1. The Big Picture's Avatar
    I was hoping we could discuss the pros and cons of these 2 approaches.

    Most of the apps on my iPhone are able to push notifications and i find this useful, and i know that some BB10 apps do this as well but they are few and far inbetween for some unknown reason to me.

    A good example would be the Bloomberg App. It is a native app for blackberry but it doesnt do push notifications like the ios counter part.

    Does iOS use headless apps? Cause im not seeing any app that works when closed. It seems to me iOS depends on push notifications.

    Between push notifications and headless apps which of these two would be a more power efficient and faster method in delivering notifications?
    10-27-13 01:45 PM
  2. howarmat's Avatar
    push notifications can be done server side which doesnt require running per say. I headless app usually has functionality that is not notifications. Like changing a wallpaper or monitoring you battery use, changing the led light notification
    10-27-13 01:57 PM
  3. MrGlenn's Avatar
    So for Hub notifications push is the best option right? Or would that still count as partly headless? I do not think I use many apps that would benefit from fulltime headless running, most social apps would do fine just with push.
    But for Wallpaper changers, monitors etc. it is of course needed. For media players not so much (easy enough to keep one as an active frame).

    So I'd say it depends on what kind of apps you use. For my needs push/Hub integration would be plenty. As far as I know that would cover social media, rss readers, news apps etc.

    [BBM#1] BlackBerry 10 signed.
    10-27-13 02:07 PM
  4. Richard Buckley's Avatar
    One of the reasons BlackBerry is being so careful with long running headless applications is to prevent a flood of background apps that just poll for data, running down batteries and consuming data.

    Push data arriving is one of the triggers that will start a short running headless app, which will have 20 seconds to do what it needs to, posted a notification, pop toast, ask the user if it can run, etc.

    Posted via CB10
    10-27-13 02:41 PM
  5. The Big Picture's Avatar
    One of the reasons BlackBerry is being so careful with long running headless applications is to prevent a flood of background apps that just poll for data, running down batteries and consuming data.

    Push data arriving is one of the triggers that will start a short running headless app, which will have 20 seconds to do what it needs to, posted a notification, pop toast, ask the user if it can run, etc.

    Posted via CB10
    Sounds like something that triggers a short running headless app is exactly what all the news feed apps need.
    11-05-13 01:53 PM
  6. MrGlenn's Avatar
    'Push' is basically just a trigger as well, right? Just comes in through the network, while most apps would want an on-device solution.
    I wonder what kind of time-triggers the OS can handle. If you can use the clock as a trigger that would be perfect.
    Of course I have zero coding experience, but that feels like an obvious solution, making certain times act as a trigger.

    [BBM#1] BlackBerry 10 signed.
    11-05-13 02:59 PM
  7. Richard Buckley's Avatar
    'Push' is basically just a trigger as well, right? Just comes in through the network, while most apps would want an on-device solution.
    I wonder what kind of time-triggers the OS can handle. If you can use the clock as a trigger that would be perfect.
    Of course I have zero coding experience, but that feels like an obvious solution, making certain times act as a trigger.

    [BBM#1] BlackBerry 10 signed.
    A clock trigger is just polling. The worst solution for a mobile device. If the timer triggers during a short period of no connectivity processing is done for no result.

    Push comes in two broad flavours: push-pull and pure push. With push-pull the server pushes notification that data is available. The application may just post the notification and pull it when the user launches the application (which may be too late to get the data if coverage is lost) or pull the data right away which will usually works in all but the worst coverage areas. All smartphones can do this.

    The BlackBerry push model sends the data as the push notification. This works very well in marginal areas since the BlackBerry servers hold the data until they see the phone then push it down. It also is responsible for the seemingly unreal delivery speeds of emails even on very slow old GSM and EDGE networks. Obviously there is a size limit in play, and this costs more (the BlackBerry tax) though it can result in savings because of the efficiency (African user experience).

    This is the way all applications that send data to BlackBerry should be coded, but the bar is quite high. You have to develop and maintain a server, and write the server side application to initiate the push.

    I haven't written a push application for BB10 yet, but I've done some for BBOS and BES. It is magical when you get it right.

    Posted via CB10
    MrGlenn likes this.
    11-05-13 04:08 PM
  8. MrGlenn's Avatar
    Well, that just shows how little I know about coding, I would have never thought of those limitations. Thanks for the information!
    *detailed explanation*


    [BBM#1] BlackBerry 10 signed.
    11-05-13 05:01 PM

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