03-22-17 08:53 PM
137 12345 ...
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  1. conite's Avatar
    An android runtime registering an intent. Haha you mean running a process in the background but calling it a different name lol. Hmm

    Posted via CB10
    Not the same thing at all. It just means that when the Android Runtime receives an intent or notification from the outside world, it knows what to do with it. It has nothing to do with nor requires running apps or services in the background.
    Last edited by conite; 03-09-17 at 02:40 PM.
    03-09-17 02:29 PM
  2. ryder55's Avatar
    Not the same thing at all. It just means that when the Android Runtime receives an intent or notification from the outside world, it knows what to do with it. It has nothing to do with nor requires running apps or services in the background.
    It doesn't receive an intent from the outside world, I set my k9 to sync every thirty minutes. And no, that's not how runtimes work at all.

    Posted via CB10
    03-09-17 02:45 PM
  3. The_Passporter's Avatar
    Not the same thing at all. It just means that when the Android Runtime receives an intent or notification from the outside world, it knows what to do with it. It has nothing to do with nor requires running apps or services in the background.
    You can use whatever jargon you choose but the fact remains the same system resources are being used that includes ram, processor and battery. If you want to dissect it to decide how much of each however insignificant or not they are being used. When they activate they cause a disruption in other running apps so call it what you choose, a process or whatever it's using system resources.

    Posted via CB10
    03-09-17 02:49 PM
  4. conite's Avatar
    It doesn't receive an intent from the outside world, I set my k9 to sync every thirty minutes. And no, that's not how runtimes work at all.

    Posted via CB10
    Missed comma. The notification is from the outside world.

    The fact is, the app or service doesn't run between intent servicing. Since the Android Runtime is running anyway, this saves a lot of battery. This has always been a desirable feature of BB10. I thought you would be all over it, as a big fan.

    Anyway, I'm done. Believe me, Cobalt, and BlackBerry, or don't.
    ominaxe likes this.
    03-09-17 02:56 PM
  5. ryder55's Avatar
    You can use whatever jargon you choose but the fact remains the same system resources are being used that includes ram, processor and battery. If you want to dissect it to decide how much of each however insignificant or not they are being used. When they activate they cause a disruption in other running apps so call it what you choose, a process or whatever it's using system resources.

    Posted via CB10
    im not even sure what hes talking about, theres no intent that can run without a process thread using system resources. He totally misunderstood what blackberry meant by apps not running in the background. doesnt mean they dont have active processes still kept in the system.

    Posted via the CrackBerry App for Android
    03-09-17 02:57 PM
  6. ryder55's Avatar
    Missed comma. The notification is from the outside world.

    The fact is, the app or service doesn't run between intent servicing. Since the Android Runtime is running anyway, this saves a lot of battery. This has always been a desirable feature of BB10. I thought you would be all over it, as a big fan.

    Anyway, I'm done. Believe me, Cobalt, and BlackBerry, or don't.
    hmm.

    Posted via the CrackBerry App for Android
    03-09-17 02:58 PM
  7. Emaderton3's Avatar
    So is it possible Android apps could possibly triggering the runtime at a high rate causing battery drain?

    Posted via CB10
    03-09-17 07:15 PM
  8. conite's Avatar
    So is it possible Android apps could possibly triggering the runtime at a high rate causing battery drain?

    Posted via CB10
    An extremely poorly coded app could, in theory.

    DTEK60 / Z30
    ominaxe likes this.
    03-09-17 07:17 PM
  9. Thud Hardsmack's Avatar
    My degree isn't in software or engineering and even I can understand what conite is saying. App giving intent to the runtime and the runtime getting notifications from the outside world is as simple as "Hey Joe I'm going on break, call me if something happens. Oh and I need to check mail every half hour" "Hey Frank - it's been 30 minutes, go check your mail"
    ominaxe likes this.
    03-09-17 07:49 PM
  10. ominaxe's Avatar
    My degree isn't in software or engineering and even I can understand what conite is saying. App giving intent to the runtime and the runtime getting notifications from the outside world is as simple as "Hey Joe I'm going on break, call me if something happens. Oh and I need to check mail every half hour" "Hey Frank - it's been 30 minutes, go check your mail"
    I think what that Passporter guy is trying to ask is if Frank is punched out or getting a paid break.

    This whole argument sounds like s Schrodinger's cat scenario. When closing an app, is the process dead or alive? It's really a matter of perception really. If you want to find out that answer, it requires you to check, meaning you nullify your answer. The process is both dead and alive.

    Now I wanna go read some Philip K. ****. Anyone down for a 'Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?' book circle?
    Last edited by ominaxe; 03-09-17 at 08:38 PM.
    03-09-17 08:16 PM
  11. Thud Hardsmack's Avatar
    I think what that Passporter guy is trying to ask is if Frank is punched out or getting a paid break.

    This whole argument sounds like s Schrodinger's cat scenario. When closing an app, is the process dead or alive? It's really a matter of perception really. If you want to find out that answer, it requires you to check, meaning you nullify your answer. The process is both dead and alive.

    Now I wanna go read some Philip K. ****. Anyone down for a 'Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?' book circle?
    Actually you bring up something I mentioned earlier - force closing is Frank getting punched out, takes a lot more to get him back up and running vs leaving him alone to do his own thing, going to break and returning at the proper time.
    03-09-17 09:15 PM
  12. ryder55's Avatar
    My degree isn't in software or engineering and even I can understand what conite is saying. App giving intent to the runtime and the runtime getting notifications from the outside world is as simple as "Hey Joe I'm going on break, call me if something happens. Oh and I need to check mail every half hour" "Hey Frank - it's been 30 minutes, go check your mail"
    Well I don't know what you're understanding but you cannot have an intent without a continuing process activity simple. It's the process thread that relays the information of the intent and that's what constitutes a background activity. This is very basic knowledge and the throwing of names like cobalt, or whatever doesn't mean a thing. Conite is right in a way but also wrong in saying all process threads die whenever the user exits from the app. This is wrong as what passporter and I are saying is there are apps that still continue to communicate with and run strings in the background which is why apps like greenify Work on the passport. We can agree to disagree.

    "An intent is an abstract description of an operation to be performed. It can be used with startActivity to launch an Activity, broadcastIntent to send it to any interested BroadcastReceiver components, and startService(Intent) or bindService(Intent, ServiceConnection, int) to communicate with a background Service." android developers.

    Posted via CB10
    Last edited by ryder55; 03-09-17 at 11:21 PM.
    The_Passporter likes this.
    03-09-17 11:04 PM
  13. Thud Hardsmack's Avatar
    Well I don't know what you're understanding but you cannot have an intent without a continuing process activity simple. It's the process thread that relays the information of the intent and that's what constitutes a background activity. This is very basic knowledge and the throwing of names like cobalt, or whatever doesn't mean a thing.

    "An intent is an abstract description of an operation to be performed. It can be used with startActivity to launch an Activity, broadcastIntent to send it to any interested BroadcastReceiver components, and startService(Intent) or bindService(Intent, ServiceConnection, int) to communicate with a background Service." android developers.

    Posted via CB10
    Exactly. And then the system puts the process on standby/sleep.
    03-09-17 11:06 PM
  14. ryder55's Avatar
    Exactly. And then the system puts the process on standby/sleep.
    In most cases most process threads are force closed when the user leaves the app depending. Not 100 percent of the time.

    Posted via CB10
    The_Passporter likes this.
    03-09-17 11:16 PM
  15. ominaxe's Avatar
    So why does Facebook seem to drain battery more than others? (I don't have Android, just what I heard). Bad programming?
    03-10-17 01:13 AM
  16. Thud Hardsmack's Avatar
    Because they tried to launch a phone and it failed miserably, so they've settled on hijacking the one you have. We've seen a few threads here where users have reported their devices suffering from the fallout of installing their software.
    03-10-17 01:53 AM
  17. Thud Hardsmack's Avatar
    In most cases most process threads are force closed when the user leaves the app depending. Not 100 percent of the time.

    Posted via CB10
    In BB10 yes, in Android no; the system will try to keep them in RAM to lessen load and update times. BB10 native software does better from a cold start, while Android is smarter about what's getting priority to stay loaded in RAM.
    03-10-17 01:57 AM
  18. ryder55's Avatar
    So why does Facebook seem to drain battery more than others? (I don't have Android, just what I heard). Bad programming?
    Facebook is full of permissions and receivers. Always use apk permission pro to monitor and modify any app before or after you install because Google no longer shows all the permissions an app requests. I had an app with a permission to scan my emails and this wasn't on the install notification. This just reduces the integrity of Android.
    The_Passporter likes this.
    03-10-17 01:59 AM
  19. The_Passporter's Avatar
    Ok so today the LG-G3 has been rebooted, all the manufacturer apps and the Google Apps have been re-enabled again.

    As far as app not remaining Force Stopped we have this list to share:


    Just going through the apps. GoPro Capture keeps starting at some point.
    Google drive
    Built in Email app
    Evernote
    Google Fit
    Google Opinion Rewards
    Google Maps
    Built in messaging app
    FB Messenger
    Built in Music app
    BB Password Keeper
    Skype
    Built in Tasks app
    Twitter
    YouTube
    Allo
    Under Armor Record
    Chrome
    Facebook
    Play store
    Google+

    Note: after 5hrs down to 30% battery.

    Many of these don't need to take up RAM or resources and or battery. Even if the % of battery is minimal with all the apps that want to run the total % is still greater than necessary and unwarranted. I would like to know if the DTEK60 has any advantage in keeping apps closed with the DTEK app. If not I suspect I may be considering a flagship phone that I could ROOT for my future transition phone.

    Distant future!!!


    Posted via CB10
    03-10-17 06:21 AM
  20. conite's Avatar

    Many of these don't need to take up RAM or resources and or battery. Even if the % of battery is minimal with all the apps that want to run the total % is still greater than necessary and unwarranted.

    Posted via CB10
    You're trying to fight the very nature of Android. Apps are designed to run services in the background, and memory management is very good on Android.

    Having a big battery, and QC3 charging, is the real solution. 20 minutes on QC3 in the late afternoon (in the car, or sitting at your desk), brings the battery from 30% back up to over 70%.
    03-10-17 06:36 AM
  21. BigBadWulf's Avatar
    Wow, what a long debate, about something in my experience is unnecessary. Your friend must have one, or a few apps that are being battery hogs, and should be able to be identified, either through the battery monitor, or process of elimination.

    I have 107 apps registered in Google Play, and 141 apps overall installed. I don't have any services shut off, don't use battery saver, nor a task manager, no apps disabled or forced closed, and drain while idle is <1% per hour. I looked at my system, and 78 apps used memory in the last day. I'm willing to bet Facebook is the biggest issue, and one I don't have installed. Maybe the LG skin is part of their problem, maybe it's not on Nougat yet and that's part of the problem. Were I in their shoes, I'd uninstall Facebook and see what change resulted over a day.
    03-10-17 07:42 AM
  22. The_Passporter's Avatar
    You're trying to fight the very nature of Android. Apps are designed to run services in the background, and memory management is very good on Android.

    Having a big battery, and QC3 charging, is the real solution. 20 minutes on QC3 in the late afternoon (in the car, or sitting at your desk), brings the battery from 30% back up to over 70%.
    Ok to entertain what your saying about QC3 charging, having to do that two or three times a day would definitely shorten the cycles in battery life would it not? If my Passport lasts all day everyday then technically my battery will survive long no?

    Posted via CB10
    03-10-17 07:55 AM
  23. BigBadWulf's Avatar
    Ok to entertain what your saying about QC3 charging, having to do that two or three times a day would definitely shorten the cycles in battery life would it not? If my Passport lasts all day everyday then technically my battery will survive long no?

    Posted via CB10
    And switching to a feature phone would result in charging only weekly.
    03-10-17 08:01 AM
  24. The_Passporter's Avatar
    And switching to a feature phone would result in charging only weekly.
    And switching to an Android phone that is an advertising device that includes a phone will leave you charging hourly....


    Posted via CB10
    03-10-17 08:06 AM
  25. conite's Avatar
    Ok to entertain what your saying about QC3 charging, having to do that two or three times a day would definitely shorten the cycles in battery life would it not? If my Passport lasts all day everyday then technically my battery will survive long no?

    Posted via CB10
    Lithium Ion batteries operate best when kept between 50 and 80%. Hitting it with small charges throughout the day keeps the battery much healthier than plugging it in at the end of the day.

    http://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/...hones-battery/
    Thud Hardsmack likes this.
    03-10-17 08:13 AM
137 12345 ...

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