12-13-15 03:01 AM
97 ... 234
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  1. Dave Bourque's Avatar
    https://www.reddit.com/r/blackberry/...ng_qnx_kernel/

    I'm not expert with this things, if BlackBerry android really running this can it be root?
    If it's a BlackBerry and they still care about security no it can't.

    Z30STA100-5/10.3.2.2339
    08-30-15 11:50 PM
  2. kgbbz10's Avatar
    http://researchcenter.paloaltonetwor...ee-app-utopia/

    This is what happens to Apple users that jailbreak (root) their iPhones. If this is so easy on IOS I can't even begin to think how bad it is on a rooted Android.

    BBClassic10.3.2.2639
    09-01-15 09:44 PM
  3. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    http://researchcenter.paloaltonetwor...ee-app-utopia/

    This is what happens to Apple users that jailbreak (root) their iPhones. If this is so easy on IOS I can't even begin to think how bad it is on a rooted Android.

    BBClassic10.3.2.2639
    Nah, different pulls.

    I believe the draw for this is/was free apps. Wouldn't be as much of a pull on Android for obvious reasons.

    But yes... this is pretty horrific.

    If I did have a jbed iPhone, it wouldn't have hit me from what I understand.
    09-01-15 10:23 PM
  4. kgbbz10's Avatar
    I think you missed the point of this. This malware was accidentally found and had been out there for awhile. How many others are out that haven't been found. The point is these only affect rooted users and never could harm a non rooted phone.

    BBClassic10.3.2.2639
    09-02-15 07:34 AM
  5. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    I think you missed the point of this. This malware was accidentally found and had been out there for awhile. How many others are out that haven't been found. The point is these only affect rooted users and never could harm a non rooted phone.
    True, that does give me pause. Still, it wouldn't have affected my mythical jbed iOS device.
    09-02-15 10:25 AM
  6. anon(8063781)'s Avatar
    KeyRaider: iOS Malware Steals Over 225,000 Apple Accounts to Create Free App Utopia - Palo Alto Networks BlogPalo Alto Networks Blog

    This is what happens to Apple users that jailbreak (root) their iPhones. If this is so easy on IOS I can't even begin to think how bad it is on a rooted Android.

    BBClassic10.3.2.2639
    I think the real problem here is that people were using a jailbreak to install unknown third-party software. That's made possible by jailbreaking an iPhone, but it's possible to install malicious third-party apps (via sideload/download) on Android and BlackBerry without jailbreak/root. I think third-party android apps are pretty well sandboxed on BlackBerry, but you could probably give them permissions that would allow them to steal data, and do it without root.

    To beat a dead horse again, in the Linux model I was discussing at the start of all of this, you can use and then log out of your root account, effectively "turning off" root (and in fact, no one ever uses root except to make specific administrative changes). I didn't mention that Linux distributions also maintain their own trusted software repositories (the equivalent of an app store), and you usually never go beyond those repositories for software. If you do, you're taking your security into your own hands, just like when you sideload or download apps from untrusted sources on a phone.

    So, in my opinion, this is an app problem, not a root problem. But I do understand that in a corporate/government environment, administrators just don't want users to have that level (root) of control, ever, and it makes sense to me. I still see no problem in having a proper 'root/regular user' account system on my personal device.
    09-02-15 10:42 AM
  7. Richard Buckley's Avatar
    I think the real problem here is that people were using a jailbreak to install unknown third-party software. That's made possible by jailbreaking an iPhone, but it's possible to install malicious third-party apps (via sideload/download) on Android and BlackBerry without jailbreak/root. I think third-party android apps are pretty well sandboxed on BlackBerry, but you could probably give them permissions that would allow them to steal data, and do it without root.

    To beat a dead horse again, in the Linux model I was discussing at the start of all of this, you can use and then log out of your root account, effectively "turning off" root (and in fact, no one ever uses root except to make specific administrative changes). I didn't mention that Linux distributions also maintain their own trusted software repositories (the equivalent of an app store), and you usually never go beyond those repositories for software. If you do, you're taking your security into your own hands, just like when you sideload or download apps from untrusted sources on a phone.

    So, in my opinion, this is an app problem, not a root problem. But I do understand that in a corporate/government environment, administrators just don't want users to have that level (root) of control, ever, and it makes sense to me. I still see no problem in having a proper 'root/regular user' account system on my personal device.
    There was, however, a couple of years ago a virus that attacked only jail broken iOS devices. I don't know if this article refers to that or not. It doesn't really matter. You have some hackers that find a way to get root access on the device, then modify it so the user can get root access when they want. It is a huge leap of faith that they won't leave a bug behind that is later discovered by maleware authors and exploited.

    Z10STL100-3/10.3.2.2252 SR 10.3.2.2168
    09-02-15 12:47 PM
  8. BCITMike's Avatar
    I think the real problem here is that people were using a jailbreak to install unknown third-party software. That's made possible by jailbreaking an iPhone, but it's possible to install malicious third-party apps (via sideload/download) on Android and BlackBerry without jailbreak/root. I think third-party android apps are pretty well sandboxed on BlackBerry, but you could probably give them permissions that would allow them to steal data, and do it without root.

    To beat a dead horse again, in the Linux model I was discussing at the start of all of this, you can use and then log out of your root account, effectively "turning off" root (and in fact, no one ever uses root except to make specific administrative changes). I didn't mention that Linux distributions also maintain their own trusted software repositories (the equivalent of an app store), and you usually never go beyond those repositories for software. If you do, you're taking your security into your own hands, just like when you sideload or download apps from untrusted sources on a phone.

    So, in my opinion, this is an app problem, not a root problem. But I do understand that in a corporate/government environment, administrators just don't want users to have that level (root) of control, ever, and it makes sense to me. I still see no problem in having a proper 'root/regular user' account system on my personal device.
    Nearly all software installed is "unknown third-party software". That's what the iOS platform is all about, get an app to solve it! You're not going to know every name and brand for million+ apps.

    The issue is WHERE its installing it from. You only expect non-malware from iOS store. You may get malware when its not scanned by a trusted party, like Guardian or how Google keeps letting in malicious apps.
    09-02-15 02:06 PM
  9. sLumPia's Avatar
    How about Jolla with it's Sailfish OS?
    Or if you're old school, try Nokia N900 with Maemo

    .
    09-02-15 06:27 PM
  10. anon(8063781)'s Avatar
    How about Jolla with it's Sailfish OS?
    Or if you're old school, try Nokia N900 with Maemo

    .
    I bought a Nexus 4 last week, and so far, I've tried Omnirom, LuneOS, and Firefox OS. Sailfish is next on the list, after I play around a bit on Firefox OS. It's a lot of fun, but typing on glass really makes me appreciate my 9900. For what I do on a daily basis (Calendar, contacts, memos, tasks, SMS, and a bit of Tapatalk) the Bold is still better than anything else.

    The N900 has always piqued my curiosity, but it has that three-row keyboard with the funny space bar placement. No offense, Passport users.
    09-02-15 09:19 PM
  11. sLumPia's Avatar
    Please update your experience with Sailfish on Nexus 4.
    I am quite interested.

    I actually owned a N900.
    And it's keyboard is fantastic for typing when you work in Linux console/terminal (I use N900 mainly for testing).
    Last edited by sLumPia; 09-03-15 at 05:48 AM.
    anon(8063781) likes this.
    09-03-15 02:00 AM
  12. sedat's Avatar
    The security issue with rooting or jail breaking a phone isn't necessarily that it has been done, but that it can be done. Unless the phone comes with the ability for the user to access root, as some of the Nexus models do, the rooting method has to have a vulnerability to exploit to get root. The fact that the vulnerability exists can sometimes be used to build an exploit into maleware that roots the phone for its own purposes unknown to the user. This is similar to the principle that if a locksmith can pick your lock, so can any number of criminals. Some locks are way more difficult to pick than others. Some phone OSs are way more difficult to root than others. Android seems to be the easiest.
    This. The majority of phones are rooted through exploits. A few exceptions offer root acces, and a few other exceptions allow official ways, but make you agree to give up any warranty left on your device first.
    09-03-15 04:54 AM
  13. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    This. The majority of phones are rooted through exploits. A few exceptions offer root acces, and a few other exceptions allow official ways, but make you agree to give up any warranty left on your device first.
    Your won't lose warranty on the Big 4 because of root.
    09-03-15 05:37 AM
  14. Smokeaire's Avatar
    Your won't lose warranty on the Big 4 because of root.
    You do lose warranty if you root your phone and install a custom ROM. If you have to get warranty work the phone needs to restored to its pre-rooted original state.

    Sent from my BlackBerry Passport.
    09-03-15 05:44 AM
  15. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    You do lose warranty if you root your phone and install a custom ROM. If you have to get warranty work the phone needs to restored to its pre-rooted original state.

    Sent from my BlackBerry Passport.
    No, that stopped a few years ago (on the Big 4 at least).

    They don't let on about it, but a rooted device shouldn't prevent a warranty return in and of itself.

    Yes, I agree about returning it to stock, but they'd be able to tell anyway if they wanted to.
    09-03-15 05:50 AM
  16. Smokeaire's Avatar
    No, that stopped a few years ago (on the Big 4 at least).

    They don't let on about it, but a rooted device shouldn't prevent a warranty return in and of itself.

    Yes, I agree about returning it to stock, but they'd be able to tell anyway if they wanted to.
    I disagree. I'll let you test your hypothesis. If warranty is covered by the carrier store then I'm sure the Worker Bee's won't know the difference. If you have to send it to the manufacturer that might be a different story.

    Sent from my BlackBerry Passport.
    09-03-15 06:15 AM
  17. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    I disagree. I'll let you test your hypothesis. If warranty is covered by the carrier store then I'm sure the Worker Bee's won't know the difference. If you have to send it to the manufacturer that might be a different story.

    Sent from my BlackBerry Passport.
    Their own internal documents should confirm. A rooted device should be accepted; they shouldn't even check.

    My memory is hazy, but I think the new policy went live in 2012-ish, either in anticipation of (or in response to) updated regulations about allowing consumers to root, jailbreak and unlock.

    ETA: here's a discussion about it on Sprint: http://androidforums.com/index.php?threads/543645/

    I've seen memos from AT&T and Sprint, and it's my understanding is that it's common policy across the board, just not one that is broadcasted.
    Smokeaire likes this.
    09-03-15 06:23 AM
  18. Smokeaire's Avatar
    Their own internal documents should confirm. A rooted device should be accepted; they shouldn't even check.

    My memory is hazy, but I think the new policy went live in 2012-ish, either in anticipation of (or in response to) updated regulations about allowing consumers to root, jailbreak and unlock.

    ETA: here's a discussion about it on Sprint: http://androidforums.com/index.php?threads/543645/

    I've seen memos from AT&T and Sprint, and it's my understanding is that it's common policy across the board, just not one that is broadcasted.
    If that is the case then good. I thought it was about unlocking, not rooting.

    Sent from my BlackBerry Passport.
    09-03-15 06:37 AM
  19. anon(8063781)'s Avatar
    Please update your experience with Sailfish on Nexus 4.
    I am quite interested.

    I actually owned a N900.
    And it's keyboard is fantastic for typing when you work in Linux console/terminal (I use N900 mainly for testing).
    You asked, so here it is.

    I installed the beta7 version of Sailfish after work today and have been exploring (beta8 has some serious flaws so I avoided it).

    First impressions:
    • whoever said the BlackBerry gestures were Byzantine and counter-intuitive ought to try Sailfish. Like anything, you'll learn the gestures if you want to, but there are many more little oddities than BB10. But I found BB10 simple from the start.
    • There's root! You can set a password by going to Settings-System-Developer Mode. Then you log into a terminal and type "devel-su", enter your root password twice, and you're set. Exit when you're done all your root-ish things, just like regular Linux.
    • The Nexus beta7 ROM doesn't have access to android apps out of the box. I read somewhere that it was possible to get access by re-doing your account credentials, but maybe that was with beta8.
    • There are some features that are not quite ready for prime time. You can't cut and paste from the browser, for example. I don't know if that's only in the beta's for non-Jolla hardware, or if all of the phones are subject to that limitation. I remember waiting for the Pre to get cut and paste too.


    All things considered, I like it. It's a lot like BB10, with a Linux base, and very stylish in presentation. It definitely requires some improvements (like cut and paste), but I'm sure that will come in time.

    I should mention that of all the ROMs I've installed Firefox OS is the fastest. It just flies. But it has very few apps. Sigh. The curse.
    sLumPia likes this.
    09-03-15 09:15 PM
  20. James Stahl's Avatar
    Can a blackberry leap be rooted..i have xmodgames on it and it says it needs to me rootes..when I try rooting it.it says it needs root permissions.?? Anybody help please

    Posted via the CrackBerry App for Android
    12-12-15 11:23 PM
  21. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    Can a blackberry leap be rooted..i have xmodgames on it and it says it needs to me rootes..when I try rooting it.it says it needs root permissions.?? Anybody help please

    Posted via the CrackBerry App for Android
    No. BB10 cannot be rooted.
    12-13-15 02:32 AM
  22. dvarnai's Avatar
    Wrong, wrong, wrong; so very wrong. The super user app and the root binaries are open source. Anyone can take a look at the source code and see exactly what it does (on Android at least).

    Posted via CB10
    But does anyone really care to take a look? Openssl is open source too yet heartbleed wasn't discovered for a long time. Linux is open source too yet there are security issues from 10+ years ago. Open source doesn't really mean much in regards to security. I'm sure there are more black hat people looking at open source codes for exploit to abuse than white hat hackers.
    Last edited by dvarnai; 12-13-15 at 10:10 AM.
    Richard Buckley likes this.
    12-13-15 03:01 AM
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