08-12-15 12:07 PM
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  1. Malazm's Avatar
    I keep reading / hearing how superior BlackBerry security is. Then why is it that IT Depts are not interested in BlackBerry? In fact our IT Dept is discouraging the use of BlackBerry.

    Posted via CB10
    08-02-15 01:41 PM
  2. paulwallace1234's Avatar
    They aren't the 'trend' maybe?
    08-02-15 02:18 PM
  3. The_Passporter's Avatar
    I would think the reason is that even IT professionals enjoy their phones and most people have moved from BlackBerry to more entertaining devices like Android and iPoop lol. All platforms have some form of security so in essence they have justified having security and still enjoy their play time on their toys. In the end they are no more protected then SONY was and may find themselves in a tight place explaining to their boss why they've had a breach.
    BlackBerry is the best option at the moment for mobile networking and until proven otherwise don't believe the naysayers. I put my faith in BlackBerry and obviously Android seems to have the same opinion since they are talking to BlackBerry about a phone.

    Posted via CB10
    08-02-15 02:23 PM
  4. beowulf101's Avatar
    EMM and MDM solutions cover most brands of handsets and operating systems. There is a misconception that BlackBerry security is about the handsets, when it's truly about policy pushed from its BES platform, which for the main part is also handset agnostic and will apply security and workspaces to Apple, Android and BlackBerry as well as Windows. Some MDM go further and will include OS platforms like Chromebook, Windows, OSX etc, even being able to pull off screen shots of what the user is looking at and what apps they installed and when, as well as which ones are currently running.

    Forget the idea of security being about handsets, it's just not relevant in enterprise.

    Posted via CB10
    08-02-15 02:24 PM
  5. The_Passporter's Avatar
    What he said ^

    But they may be using other networking security options is what I meant.

    Posted via CB10
    08-02-15 02:46 PM
  6. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    I would think the reason is that even IT professionals enjoy their phones and most people have moved from BlackBerry to more entertaining devices like Android and iPoop lol. All platforms have some form of security so in essence they have justified having security and still enjoy their play time on their toys. In the end they are no more protected then SONY was and may find themselves in a tight place explaining to their boss why they've had a breach.
    BlackBerry is the best option at the moment for mobile networking and until proven otherwise don't believe the naysayers. I put my faith in BlackBerry and obviously Android seems to have the same opinion since they are talking to BlackBerry about a phone.

    Posted via CB10
    Sony didn't suffer a mobile breach. Using BB10 would not have prevented what happened to Sony.

    I don't think Android is "talking to BBRY about a phone," either, and I would caution putting one's faith in a for-profit entity.
    08-02-15 03:27 PM
  7. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    EMM and MDM solutions cover most brands of handsets and operating systems. There is a misconception that BlackBerry security is about the handsets, when it's truly about policy pushed from its BES platform, which for the main part is also handset agnostic and will apply security and workspaces to Apple, Android and BlackBerry as well as Windows. Some MDM go further and will include OS platforms like Chromebook, Windows, OSX etc, even being able to pull off screen shots of what the user is looking at and what apps they installed and when, as well as which ones are currently running.

    Forget the idea of security being about handsets, it's just not relevant in enterprise.

    Posted via CB10
    I think BBRY's push to provide cross-platform enterprise services is prescient.
    08-02-15 03:29 PM
  8. beowulf101's Avatar
    @Tre - it's where they need to be, definitely. BlackBerry security services need to be endpoint agnostic, and they are. With additional services and suites to select from, it can be powerful when combined with other security solutions. Also, allowing services like SecuSuite be available without BES is also critical.

    The security market goes into MPLS for dispersed companies, NAC, how to apply policy and check devices at the network edge, gateway level vendors like Palo Alto, Checkpoint and Fortinet, the WLAN and how each SSID and VLAN is configured and on and on and on and on. It's more than just BlackBerry and phones - it's so far removed from an argument about a single phone OS that I'm often staggered at the comments about phones and handsets on these forums. The consumer IT / shadow IT understanding can only be addressed by education - but that's why IT professionals take years to get the qualifications they need, in the areas that they need and why they have the jobs that they do.

    BlackBerry will make progress with the purchases they've made, but the ideas about BlackBerry security being the best depends on whether or not it's a fit for the business looking for a solution to suit their needs. Most security deployments are hybrid solution deployments with 2+ vendors.

    I do wish that this forum would calm down on the phone talk and confusing it with security all the time. The phones are a small part of a very, very large picture.

    Posted via CB10
    08-02-15 03:50 PM
  9. dom7's Avatar
    Nice response beowolf.... I wouldn't mind hearing your insight more often. Even for many of us "tech savvy " people, we don't realize how much is involved with phones and security.

    Posted via CB10
    08-02-15 04:24 PM
  10. The_Passporter's Avatar
    Sony didn't suffer a mobile breach. Using BB10 would not have prevented what happened to Sony.

    I don't think Android is "talking to BBRY about a phone," either, and I would caution putting one's faith in a for-profit entity.
    Ok well here are some quotes so just so you know I'm not arguing with any of you. But Bloomberg is and other sources.

    "The hackers erased Sonys servers and computer hard drives after pilfering the data, leaving nothing working, from email to internal phone systems, directly affecting some 6,000 people."

    "Using the legacy BlackBerry Internet Service (BIS) and BlackBerry Enterprise Service (BES) architecture, Sony was able to get its email up and running, away from the further compromise by the hackers because BIS and BES use stand-alone infrastructure."

    Its proven that BlackBerry devices and the server are a lot more secure than any other solutions out there commercially available, Chen said in a CNBC interview Dec. 19."

    As for Google talking to BlackBerry? Ok sorry BlackBerry is talking to Google my bad.


    Posted via CB10
    08-02-15 05:23 PM
  11. ZeroBarrier's Avatar
    EMM and MDM solutions cover most brands of handsets and operating systems. There is a misconception that BlackBerry security is about the handsets, when it's truly about policy pushed from its BES platform, which for the main part is also handset agnostic and will apply security and workspaces to Apple, Android and BlackBerry as well as Windows. Some MDM go further and will include OS platforms like Chromebook, Windows, OSX etc, even being able to pull off screen shots of what the user is looking at and what apps they installed and when, as well as which ones are currently running.

    Forget the idea of security being about handsets, it's just not relevant in enterprise.

    Posted via CB10
    In theory you are correct, in practice however it's completely different. Having a handset that can be hacked/rooted and/or otherwise allow running a custom ROM/OS much like Android can skirt around any IT policies put in place.

    For example, Exchange Active Sync with password/pin lock enforced can be bypassed on Android by using Enhanced Email app that was specifically designed in it's inception to bypass pin lock requirements set forth by IT policies.

    A handset that's allowed to run custom ROMS and/or apps will always be the weakest link in the chain of security. This is were BlackBerry truly shines, as no one has ever been able to run any custom ROM/OS on the handsets due to BlackBerry requiring the OS to be signed by them and only them.

    Posted via CB10
    D.Vader and johnnyuk like this.
    08-02-15 05:27 PM
  12. beowulf101's Avatar
    I disagree, and several MDM platforms alert to rooted and jailbroken devices, including Meraki's free <100 user platform.

    Posted via CB10
    08-02-15 05:37 PM
  13. beowulf101's Avatar
    And on that note, I'm going to bed. Happy to post the Meraki screenshot tomorrow showing the rooted and jailbroken status and it's denial to such devices.

    Posted via CB10
    08-02-15 05:39 PM
  14. Bluenoser63's Avatar
    I keep reading / hearing how superior BlackBerry security is. Then why is it that IT Depts are not interested in BlackBerry? In fact our IT Dept is discouraging the use of BlackBerry.

    Posted via CB10
    Ask them why they are discouraging using BlackBerry.
    08-02-15 06:46 PM
  15. nhanken's Avatar
    Is it just me who thinks beowulf101 is talking more and more like the Albert Einstein of technology LoL?


    @Tre - it's where they need to be, definitely. BlackBerry security services need to be endpoint agnostic, and they are. With additional services and suites to select from, it can be powerful when combined with other security solutions. Also, allowing services like SecuSuite be available without BES is also critical.

    The security market goes into MPLS for dispersed companies, NAC, how to apply policy and check devices at the network edge, gateway level vendors like Palo Alto, Checkpoint and Fortinet, the WLAN and how each SSID and VLAN is configured and on and on and on and on. It's more than just BlackBerry and phones - it's so far removed from an argument about a single phone OS that I'm often staggered at the comments about phones and handsets on these forums. The consumer IT / shadow IT understanding can only be addressed by education - but that's why IT professionals take years to get the qualifications they need, in the areas that they need and why they have the jobs that they do.

    BlackBerry will make progress with the purchases they've made, but the ideas about BlackBerry security being the best depends on whether or not it's a fit for the business looking for a solution to suit their needs. Most security deployments are hybrid solution deployments with 2+ vendors.

    I do wish that this forum would calm down on the phone talk and confusing it with security all the time. The phones are a small part of a very, very large picture.

    Posted via CB10


    To BB or not to BBBBBB...?
    08-02-15 08:33 PM
  16. beowulf101's Avatar
    What's all this about BlackBerry security-meraki-1.jpgWhat's all this about BlackBerry security-meraki-2.jpgWhat's all this about BlackBerry security-meraki-3.jpgWhat's all this about BlackBerry security-meraki-4.jpg

    Okay, as promised: Screen shots from one page of the Meraki MDM platform.

    You can see IMEI, whether the device in encrypted, rooted, jailbroken, version, LAN and public IP, all apps installed, send messages to the device, in the case of laptops and desktop OS you can use CLI, remote desktop, see preferred SSID's, swap files and other utilisation, installed programmes etc. I can push apps to mobiles and delete them, track location, geo-fence devices and also control them from an OS level. I don't want you reading porn books off of Amazon? No problem. I want to recognise and kick off non-complaint devices? No problem. Can I see if there are security protocols, software and threats? Yes. TCP connections, routing tables and TCP stats? Yes.

    Just scratching the surface. If I want to know what time you arrive in an area and what time you leave, you'd better believe I can see it.

    The devices are just 'endpoints'. This is a little fraction of what MDM comes down to - and as some of you will see. it has BB devices, Android, iOS and Windows in here. I've filed off and wiped out parts of images with information not for public disclosure, but this should give a small insight into why business and enterprise Admins are far more concerned with the overall visibility, management and security of an estate in a complete picture than just a few phones. This doesn't even touch on gateway level security, other forms of authentication (Cisco ISE is very nice with other end-to-end elements it offers in its overall architectures).

    All I can say is, BlackBerry security just isn't what the general public perception of it is - ie, something in the phone itself. There are good market choices in cryptography, and other elements to security that need to be pieced together (mentioned in a previous response, not repeating).

    The truth is that BlackBerry security IS good - but large businesses need to evaluate everything they already have in place, what their workers roles entail, how they want to administer, how the end users want the experience to look and also what level of protection in both communications and endpoints they are happy to accept. That will be the driving factor in choice, alongside cost based analysis.

    Sorry for the long winded post, however it's becoming increasingly clear that the further BlackBerry moves into its software based space, the more CrackBerry users are being left behind in what it actually means and how it works - I hope that this post is educational and gives additional insights into what BlackBerry is trying to achieve, and what its competition offers in this space.
    08-03-15 05:16 AM
  17. The_Passporter's Avatar
    Not really. If your point was to show how BlackBerry compares you should have compared, not only shown what you can do and see with what you use and do. I will take Chen's word on security until I see opposing proof in the news about any security exploits.

    I suppose since NATO is using BES10 it should be top of the line and most trusted. I suppose trusted could be a factor as well.

    http://m.crackberry.com/blackberry-1...communications

    Posted via CB10
    08-03-15 07:03 AM
  18. beowulf101's Avatar
    Well, that made me laugh out loud, I really don't need to say anything, I'll just let your comment and it's lack of understanding say it for me just as the Sony comeback did. There is quite an inherent gap between what I wrote and your response - quite enormous actually.

    Posted via CB10
    08-03-15 07:21 AM
  19. The_Passporter's Avatar
    Sweet thanks I am glad I could help

    And my friends said I wasn't SMRT ha ha on D'em!

    Posted via CB10
    08-03-15 07:38 AM
  20. Madhuchandran's Avatar
    BlackBerry has never been an entertainer. You said it. But for a handful of BlackBerry fanatics including me, people look for more than business in their phones.

    Posted via CB10
    08-03-15 08:58 AM
  21. Malazm's Avatar
    After all the discussion, I'm still at a loss why certain IT Depts are discouraging the use of BlackBerry. It's like a fleet manager who is responsible to buy vehicles for a construction company deciding that everyone should get SUVs because it's more versatile than a 2ton truck. You can lug construction materials during the week and on weekends you can go dune bashing and offloading and really show off. See the SUV is really better because it is much more entertaining. To hell with what the company really needs for its business.
    I'm not talking about the guy who goes out to get a phone (SUV) for personal use, I'm talking about the IT professional who recommends that the company should get 4x4 iPhone SUV instead of 2 ton BlackBerry.

    Posted via CB10
    miker476 likes this.
    08-03-15 09:08 AM
  22. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    After all the discussion, I'm still at a loss why certain IT Depts are discouraging the use of BlackBerry. It's like a fleet manager who is responsible to buy vehicles for a construction company deciding that everyone should get SUVs because it's more versatile than a 2ton truck. You can lug construction materials during the week and on weekends you can go dune bashing and offloading and really show off. See the SUV is really better because it is much more entertaining. To hell with what the company really needs for its business.
    I'm not talking about the guy who goes out to get a phone (SUV) for personal use, I'm talking about the IT professional who recommends that the company should get 4x4 iPhone SUV instead of 2 ton BlackBerry.

    Posted via CB10
    I hate car analogies, but what if the SUV could haul just as much stuff, be managed the same way and could be procured from more sources? Then add in customization possibilities, familiarity and potentially happier drivers.

    Some might wonder if the two pound truck maker will remain in business.
    JanuarJaguar and kbz1960 like this.
    08-03-15 09:25 AM
  23. beowulf101's Avatar
    http://forums.crackberry.com/showthread.php?t=1025874

    I didn't go with BlackBerry because of the issues I came across in this thread.

    If you're IT department has existing technology, MDM that doesn't support the BB10 OS or any other number of factors, they would all be valid reasons. I've tried to highlight how deep the decisions or security go, and how they're typically a multi vendor and multi technology implementation, and I'm afraid unless we're all speaking the same language, know the actual market spaces and vendors and what they supply, then I'm afraid I may as well be talking particle physics to you. I don't mean that in a bad way, but the gulf of information can't be bridged in a CrackBerry thread, it's just to much to understand and take in.

    I recommend Eli the Computer guy on YouTube - some okay into videos on networks, MPLS, security, Linux and more.

    Shift the discussion away from telephones and you'll find your answers.

    Posted via CB10
    Bishkin likes this.
    08-03-15 09:48 AM
  24. The_Passporter's Avatar
    Sounds like you made your decision based on a marketing response or lack there of. I was hoping to see reasons based on technical advantages or disadvantages. You still have not proven BlackBerry to be the lesser there of the options available in other spaces.
    I may not be at your level of expertise but I do understand quite a bit. The person (OP) asked what the deal is about BlackBerry and it's security and I assume he means in comparison to other options out there. If you care to explain in layman terms I'm sure your higher intellect won't be tarnished much.

    Posted via CB10
    Last edited by The_Passporter; 08-03-15 at 07:58 PM.
    08-03-15 06:47 PM
  25. Bishkin's Avatar
    After all the discussion, I'm still at a loss why certain IT Depts are discouraging the use of BlackBerry. It's like a fleet manager who is responsible to buy vehicles for a construction company deciding that everyone should get SUVs because it's more versatile than a 2ton truck. You can lug construction materials during the week and on weekends you can go dune bashing and offloading and really show off. See the SUV is really better because it is much more entertaining. To hell with what the company really needs for its business.
    I'm not talking about the guy who goes out to get a phone (SUV) for personal use, I'm talking about the IT professional who recommends that the company should get 4x4 iPhone SUV instead of 2 ton BlackBerry.

    Posted via CB10
    There is nothing wrong with that SUV or that 2 ton truck, either one will do just fine. Guess what happened to the rest of the world.
    08-04-15 12:23 AM
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