1. Statehouse's Avatar
    Are the 9900 and 9930 considered 4g phones?

    I'm starting to get confused on the generations.
    07-18-11 03:17 PM
  2. greggebhardt's Avatar
    It is more like 3.5G
    07-18-11 03:21 PM
  3. californiablackberry's Avatar
    T-Mobile is advertising it as 4G, but as said above, it's more like 3.5G.
    07-18-11 03:23 PM
  4. Statehouse's Avatar
    Thanks...thats kind of what I figured.
    07-18-11 03:34 PM
  5. dasDestruktion's Avatar
    HSPA+ for capable networks. :/
    We will have "real 4G" though by the time they get released.
    07-18-11 04:09 PM
  6. Mikey112's Avatar
    Once again, T-Mobile says its 9900 will be 4G but the 9930 for Verizon will be 3G. Let's just hope the 9930 runs like a 4G LTE phone.
    07-18-11 04:57 PM
  7. srad711's Avatar
    to my knowledge no one has actually gotten to 4g speeds they are about 3.9g speeds but have been allowed to advertise as 4g due to the fact they are in the "next" generation speeds.

    Anyone can correct me if i am wrong ... but the last time i checked on the whole 3/3.5/4g the data stated the above.
    07-18-11 07:18 PM
  8. Crucial_Xtreme's Avatar
    T-Mobile is full of it. Their HSPA+ network isn't 4G. Only Verizon has true LTE(4G). Yes the 99xx is HSPA+ capable.
    07-18-11 07:23 PM
  9. _StephenBB81's Avatar
    Will be an impressive arena when all the GSM and CDMA carriers in North America get 4G

    Rogers LTE 4G launch has shows some great speeds
    Rogers LTE 4G hands-on: Verizon gets left behind | Electronista

    20.68Mb/s down 4.88Mb/s up with a 47ms ping, that's good enough to play an online game without lag
    07-18-11 07:56 PM
  10. waterfrontmgmt's Avatar
    Will be an impressive arena when all the GSM and CDMA carriers in North America get 4G

    20.68Mb/s down 4.88Mb/s up with a 47ms ping, that's good enough to play an online game without lag
    that's pretty impressive. it will be a game changer eventually. half that speed is fast enough to stream music without any problems. there are two things happening now that i think are going to impact the future of mobile phones and the need for speed on them.

    1) the music industry is quickly moving towards getting mobile phones to be the main source of music (at least for kids and young adults).

    2) there is a worldwide movement to make ISP's accountable for illegal downloading/piracy. It is already in place in France and most of the major countries are working on plans/laws, etc now.

    as piracy (free music) starts to slow down (it will never be completely eliminated) and consumers start moving their music collections, purchases, subscriptions to their mobile phones, it will impact the cellular industry.

    mp3 players and yes, even the ipod will die. apple will have to do more than just 4G to sustain the iphone.

    there will be a point in the near future where phone speed will determine the amount of music you can have on your phone, NOT the size of your memory card. actually its already here.
    07-18-11 09:11 PM
  11. _StephenBB81's Avatar
    that's pretty impressive. it will be a game changer eventually. half that speed is fast enough to stream music without any problems. there are two things happening now that i think are going to impact the future of mobile phones and the need for speed on them.

    1) the music industry is quickly moving towards getting mobile phones to be the main source of music (at least for kids and young adults).

    2) there is a worldwide movement to make ISP's accountable for illegal downloading/piracy. It is already in place in France and most of the major countries are working on plans/laws, etc now.

    as piracy (free music) starts to slow down (it will never be completely eliminated) and consumers start moving their music collections, purchases, subscriptions to their mobile phones, it will impact the cellular industry.

    mp3 players and yes, even the ipod will die. apple will have to do more than just 4G to sustain the iphone.

    there will be a point in the near future where phone speed will determine the amount of music you can have on your phone, NOT the size of your memory card. actually its already here.

    Bandwidth caps will keep this business model from ever happening, continually expanding wired networks allow for far more bandwidth use, but on wireless we have spectrum limitations,

    all the carriers will have a pay for use service as more people start getting smartphones and clogging the networks
    07-18-11 09:50 PM
  12. waterfrontmgmt's Avatar
    The model is happening. Users will balance between what they keep on their device/card, what they stream (listen and leave) and what they use WiFi for.

    Carriers may have bandwidth issues, but the train is rolling already and can't be stopped. Carrier use will also be subsidized via the music industry.
    07-18-11 10:17 PM
  13. _StephenBB81's Avatar
    The model is happening. Users will balance between what they keep on their device/card, what they stream (listen and leave) and what they use WiFi for.

    Carriers may have bandwidth issues, but the train is rolling already and can't be stopped. Carrier use will also be subsidized via the music industry.

    We will see how it moves,
    I have no interest in streaming music, when I need music from my phone, I usually have no signal
    07-18-11 10:27 PM
  14. waterfrontmgmt's Avatar
    We will see how it moves,
    I have no interest in streaming music, when I need music from my phone, I usually have no signal
    The target market, for the most part, are kids in school/college. And you can take music from where you do have a signal/wi-fi and download it to your card. then listen to it later without a signal.

    There are a few phones/subscription services that allow you to do it now. Having a high speed phone (with a signal) allows a person to do that anywhere, or just stream the music.

    As you know, 4G lte is still very new. And Rhapsody and Napster, etc just made agreements with Apple (4th Gen only) to allow their devices to do this.

    Kids are just now starting to figure this out. As piracy slows and subscription grows, it will impact.

    And as I said before, eventually music plans will become part of the carrier's bundled plans they offer...just like they do with text, etc.

    My guess is the GSM version of this new Bold phone will be fast enough for this to be a viable option. Not sure if the 3G version will be, unless it's faster than the 3G vzn has now.

    But my point was that much of the younger market will start to look for phones that also make good music players. I personally think that this new Bold makes for a perfect music player, as far as the hardware and UI. In a way, it combines the old school click wheel of the Ipod (via the track pad) and the new touch screen that the Ipod Touch/Iphone have.

    Where I think RIM will really eventually win is when they get QNX (?) out on entry level phones (ie Curve, etc) with 4G/LTE. AT&T, Vzn, Sprint...will all be making deals with record labels direct, or 3rd parties within the year or so. Rhapsody and Napster are just the beginning.
    07-19-11 10:18 AM
  15. Mamaluka's Avatar
    all the carriers will have a pay for use service as more people start getting smartphones and clogging the networks
    As I read this, I had flashbacks to 1999ish, when I was one of the first people on my block to get cable modem. The speeds were insane for the first year or so. When I left for VZ DSL, the Time Warner internet pipe I had was so clogged that internet was unbearable to use.
    I hope it never gets like that.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    07-19-11 10:32 AM
  16. greggebhardt's Avatar
    To avoid this, I believe that the carriers will start charging for bandwidth in the near future. This will be the only way to control it and keep the net viable.
    07-19-11 03:47 PM
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