01-11-18 09:26 PM
354 ... 45678 ...
tools
  1. Drael646464's Avatar
    Yeah, Samsung is trying with its android fork DeX.

    With windows they aren't supporting a third ecosystem. The iOS and Android porting software, makes porting a breeze (not 50% more work, but more like 1-5%). And the desktop and tablet platform have over 200,000 active devices, tablets being the fastest growing tablet sector. So for windows, its not only possible to close the app gap, its pretty much inevitable. If you've been into the windows store in the last little while and compared it to two years ago, that's pretty obvious. Windows store used to be like BBW.

    You can't really compare windows 10, to Blackberry. Windows 10 is a popular operating system that is still very much on the uptake (50% of desktop users are win 7, 25% are win10 - so over time the win10 desktop users will triple, and you can guarantee the tablet segment will go up too). So, it does not at all depend on mobile market share for app development.

    I think there are lots of ways the current smartphone duopology can be challenged. For one, we are mere years away from negative growth, so the premium market will basically die. And in pricepoint competition, like IBM before them, the big boys will find themselves surrounded by swarths of competitors.

    Microsoft and Samsungs flexible OLED screen will change the game. When people can fold out their phone into a tablet, that'll be the hot new thing, and people on the outside of that will suffer. Like apple.

    Conversational and more human platforms will also replace both manual search engine enquiries, and the touch dominant market we see today. Given iOS and Android both only excel at touch platforms, a sufficient conversational platform (such as the one Microsoft just started working on with skype chatbots under Cortana, and its language AI acquisitions) could easily kill both operating systems, and the search giant google.

    Although not to be too heavy on my love of microsofts new direction, its future mindedness, google also has made several AI acquisitions.

    And theirs other smart devices. Watches, jewelry and so on. Augmented reality, virtual reality. The internet of things. Microsoft in fact, is the only one trying to write an OS that runs on all of it. Google for example has several separate OSs. Probably a dozen if you count all the multitasking platforms, google home, smartwear etc etc. Same with apple, loads of different, separately coded systems. And none of those systems are built for compatibility really with other device ecosystems or app ecosystems either. Very much, not future minded IMO. Although perhaps google and apple are both doing these things in secret, even if they are, they are already behind.

    I am pretty sure when the tech is scaled well enough, a lot of people will move to smaller objects. Between that and the fold out OLED screens, and the emerging conversational platform, its only a matter of time before current Android and iOS, and current smartphone forms, are basically redundant. And yes, even google could be replaced.

    Imagine if the power of app information databases was harnessed into a truly intelligent conversational platform. The search engine it uses from there, would only have to be semi-decent to outstrip google.

    Basically where smartphones now, is like the hayday of IBM. Like the height of windows. Just before market started to slump, and a few years before the release of the iPhone.

    It won't last. The only question is not if it ends, but when, and how will apple and google cope. Samsung, being in the game with OLED, they are not really in question IMO.

    For laptops, well OS wise, recently chromebooks have taken much of the budget sector. Something Windows 10 hopes to address with its arm emu.

    Nothing in technology is static. What more or less happens is people get real excited at first, then everyone has one, they get a bit bored by it. They start spending less money on it, then something else comes along, some paradigm changer, and they all start buying that. A tech company is only ontop of that so long as it gambles on the right technologies.

    It repeats over and over again. Desktop PCs. Feature phones. PDAs. Blackberry, nokia. IBM, tablets, the surface, the iPhone. We could probably use examples like CRT TVs, transistor radios, the incandescent light bulb.

    You know at one point iOS was the most popular mobile OS. Right now its the most popular tablet OS, but that's bound to change. Last year was one of samsungs worst for ages, most likely due to the 6% growth we saw.

    I'm waiting for the 0% growth year. Should be this or next. After that its negative. People will be surprised and shocked as apple and Samsung grapple to adapt, and fall out of favour, in favour of cheaper products and a more diverse market. But any tech, or business analyst can see it from a mile away.

    They'll be equally shocked when Samsung and Microsoft, say five or six years from now, release the flexible oled screen - and because they have the patent, apple is left looking old fashioned. But none of this is rocket science, its all happened before with prior products, and all the future techs are being developed now. Although which ones exactly end up being more dominant we will see.

    For a good hint at where the future will likely go, check out the movie "her". They use gestures and 3d more than screens, and voice especially. People don't wander around looking at screens, they wander around walking to their AI.
    04-04-17 11:26 PM
  2. conite's Avatar
    I think there are lots of ways the current smartphone duopology can be challenged.
    We probably won't be alive to see it.

    As Android has surpassed Windows as the most deployed OS in the world (with Windows on a steep decline and Android on a steep rise), it will remain the dominant OS for years and years to come.

    The barriers to entry are too high. It's tough to compete with an OS that is given away for free, that has a huge, innovative development team, and that has a unmatched ecosystem - apps, wearables, gadgets and gizmos.
    BigBadWulf and Troy Tiscareno like this.
    04-04-17 11:38 PM
  3. Drael646464's Avatar
    We probably won't be alive to see it.

    As Android has surpassed Windows as the most deployed OS in the world (with Windows on a steep decline and Android on a steep rise), it will remain the dominant OS for years and years to come.

    The barriers to entry are too high. It's tough to compete with an OS that is given away for free, that has a huge, innovative development team, and that has a unmatched ecosystem - apps, wearables, gadgets and gizmos.
    I'll definitely be alive. Things move fast in tech. The iPhone, the thing that kicked this all off, was released 10 years ago, in 2007. The first Samsung galaxy was released 8 years ago in 2009.

    Google started in September 2008, 19 years ago.

    I could imagine someone saying in 2006 "No one will ever challenge windows, they have too much market dominance, too much software". I think just before manned flight was invented people were saying "it's impossible for a human to fly"

    I've long enough to know that this stuff isn't remotely stable. It only takes the next big thing to take off, and a little interest to wane in the existing thing. For me, I don't find anything google is doing these days particularly, exciting, nor apple. I'm pretty sure in five to ten years time, this current stuff will all be considered pretty boring. In twenty years time, it will seem like an IBM mainframe.

    Just consider the ecosystem your speaking of, more or less rose in eight or nine years or so. I'm certainly living another ten years.
    04-05-17 12:13 AM
  4. thurask's Avatar
    I could imagine someone saying in 2006 "No one will ever challenge windows, they have too much market dominance, too much software".
    And yet...

    Or is 2017 the year of the Linux desktop?
    BigBadWulf likes this.
    04-05-17 12:16 AM
  5. Drael646464's Avatar
    And yet...

    Or is 2017 the year of the Linux desktop?
    OSX is at 11%. You think people would have guessed that back when apple was nearly bust? Plus, more people own smartphones than desktops (ironically, most running Linux), a market that came into being over the last ten years only.
    04-05-17 12:19 AM
  6. Drael646464's Avatar
    Are you guys old enough to remember when apple was nearly bust, and when google wasn't a popular search engine?
    When people didn't even have smartphones?
    When desktop PCs were the "cool thing to have"?
    When windows hadn't taken off?

    When someone invents AI, whoever it is - you think they will take second place to android smartphones? What about the winner of immersive VR? When smartwatches are powerful enough to replace phones? When phones can be folder out like tablets - will regular smartphones still be the hottest thing?

    I mean this market is going to slump, for sure, in less than 2 years, lol. Technology advances aside, based on pure economics.

    Short sighted..
    04-05-17 12:23 AM
  7. conite's Avatar

    Just consider the ecosystem your speaking of, more or less rose in eight or nine years or so. I'm certainly living another ten years.
    Yes, 10 years ago saw the birth of mobile hand-held smart technology. Now the dust has settled and the winners have been crowned.

    Until the next disruption occurs to replace it (computer chips in the brain?), I see a lengthy status quo. Much the same as Microsoft Windows and Mac OS over the last 20 years on desktops.
    BigBadWulf likes this.
    04-05-17 12:33 AM
  8. Drael646464's Avatar
    Yes, 10 years ago saw the birth of mobile hand-held smart technology. Now the dust has settled and the winners have been crowned.

    Until the next disruption occurs to replace it (computer chips in the brain?), I see a lengthy status quo. Much the same as Microsoft Windows and Mac OS over the last 20 years on desktops.
    Well, ten year before that the internet took off. And the mobile phone took off. Laptops. Before that the desktop computer. TV. Radio. Manufacturing. The car. We haven't really been through any ten year period in the last 100 without some major technological cultural shift. To me, its very hard for me to imagine that suddenly grinding to a halt.

    But okay, we can agree to disagree. At least its a polite exchange
    04-05-17 12:46 AM
  9. bb10adopter111's Avatar
    We probably won't be alive to see it.

    As Android has surpassed Windows as the most deployed OS in the world (with Windows on a steep decline and Android on a steep rise), it will remain the dominant OS for years and years to come.

    The barriers to entry are too high. It's tough to compete with an OS that is given away for free, that has a huge, innovative development team, and that has a unmatched ecosystem - apps, wearables, gadgets and gizmos.
    A direct comparison between Android and Windows is a bit specious. There is still a night and day difference between PC and mobile requirements, and the total number of Windows installations has not declined dramatically. The chart you posted reflects the growth of mobile, where win32/64 could not really compete due to hardware limitations. In the same way, Android is nowhere near to being able to compete with Windows/Linux in terms of security models, peripherals, and availability of serious software applications.

    IMHO, it's a false comparison.

    The chart reflects 1B new Android users, but many of them are simply consumers and may not even be computer literate.

    I don't want to understate the scale of the disruption that mobile is creating. As voice assistants improve, we will continue to see mobile "thin" OSes like Android, combined with
    cloud-based processing, displace many traditional PC-based tasks for consumers, but when it comes to networks and Enterprise, peripherals, large and arrayed displays, not to mention the "serious" software applications used for engineering, content creation, and many other real-world tasks that actually create value, Microsoft has forgotten more than the Android team at Google has dreamt of.

    My point is that Android v. Windows is apples v. oranges, and in a world of convergence, I can make as good a case for Windows displacing iOS/Android as I can for the opposite case.

    Posted with my trusty Z10
    Drael646464 likes this.
    04-05-17 09:10 AM
  10. conite's Avatar
    A direct comparison between Android and Windows is a bit specious.
    The thrust of my argument was that Android isn't going to be displaced anytime soon.
    04-05-17 09:33 AM
  11. Drael646464's Avatar
    The chart you posted reflects the growth of mobile, where win32/64 could not really compete due to hardware limitations
    That's changing. Hardware is getting up to windows spec, and win32 is coming to mobile soon. Still, perhaps most users won't be interested in that power, as you say, non-computer literate people with quite simple needs.

    But I think as big a factor, actually is the size of the screen. I might want to play console games on a big screen, even a tablet, but I lose all interest when the screen goes below eight or nine inches. Same with other serious applications.

    The smart phone at its size becomes this fiddly, quick fix device. Platform games, candy crush, facebook and quick emails. Not a place to read novels, write music, or take in a movie.

    Probably the next major "zenith" will be not voice, ai, gestures or VR, but folding screens. When those screens get bigger, in smaller sizes in the pocket, as most tablet users moan about the simplicity of mobile software (and they do, hence tablet editions of software, and demand for increased complexity), perhaps most users will start to find the offerings a little simple too.

    And at that point, with something closer to an actual PC in your pocket, maybe running android will start to feel more like owning a chromebook. Limited.
    04-05-17 09:43 AM
  12. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    not sure about the 1st sentence: BB has no debt until those guys showed up.
    as for microsoft, the bad taste of nokia still long lasting. I don't think they are going to buy BB, unless to find a way to drive down the price, send a ceo over?
    The debt is to Prem/Fairfax who did this for income and creditor protection ahead of shareholders. Without that money, BlackBerry wouldn't be here right now.

    Posted via CB10
    Troy Tiscareno likes this.
    04-05-17 11:00 AM
  13. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    Blackberry ownership has not changed. The company is a publicly traded company.
    Prem/Fairfax has effective control of the company through BlackBerry debt that he owns which is senior to any common shareholders. How do you think he was able to demand Chen be hired as CEO?

    Posted via CB10
    04-05-17 11:03 AM
  14. bb10adopter111's Avatar
    The thrust of my argument was that Android isn't going to be displaced anytime soon.
    Agreed. More than iOS, Android is here to stay. But so is Windows. Microsoft is firing on all cylinders and its product lineup is the best it's been since the release of XP.

    Android could make a great thin client OS if Google really wants to make the investment. Not to be skeptical, but it seems like, whenever Google has to make a major investment decision to compete head to head with Microsoft for the desktop, they balk.

    Posted with my trusty Z10
    04-05-17 11:31 AM
  15. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    That's changing. Hardware is getting up to windows spec, and win32 is coming to mobile soon. Still, perhaps most users won't be interested in that power, as you say, non-computer literate people with quite simple needs.
    I follow tech - mobile tech especially - and I understand everything you're saying. The problem with all of it is that MS has spent the last 20 years making big promises and predictions about mobile - I can't count the times MS has announced that they've got a solid plan and would soon rule the space - only to fall flat on their face. By every rationale, MS should OWN the mobile space - mobile was Bill Gates' #1 aspiration for a decade, from long before hardware was viable - but MS did an absolutely terrible job with mobile at every stage of the game, and they've changed direction so many times that there is massive developer fatigue with WinMo.

    Also, you've said several times that porting apps from Android or iOS to Windows is fairly simple - and you aren't wrong - EXCEPT all you end up with is an app that looks like an Android or iOS app that runs (more or less well) on Win10. That app doesn't have the look and feel of a Windows app - it will look and feel very out of place on that platform, and that's simply not acceptable to either developers or customers. Sure, it might help a solo developer who just needs to get an app on the platform with minimal effort, but no sizable company that cares about their reputation or user experience will go for that. Instead, they have to decide whether it's worth it to write a native app from scratch, or should they just pass on the platform altogether. A whole lot have decided to do the latter, and that's one of the main reasons why WinMo's marketshare is disappearing.

    Is it possible that MS is going to finally get mobile right? Sure, it's possible. Is it likely? IMO, no - and I'm exactly the type of person who would be most likely to adopt it if its promises were actually realized.

    For that reason, I strongly recommend that people take a "wait and see" attitude and that they buy products based on what they do on that day, and NOT based on promises of what they'll do SOMEDAY. BB folks especially should be familiar with the reality that the "someday" may never come.
    04-05-17 11:39 AM
  16. stlabrat's Avatar
    Prem/Fairfax has effective control of the company through BlackBerry debt that he owns which is senior to any common shareholders. How do you think he was able to demand Chen be hired as CEO?

    Posted via CB10
    without that, we might get Mike L's pocket money and still has hardware. - no body knows. By the way, what ever the cheap handset appear to be in trouble. LeEco delay employee salaries... https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...-u-s-employees
    04-05-17 11:54 AM
  17. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    without that, we might get Mike L's pocket money and still has hardware. - no body knows. By the way, what ever the cheap handset appear to be in trouble. LeEco delay employee salaries... https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...-u-s-employees
    Mike L won't even mention BlackBerry. He's one who took money and left. He knew the future of BlackBerry and left. He's no Steve Jobs coming back to save his Apple.

    Posted via CB10
    04-05-17 01:00 PM
  18. stlabrat's Avatar
    Mike L won't even mention BlackBerry. He's one who took money and left. He knew the future of BlackBerry and left. He's no Steve Jobs coming back to save his Apple.

    Posted via CB10
    Not true. Thorsten took 10 million and hand over to others:
    BlackBerry co-founders Mike Lazaridis, Doug Fregin mull bid for company - Business - CBC News
    04-05-17 01:06 PM
  19. bb10adopter111's Avatar
    I follow tech - mobile tech especially - and I understand everything you're saying. The problem with all of it is that MS has spent the last 20 years making big promises and predictions about mobile - I can't count the times MS has announced that they've got a solid plan and would soon rule the space - only to fall flat on their face. By every rationale, MS should OWN the mobile space - mobile was Bill Gates' #1 aspiration for a decade, from long before hardware was viable - but MS did an absolutely terrible job with mobile at every stage of the game, and they've changed direction so many times that there is massive developer fatigue with WinMo.

    Also, you've said several times that porting apps from Android or iOS to Windows is fairly simple - and you aren't wrong - EXCEPT all you end up with is an app that looks like an Android or iOS app that runs (more or less well) on Win10. That app doesn't have the look and feel of a Windows app - it will look and feel very out of place on that platform, and that's simply not acceptable to either developers or customers. Sure, it might help a solo developer who just needs to get an app on the platform with minimal effort, but no sizable company that cares about their reputation or user experience will go for that. Instead, they have to decide whether it's worth it to write a native app from scratch, or should they just pass on the platform altogether. A whole lot have decided to do the latter, and that's one of the main reasons why WinMo's marketshare is disappearing.

    Is it possible that MS is going to finally get mobile right? Sure, it's possible. Is it likely? IMO, no - and I'm exactly the type of person who would be most likely to adopt it if its promises were actually realized.

    For that reason, I strongly recommend that people take a "wait and see" attitude and that they buy products based on what they do on that day, and NOT based on promises of what they'll do SOMEDAY. BB folks especially should be familiar with the reality that the "someday" may never come.
    I think there is zero chance that Microsoft pursues the mass mobile market for one simple reason: not enough money in it for them. The return on investment in consumer mobile isn't worth the risk.

    However, if you step up to an enterprise-grade phablet at Surface-type $1k-2k prices that combines "always on" connectivity with normal 2-in-1 benefits and which, docked, is a full-featured laptop, the equation changes. There are lots of indications that, in the next 2-3 years, we will see Microsoft make a major play for the enterprise mobile and prosumer market with such a device.

    If corporate users begin to adopt a Surface type mobile device, the major apps (banking, travel, etc) will port their apps to Windows Universal pretty quickly, as those are the most profitable customers. We won't see 1M apps, but we all know most of those are cr4p, anyway.

    If I could downsize to a single always on device for work/mobile, it would be a no-brainer for 90% of my time.

    Posted with my trusty Z10
    Drael646464 likes this.
    04-05-17 01:21 PM
  20. co4nd's Avatar
    Win 10 mobile gets a big update this year. The UI is being improved, and the capacity to run win32 software is being added. The emulation operating system will also run unmodified on any ARM chip with drivers for the hardware. Making it as easy to implement, cheap and low in power consumption as android devices.

    The focus will mainly be on cheap laptops with the EMU, but Redmond 3 should deliver what you want, and I'd say next year big OEMs like Samsung etc will be making ARM windows mobiles.

    The full desktop power user applications on your PC, on your phone. Whether they will run/scale well on a small screen IDK, guess it depends on the application specifically, and how its layed out.

    Obviously currently most win32s don't scale natively. Some do, but many don't. And obviously that will change over the coming years.

    You could always just get a windows tablet, or hybrid.
    Except what Microsoft actually delivers never lives up to the hype.
    Elephant_Canyon likes this.
    04-05-17 04:39 PM
  21. Drael646464's Avatar
    I can't count the times MS has announced that they've got a solid plan and would soon rule the space - only to fall flat on their face. By every rationale, MS should OWN the mobile space - mobile was Bill Gates' #1 aspiration for a decade, from long before hardware was viable - but MS did an absolutely terrible job with mobile at every stage of the game, and they've changed direction so many times that there is massive developer fatigue with WinMo.

    Also, you've said several times that porting apps from Android or iOS to Windows is fairly simple - and you aren't wrong - EXCEPT all you end up with is an app that looks like an Android or iOS app that runs (more or less well) on Win10. That app doesn't have the look and feel of a Windows app - it will look and feel very out of place on that platform, and that's simply not acceptable to either developers or customers. Sure, it might help a solo developer who just needs to get an app on the platform with minimal effort, but no sizable company that cares about their reputation or user experience will go for that. Instead, they have to decide whether it's worth it to write a native app from scratch, or should they just pass on the platform altogether. A whole lot have decided to do the latter, and that's one of the main reasons why WinMo's marketshare is disappearing.
    Those are all fair comments. Admitedly, none of the failed promises you speak of occurred under the current CEO.

    And often apps don't need changes. There are a number of games that have been directly ported from android or ios with no or little modification. Apps too. Often apps have 'their own look'.

    And the app store is growing. Really fast. I'm sure its more than doubled in size in two years. Probably tripled. Plus for developers its not just some small third mobile platform. Its the thing a quarter of desktops are running, and an increasing number of tablets. At least for big developers, even a decent amount of time spent makes sense.

    I think the main reason windows marketshare of mobile has recently sunk (really only the last year or two mainly), is because they specifically abandoned nokia, the route of being a hardware company, and focused primarily on tablets and desktops for the first two years of windows 10 release.

    They intentionally, and justifiably focused on other things. And its paid off. Fastest growing tablet segment (when android is shrinking - understandable IMO, iOS has the slight edge software wise, and you feel that software quality more on a tablet), and fastest desktop windows adoption ever....

    Now that may be harsh to phone consumers, but I am sure anyone can see it makes business sense. Phones will likely eventually become tablets anyway. And its not on those tiny screens where people crave the sort of power, for gaming or tools Microsoft excels in. On tiny screens low rent software makes more sense.

    The current windows phone market is more geared towards the prosumer. And I am sure they will be pretty happy with the arm win32 emu, seeing as desktop software has a power a) they want b) only windows will be able to provide.

    I get that windows mobile users might be peeved. But commercially win mobile isn't an attempt to win total market hardware dominance anymore. Its a software project that is a small part of the greater windows 10 on any device plan. But they do have plans that very much include mobile, wearables and more. They've demo'd the emu, and plenty of windows insiders have used the creators update. So, we know, for sure, this year huge updates are coming.

    You can't really expect win32 to run well on an old nokia with 1gb of ram. You shouldn't reasonably expect a phone without the right connectivity could do continuum. So of course, those early models are a little underspec for everything that's coming. Old Samsung users won't be getting the update to android 7.0 either.

    Perhaps, when tablet sized screens fold into the pocket, regular folk will start to crave that power and depth. Maybe they'll want to play modern warfare instead of candy crush. Or run a full browser rather than a slim version of one.

    Its all commerce in the end anyway. Not friendship.

    If your a prosumer, and want a conventional slab type device the wait and see shouldn't be long. Creators update is probably this month, Redmond 3 late this year.

    Trial yourself an Idol 4S or HP elite x3 running that, when Redmond 3 comes out, or watch some reviews (techaltar is excellent, thorough, OS agnostic), and you'll have a good idea what the promise delivery is.

    There's UI updates and win32. Both of those will be more than interesting to see in action.
    Last edited by Drael646464; 04-06-17 at 04:52 AM.
    04-06-17 04:37 AM
  22. i_plod_an_dr_void's Avatar
    Maybe the question should be, would existing BB10 users pay for annual software upgrades via Blackberry World to keep developing/supporting/porting apps to/and securing bb10 (ala microsoft office subscriptions)....say $10/$20 dollars per year per device.
    Only Blackberry knows this answer...based on how many active devices they have. Since they are an acclaimed software-company now...this would dovetail nicely into their focus, and QNX progress.

    With sufficient explanation on push-notifications and in BBworld. Don't know if locked-devices would have the capability or if they are carrier tied to be able to this sort of thing, with or without the carriers co-operation.

    Then if sufficient revenues are obtained to continue supporting the platform...another device could be in the works.
    04-09-17 12:27 AM
  23. i_plod_an_dr_void's Avatar
    ....those who don't pay don't get "features" of an upgrade, and maybe a few upgrade notification reminders per month.
    04-09-17 12:29 AM
  24. i_plod_an_dr_void's Avatar
    ...if they can profitablely grow the bb10 biosphere ...then a new phone might be quite reasonable down the road, not to mention the synergies with the flip side of the company in its qnx advancements.
    04-09-17 12:32 AM
  25. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    Maybe the question should be, would existing BB10 users pay for annual software upgrades via Blackberry World to keep developing/supporting/porting apps to/and securing bb10 (ala microsoft office subscriptions)....say $10/$20 dollars per year per device.
    Only Blackberry knows this answer...based on how many active devices they have. Since they are an acclaimed software-company now...this would dovetail nicely into their focus, and QNX progress.

    With sufficient explanation on push-notifications and in BBworld. Don't know if locked-devices would have the capability or if they are carrier tied to be able to this sort of thing, with or without the carriers co-operation.

    Then if sufficient revenues are obtained to continue supporting the platform...another device could be in the works.
    Please read some of the other threads. Your numbers are so far off reality that it's laughable.

    BB10 hasn't been developed for 2.5 years already. It was never converted to 64-bit (a conversion that is no longer optional, as the world has transitioned), it is using an old, unsupported version of QT, it has limited APIs (nothing new since 2013), the development tools are way out of date, and many other problems. To fix that would take a big development team (2000 people at least) a minimum of 2 years to complete. To put it in perspective, it has taken BB over a year just to update from Android 6 to Android 7 and it's still delayed the rollout of the KeyOne, and that's a tiny job compared to what BB10 needs.

    It would cost at least a billion dollars, over 2 years, to pay for all of the necessary development. How many people would pay for this update? Consider that if you could get 100,000 people to pay, they would each need to pay $10,000. If you could get 500,000 people to pay, it would only cost $2000 each.

    Remember, that's just to update BB10 for the existing hardware. New devices would add to the software cost, plus the cost of hardware itself.

    BB users won't pay $12/year for secure BBM. There's no way they'd be willing to pay for what it would cost to update BB10.
    04-09-17 01:46 AM
354 ... 45678 ...

Similar Threads

  1. The $49 that saved my life
    By john_v in forum Rehab & Off-Topic Lounge
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 05-17-17, 10:45 PM
  2. Iphone 7 plus to KeyOne BUT can I Really make the jump
    By Graham Ireland in forum BlackBerry KEYone
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: 05-17-17, 03:43 AM
  3. Unable to disengage do not disturb function
    By CrackBerry Question in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-01-17, 05:09 PM
  4. PSA: Official @BlackBerry Support Forums now closed and directing users to @CrackBerry
    By CrackBerry News in forum CrackBerry.com News Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-01-17, 03:10 PM
  5. WhatsApp ver 2.11.116 for blackberry
    By vivekjhavar in forum BlackBerry Curve 9370/9360/9350
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-01-17, 08:41 AM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD