02-17-18 07:44 PM
433 123 ...
tools
  1. dthoupis's Avatar
    Just to state it I absolutely love BlackBerry brand and have used devices from OS 5 through to BB10. I even have a Playbook so my opinion is not to bash but to make some constructive criticism. Although we would never know now, it wasn't the brand or the marketing which also affected BB10 but it was mainly the APP gap as people prefer a simple getitall. I am very well aware that you can get almost any app working with the Android runtime BUT here is the thing. I believe that the first thing which started kicking the bucket was the inclusion of Android runtime itself! Let me explain.... after BlackBerry introduced the Android apps using Amazon store, developers just stopped caring about making any native apps. Why did BBOS had much more apps which worked with very little glitches? Because devs were "forced" in doing them. By opening the Android runtime on BB10, BlackBerry shot themselves in the head. Although at the time it may had sounded like a good idea to bridge the app gap, it really was the first nail on the coffin for BB10. At least that is my opinion. I really dread the day I will be forced to swap to Android (Mercury would be my first device) since I really prefer the touch of buttons and can't handle never any virtual keyboard no matter who is making it. Is really amazing how they haven't yet managed to put the "peek and flow" function on the android. I doubt it would be that difficult for BlackBerry to develop it into the Android OS! They did it from scratch for BB10! I really wish the best for the company. I love my Classic and wouldn't change it for any other device. It makes me productive all day long and I really appreciate how much thought was given into it. I am a bit saddened that the trackpad dissapears completely but what can we do.

    What do you people think?

    Posted via CB10
    Bonnie Bonzai and jmzed like this.
    02-01-17 05:45 PM
  2. thurask's Avatar
    As I see it, BlackBerry's device strategy was a continuous stream of too little too late, before during and after BB10's time in the sun.

    And as for the Android player, you might want to note that it first appeared in PlayBook OS 2.0 (October 2011), well before BB10 launch.
    02-01-17 06:03 PM
  3. d987654321's Avatar
    Here we go with another one of THESE threads
    02-01-17 06:06 PM
  4. DrBoomBotz's Avatar
    I believe that the first thing which started kicking the bucket was the inclusion of Android runtime itself! Let me explain.... after BlackBerry introduced the Android apps using Amazon store, developers just stopped caring about making any native apps.
    You have it backwards, the Amazon store was introduced because of the low number of native apps being developed and the low number of android apps being repackaged for BlackBerry World.
    Playbook had an Android runtime and BB10 had an Android runtime from launch.
    eshropshire and Mecca EL like this.
    02-01-17 06:07 PM
  5. JuiciPatties's Avatar
    i was thinking the same thing. There are so many threads and opinions on why BlackBerry 10 failed. It ranges from lack of marketing, lack of apps, lack of commitment, lack of management attention, too little too late ... etc.
    02-01-17 06:09 PM
  6. Denise in Los Angeles's Avatar
    Smartphone users want the "real" "popular" apps that are available on Android and iPhones. The few that bought a BB10 device soon found out that they would not have the apps they need.

    I remember seeing the tech reporter on the morning news doing a review of the Z10. He looked extremely bored, and said that you could not get apps like Netflix, Gmail, Youtube, or other name apps. There were lots of native apps, but not the ones customers use on a daily basis.

    Then, after the launch, customers were having technical issues, such as overheating, blue screen of death, and rebooting. Many carriers stopped recommending BlackBerry phones to customers, and actively tried to discourage that anyone buy one. Remember the T-Mobile negative campaign "Trade in your BlackBerry for an iPhone!!"? Well, there was a mad rush to take advantage of the deal, as they gave a $250 discount on an iPhone at that time.

    Native apps would NEVER have mad a difference, as the major apps were not going to be on BB10.
    02-01-17 06:16 PM
  7. Nguyen1's Avatar
    For me, and my family, and my relatives, and my friends, all of them, the reason bb10 failed is simple - nobody ever heard of it. Or even knew BlackBerry phones were around.

    I only stumbled upon BlackBerry purely by chance when researching another phone half a year ago on amazon. By chance, amazon also suggested I look at passport (huh? What's that? Oh well, I'll take a look...).

    And to date, I remain the ONLY person I know who has heard of or uses a BlackBerry.

    And that, my comrades, demonstrates an utter failure to communicate. By BlackBerry. Through the magic of marketing. Or lack thereof.

    The Guide is definitive. Reality is frequently inaccurate.
    02-01-17 06:25 PM
  8. Denise in Los Angeles's Avatar
    For me, and my family, and my relatives, and my friends, all of them, the reason bb10 failed is simple - nobody ever heard of it. Or even knew BlackBerry phones were around.

    I only stumbled upon BlackBerry purely by chance when researching another phone half a year ago on amazon. By chance, amazon also suggested I look at passport (huh? What's that? Oh well, I'll take a look...).

    And to date, I remain the ONLY person I know who has heard of or uses a BlackBerry.

    And that, my comrades, demonstrates an utter failure to communicate. By BlackBerry. Through the magic of marketing. Or lack thereof.

    The Guide is definitive. Reality is frequently inaccurate.
    Tell us!!!! Really, tell us... how would you market the Z10. It has zero popular apps, overheats, gets blue screen of death, and reboots about 100 times a day.
    Edit: HORRIBLE battery life too. You need to buy a external battery to make it through the day!!!

    If you have a great marketing campaign that would have worked in 2013, tell us. Back then in 2013, there were ads, even if you and your family never saw them.

    BlackBerry has been struggling to not go out of business since 2013, and probably spends very little on marketing nowadays. Think target marketing to their former and current customers via email, and Twitter/Facebook stuff that is not very costly.
    02-01-17 06:36 PM
  9. markmall's Avatar
    We have argued about this until the cows come home. A few of us including myself believe that poor marketing and mixed messages by management killed BB10. The app gap did not doom BB10 as a matter of certainty. But the fact that very few knew (or know now) that BB10 existed or the superior quality of its hardware existed made it impossible for BB10 to succeed. The app gap might have been beyond the control of management but the nonexistent marketing was not.

    Posted via CB10
    jmzed likes this.
    02-01-17 06:36 PM
  10. Denise in Los Angeles's Avatar
    There was marketing. Google BlackBerry 10 ads.
    Laura Knotek and BigBadWulf like this.
    02-01-17 06:39 PM
  11. markmall's Avatar
    For me, and my family, and my relatives, and my friends, all of them, the reason bb10 failed is simple - nobody ever heard of it. Or even knew BlackBerry phones were around.

    I only stumbled upon BlackBerry purely by chance when researching another phone half a year ago on amazon. By chance, amazon also suggested I look at passport (huh? What's that? Oh well, I'll take a look...).

    And to date, I remain the ONLY person I know who has heard of or uses a BlackBerry.

    And that, my comrades, demonstrates an utter failure to communicate. By BlackBerry. Through the magic of marketing. Or lack thereof.

    The Guide is definitive. Reality is frequently inaccurate.
    No one here can come to terms that you can't sell to people when they don't know you exist. They think the world studies CNET every morning.

    Posted via CB10
    02-01-17 06:41 PM
  12. conite's Avatar
    We have argued about this until the cows come home. A few of us including myself believe that poor marketing and mixed messages by management killed BB10. The app gap did not doom BB10 as a matter of certainty. But the fact that very few knew (or know now) that BB10 existed or the superior quality of its hardware existed made it impossible for BB10 to succeed. The app gap might have been beyond the control of management but the nonexistent marketing was not.

    Posted via CB10
    At a minimum, the 80 million BBOS users knew about it. They all went to Android and iOS anyway.

    How would YOU have marketed a product with essentially no ecosystem, so-so specs, and an OS with a large learning curve?
    02-01-17 06:43 PM
  13. markmall's Avatar
    Tell us!!!! Really, tell us... how would you market the Z10. It has zero popular apps, overheats, gets blue screen of death, and reboots about 100 times a day.
    Edit: HORRIBLE battery life too. You need to buy a external battery to make it through the day!!!

    If you have a great marketing campaign that would have worked in 2013, tell us. Back then in 2013, there were ads, even if you and your family never saw them.

    BlackBerry has been struggling to not go out of business since 2013, and probably spends very little on marketing nowadays. Think target marketing to their former and current customers via email, and Twitter/Facebook stuff that is not very costly.
    The Z10 was only the first release. Yes, spending on marketing like anything has financial risk but doing nothing means that you will fail for certain.

    Posted via CB10
    02-01-17 06:44 PM
  14. Denise in Los Angeles's Avatar
    The Z10 was only the first release. Yes, spending on marketing like anything has financial risk but doing nothing means that you will fail for certain.

    Posted via CB10
    BB10 failed in 2013. It had nothing that over 99% of the smartphone customer base wanted to buy, and marketing would never change that.

    Please, if you were doing the marketing for the Z10, what specific feature would a customer not find in iPhone or Samsung?
    StephanieMaks and BigBadWulf like this.
    02-01-17 06:49 PM
  15. conite's Avatar
    The Z10 was only the first release. Yes, spending on marketing like anything has financial risk but doing nothing means that you will fail for certain.

    Posted via CB10
    After the first 6 months, there was NO uptake by developers for major apps. That was the nail in the coffin. Hence why BlackBerry went up for sale.
    02-01-17 06:50 PM
  16. markmall's Avatar
    At a minimum, the 80 million BBOS users knew about it. They all went to Android and iOS anyway.

    How would YOU have marketed a product with essentially no ecosystem, so-so specs, and an OS with a large learning curve?
    Again, you post "facts" that are really your speculation. You have no idea whether 80 million BlackBerry users -- especially those issued their devices before BYOD policies -- ever heard of BB10 or saw a BB10 device. The fact that BlackBerry sent them a spam email means nothing. The fact that BlackBerry might (emphasis: might) have targeted them with cheap banner ads means nothing.

    I would bet that if you asked people today that used BBOS devices in 2012 or 2013 if they knew anything about BB10 or its hardware, they would smile and say, "Blackberry? They went out of business about five years ago. I read about it in the news."

    Posted via CB10
    Last edited by markmall; 02-01-17 at 07:09 PM.
    elfabio80 and jmzed like this.
    02-01-17 06:55 PM
  17. thurask's Avatar
    I would bet that if you asked people that used BB10 devices in 2012 if they knew anything about BB10 or its hardware, they would smile and say, "Blackberry? They went out of business about five years ago. I read about it in the news."
    No, they'd know, since they'd be employees if they were using it before release.
    02-01-17 06:58 PM
  18. Denise in Los Angeles's Avatar
    Is it just me, or do we never hear the great marketing idea that would have saved BB10? Is that marketing idea just a myth that keeps getting brought up on CB?
    02-01-17 07:02 PM
  19. markmall's Avatar
    No, they'd know, since they'd be employees if they were using it before release.
    I meant used BBOS devices. Typo. What was the launch year? 2013?

    Posted via CB10
    02-01-17 07:08 PM
  20. thurask's Avatar
    Is it just me, or do we never hear the great marketing idea that would have saved BB10? Is that marketing idea just a myth that keeps getting brought up on CB?
    There are countless ideas being tossed around in Armchair CEO, but whether they're great is the question.

    But since nobody can travel back in time to early 2013 (or even before that) and implement these ideas back when there was a hint of relevance to the platform they're all speculative fiction.
    02-01-17 07:10 PM
  21. Denise in Los Angeles's Avatar
    I meant used BBOS devices. Typo. What was the launch year? 2013?

    Posted via CB10
    Google it. I know because I was here.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    02-01-17 07:10 PM
  22. markmall's Avatar
    Is it just me, or do we never hear the great marketing idea that would have saved BB10? Is that marketing idea just a myth that keeps getting brought up on CB?
    There is a whole industry that does this sort of thing. It's been around for decades. There was a TV show about it set in the 1960s.

    Posted via CB10
    02-01-17 07:10 PM
  23. meattray's Avatar
    I would have to think it's the app ecosystem that ultimately did it in.

    You can't ask people to learn a new os plus have no apps for it afterwards. Plus they were likely a little late on it.

    I am thinking of most of my family and they don't want to go to any extra efforts to get apps on their system. They just want it to be as easy and possible and just work.

    Posted via CB10
    02-01-17 07:13 PM
  24. Denise in Los Angeles's Avatar
    I would have to think it's the app ecosystem that ultimately did it in.

    You can't ask people to learn a new os plus have no apps for it afterwards. Plus they were likely a little late on it.

    I am thinking of most of my family and they don't want to go to any extra efforts to get apps on their system. They just want it to be as easy and possible and just work.

    Posted via CB10
    Yes, people want Instagram or Candy Crush or Netflix, without having to learn how to sideload apps, or use Cobalt's method. Customers want the 'NAME' apps in their own app store.
    Laura Knotek and ubizmo like this.
    02-01-17 07:21 PM
  25. Denise in Los Angeles's Avatar
    Again, you post "facts" that are really your speculation.

    Posted via CB10
    Very ironic that you consider your opinion not speculative. Although you feel that marketing could have saved BB10, you cannot offer any real proof of how.
    02-01-17 07:38 PM
433 123 ...

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11-29-17, 10:46 AM
  2. Replies: 61
    Last Post: 07-07-17, 10:45 AM
  3. How to back up contacts on bb10
    By K Ts in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 05-10-17, 08:51 PM
  4. Why is blackberry not recommended for countries other than the US, UK and CANADA?
    By Sand_rina4 in forum General BlackBerry Discussion
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 02-03-17, 10:06 PM
  5. I dont know why my phone stop receiving text messages
    By CrackBerry Question in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-01-17, 12:31 AM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD