, camera, PIM, speed, push email, speakerphone, apps, browser, connectivity, battery, and GPS. The ONLY thing the 9900 won was build quality, and they tied on PIM.
    Screen, camera, email and browser are all gauranteed to look better on a bigger all touch device.
    Connectivity, battery and gps are all better on later os builds aswell so an operating system update would have helped those areas massively. Compare the 9900 to another qwerty device and see how it fairs is all I'm saying ;-)

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    11-01-11 04:59 PM
  24. Heaterman61's Avatar
    I've been thinking of getting that phone myself. Either that or an ip4s
    11-01-11 06:34 PM
  25. bobauckland's Avatar
    At some point, I had both the 9900 and the GSII as I needed to sell the 9900 to fully switch to Android. Here are some objective observations:

    - Signal Reception: I live in the suburbs and signal from my carrier isn't that strong. On my 9900, I had totally no signal in my room. It would gain one to two bars in the dining room, which was very inconvenient for me. On the GSII, I had three bars in my room and full signal everywhere else. GSII wins here.

    - Screen: The SGII's screen is an AMOLED display, and I have to say that it is truly brilliant and colors are vivid. The 9900 has a good screen as well. However, it is small and inconvenient for browsing full websites. GSII wins here.

    - Build: The 9900 feels more well constructed and feels great in the hand. The GSII is large and VERY VERY surprisingly light. The 9900 has a great physical keyboard, while the GSII is a full touch screen device with one physical home button. 9900 wins here.

    - Camera: The 9900 is a 5 MP camera with no real auto focus. The GSII has an 8 MP camera with true autofocus and takes superior macro shots compared to the blurry ones taken on the 9900. Also, the GSII has a front facing camera for Skype calls. The 9900 takes 720P HD video, while the GSII takes 1080P HD video. Comparing the actual shots taken, the ones from the 9900 looked good, but the GSII videos were still more detailed and superior. GSII wins here.

    - PIM Applications: I'd have to say this is a tie. Both OSs handle the PIM information pretty well.

    - Speed: The 9900 is a 1.2 GHz equipped phone, while the GSII is a dual core 1.2GHz phone. The 9900 does perform more snappily vs it's 9780 predecessor. However, the GSII is way faster at everything. GSII wins.

    - Push E-Mail: I set up five e-mail accounts on my GSII. A bit disappointed it couldn't setup regular Yahoo mail vs BIS which can handle it without problems. However- I preferred the HTML e-mail rendering on the GSII. Push e-mail though, in terms of speed: e-mails came in at the same time on the two devices and on my IMAP personal e-mail, the push e-mails actually came first on the GSII. GSII wins.

    - Speakerphone: My callers had to ask me to speak louder when talking through speakerphone on my 9900 whenever I was driving. On the GSII, not a single complaint. GSII wins.

    - Apps: On my 9900- Facebook, Twitter, Wikitude, Foursquare, Yahoo Messenger, etc. On my GSII- all of the apps that my BB had, plus the ones I had needed for a long time: Shazam (not available on OS7 last time I checked), Google+, Skype (so useful for me with my communication needs for business partners overseas), Kindle (so relieved I am now using this!), Jeannie (the Siri equivalent from iPhone4S), Goggles, Google Sky Map, eBay, Marvel Comic reader, CNN, Flickr, AIM (strangely not available on OS7), iMDB (can someone tell me if they have this on OS7?), oh and I just love the fact that I can now play Angry Birds and Talking Tom!!!! All the apps I downloaded on my GSII were and are free and fully functional. Obviously - GSII wins.

    - Browser: 9900 browser was an improvement, but no Flash. GSII, aside from being faster and snappier, has Flash enabled. Looks heaps better on the larger screen estate. GSII wins.

    - Connectivity: 9900 has the basics and NFC. Though I have yet to find any use for NFC. Also, my WiFi loses connection whenever I am in my garage. The GSII has all the connectivity options from the 9900 sans NFC (but is available in other GSII variations), and can serve as a WiFi hotspot. I heard this will be available for OS7 at some point, but if we are talking about the present, GSII already has it. GSII wins.

    - Battery Life: This is where I was pleasantly surprised, given the reputation that Android devices have on battery life. My 9900 could last me about 18 hours, my GSII did the same! I had push email enabled on the GSII. One thing I have to mention though is that I bought the extended battery that Samsung released for the GSII (2000mh vs the stock 1650mh). This is a tie.

    - GPS: This was a big hit and miss for my 9900. On the GSII, this was fast and always accurate. GSII wins.

    The only things that the GSII lack are the LED indicator and of course, BBM.

    However- given all the points I gave- I have absolutely no regrets moving over to the Galaxy SII and I am totally appreciative of the Android OS.

    I am still waiting for official news from Samsung and Google if Android's latest operating system, Ice Cream Sandwich, will be supported on the GSII. Given though that Samsung always delivers on their statements, if they say that they will support it, I am sure that they will. Something that I can't say about RIM, who has released many misleading timeline announcements.
    Thanks for this post.
    Can you kindly provide me with an Android users forum address so I can register and waste everyones time over there by refusing to post in a separate forum for a different operating system, ignore a specific thread for people moving to other devices, and start a new thread instead, posting about how superior my 9780 is compared to the Galaxy S2?
    Thanks in advance
    luna9698 likes this.
    11-01-11 06:53 PM
66 123
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD