1. ARWestenberger's Avatar
    So I had a thought this evening, would it be possible to upgrade the ram or hard disc on a mobile phone like the Z10? It's possible to add and upgrade a PC, would it be possible to do it with a BlackBerry? Phones are basically small PCs now, so would upgrading the physical components be that far fetched?

    BlackBerry Z10 | Verizon | 10.2.0.1725 @addm | In Squircle We Trust
    09-16-13 11:49 PM
  2. tonytraj17's Avatar
    I don't see that working out well.

    Posted via CB10
    09-17-13 12:33 AM
  3. CarbonKevin's Avatar
    No.

    Google "Z10 teardown" and have a look at what makes these things tick. You'll find RAM, flash memory (there are no hard disc drives on phones), and all the critical bits are part of the main board.

    Why?

    Lots of reasons, but two major ones are space and hardware variation.

    First, space. CPUs, RAM, and disc drives in a PC all need to be removable, yet connected to the mainboard. So they use sockets and cables, which work great but take up space. Not bad in a PC tower with ~90% open space, but in a phone, where every millimeter counts? You get the picture.

    Hardware variation. If a component is available and in demand, you can bet someone in a country starting with "Ch" and ending in "ina" is gonna make a copy of the original, and probably try and make it "better". Seldom do these knockoffs actually replicate the behavior of the original 100%, and then the user gets problems. Keeping a device to a handful of hardware configurations means you can test a new OS or app on every version of a device in a short amount of time, and have a reasonable chance of minimizing hardwate-related problems.

    The modular PC is actually a pretty bad way of doing things, if you think about it. Chances are, if you run Windows and are having problems, it's a driver issue, which means a piece of modular hardware isn't playing nicely with the rest of the system. Do we need eleventy billion different wifi cards? RAM in so many speeds, timings, and sizes replacing it is a chore at the best of times? No, I'd say. Apple has a huge advantage in this realm. Stuff works, and there's very little a user can do with hardware that can change that.

    There's plenty of other equally valid reasons, these are just the first two that popped in my head.

    Posted via CB10
    00stryder likes this.
    09-17-13 01:12 AM
  4. Nugzie's Avatar
    Only if phones were like this....



    Posted via CB10
    MrRJ likes this.
    09-17-13 03:09 AM
  5. Gearheadaddy's Avatar
    So I had a thought this evening, would it be possible to upgrade the ram or hard disc on a mobile phone like the Z10? It's possible to add and upgrade a PC, would it be possible to do it with a BlackBerry? Phones are basically small PCs now, so would upgrading the physical components be that far fetched?

    BlackBerry Z10 | Verizon | 10.2.0.1725 @addm | In Squircle We Trust
    Workable if you want a phone the size of a netbook...and as heavy...

    Trusted Member
    09-17-13 04:00 AM
  6. Gambit_DE's Avatar
    There are concepts for exchangeable phone parts out there. None of them are supported or developed well

    Posted via CB10
    09-17-13 04:06 AM
  7. ARWestenberger's Avatar
    No.

    Google "Z10 teardown" and have a look at what makes these things tick. You'll find RAM, flash memory (there are no hard disc drives on phones), and all the critical bits are part of the main board.

    Why?

    Lots of reasons, but two major ones are space and hardware variation.

    First, space. CPUs, RAM, and disc drives in a PC all need to be removable, yet connected to the mainboard. So they use sockets and cables, which work great but take up space. Not bad in a PC tower with ~90% open space, but in a phone, where every millimeter counts? You get the picture.

    Hardware variation. If a component is available and in demand, you can bet someone in a country starting with "Ch" and ending in "ina" is gonna make a copy of the original, and probably try and make it "better". Seldom do these knockoffs actually replicate the behavior of the original 100%, and then the user gets problems. Keeping a device to a handful of hardware configurations means you can test a new OS or app on every version of a device in a short amount of time, and have a reasonable chance of minimizing hardwate-related problems.

    The modular PC is actually a pretty bad way of doing things, if you think about it. Chances are, if you run Windows and are having problems, it's a driver issue, which means a piece of modular hardware isn't playing nicely with the rest of the system. Do we need eleventy billion different wifi cards? RAM in so many speeds, timings, and sizes replacing it is a chore at the best of times? No, I'd say. Apple has a huge advantage in this realm. Stuff works, and there's very little a user can do with hardware that can change that.

    There's plenty of other equally valid reasons, these are just the first two that popped in my head.

    Posted via CB10
    Makes sense. Thanks for the reply.

    BlackBerry Z10 | Verizon | 10.2.0.1725 @addm | In Squircle We Trust
    09-17-13 08:45 AM
  8. sjmartin007's Avatar
    This is a great idea. I recently repair a z10 and the mother board is simple for a qualified blackberry tech or hardware tech savvy person to replace. The MB had all the ram cpu gpu embedded onto the board. If blackberry made a replacement upgrade board it would be great.

    Posted from the most powerful smartphone,z10
    09-17-13 11:05 AM
  9. MrRJ's Avatar
    Love it. I want one of these!

    Only if phones were like this....



    Posted via CB10
    09-17-13 07:14 PM
  10. ARWestenberger's Avatar
    This is a great idea. I recently repair a z10 and the mother board is simple for a qualified blackberry tech or hardware tech savvy person to replace. The MB had all the ram cpu gpu embedded onto the board. If blackberry made a replacement upgrade board it would be great.

    Posted from the most powerful smartphone,z10
    That would be awesome, right? If we could replace the processor with the latest mobile snapdragon or something like that. Or change out the 16 gb memory with 128 gb. It would make the Z10 instantly above and beyond the competition, and for someone who knows how to do that sort of thing it could be very lucrative.

    BlackBerry Z10 | Verizon | 10.2.0.1725 @addm | 333ACECA | C00056F02
    09-23-13 11:36 AM
  11. gg bb's Avatar
    The modular PC is actually a pretty bad way of doing things, if you think about it. Chances are, if you run Windows and are having problems, it's a driver issue, which means a piece of modular hardware isn't playing nicely with the rest of the system. Do we need eleventy billion different wifi cards? RAM in so many speeds, timings, and sizes replacing it is a chore at the best of times? No, I'd say. Apple has a huge advantage in this realm. Stuff works, and there's very little a user can do with hardware that can change that.

    Posted via CB10
    Hmm, 'Bad way of doing things!' I think it's surely the best way of doing things from the point of view of the consumer and from the point of small manufacturers it's incredibly liberating for both. From the point of view of Apple or any big phone or laptop manufacturer however: It's a terrible idea, not to be repeated. IBM inventer the PC (well the PC in the form we know it), they made it modular and when it became popular they lost control of the market to those companies who made the modules.


    PS: Chances are if you are running Windows you are using a laptop. It's not modularly interchangable but you may still get the problems listed above if you did not buy a business spec laptop because it may be built to a spec dictated by the retailer, a spec that looks good on paper but works poorly in reality. Maybe a high spec cpu with a low spec fan so after a few months use it randomly shuts down when you startup processor intensive apps. There are some mobile phones that have issues similar, bad spec not properly tested. Some cheap android devices. Even arguably BlackBerry Z10 at least with original BlackBerry os10.0 ( released a little too early). Q10 and Q5 better designed. Shame phones weren't a bit more modular so you could buy any phone and install BlackBerry 10.2 on it.


    Posted via CB10
    09-23-13 02:07 PM
  12. qwerty4ever's Avatar
    Workable if you want a phone the size of a netbook...and as heavy...

    Trusted Member
    A masonry brick is a more accurate comparison.

    Posted via CB10 from the BlackBerry Z10
    09-23-13 02:21 PM
  13. gg bb's Avatar
    A masonry brick is a more accurate comparison.

    Posted via CB10 from the BlackBerry Z10
    Unlikely to catch on but here it is: not the size of a brick, admittedly a little larger and heavier than the average phone. If you truely want querty4even it may be just what you need?

    http://grist.org/list/lego-like-modu...e-phone-again/

    Arr, I see it's mentioned above still worth mentioning again

    Posted via CB10
    09-23-13 03:37 PM
  14. Gearheadaddy's Avatar
    This is a great idea. I recently repair a z10 and the mother board is simple for a qualified blackberry tech or hardware tech savvy person to replace. The MB had all the ram cpu gpu embedded onto the board. If blackberry made a replacement upgrade board it would be great.

    Posted from the most powerful smartphone,z10
    It's called a Z30....

    Trusted Member Genius
    09-23-13 06:17 PM
  15. Raestloz's Avatar
    No.

    Google "Z10 teardown" and have a look at what makes these things tick. You'll find RAM, flash memory (there are no hard disc drives on phones), and all the critical bits are part of the main board.

    Why?

    Lots of reasons, but two major ones are space and hardware variation.

    First, space. CPUs, RAM, and disc drives in a PC all need to be removable, yet connected to the mainboard. So they use sockets and cables, which work great but take up space. Not bad in a PC tower with ~90% open space, but in a phone, where every millimeter counts? You get the picture.

    Hardware variation. If a component is available and in demand, you can bet someone in a country starting with "Ch" and ending in "ina" is gonna make a copy of the original, and probably try and make it "better". Seldom do these knockoffs actually replicate the behavior of the original 100%, and then the user gets problems. Keeping a device to a handful of hardware configurations means you can test a new OS or app on every version of a device in a short amount of time, and have a reasonable chance of minimizing hardwate-related problems.

    The modular PC is actually a pretty bad way of doing things, if you think about it. Chances are, if you run Windows and are having problems, it's a driver issue, which means a piece of modular hardware isn't playing nicely with the rest of the system. Do we need eleventy billion different wifi cards? RAM in so many speeds, timings, and sizes replacing it is a chore at the best of times? No, I'd say. Apple has a huge advantage in this realm. Stuff works, and there's very little a user can do with hardware that can change that.

    There's plenty of other equally valid reasons, these are just the first two that popped in my head.

    Posted via CB10
    Actually, yes, yes you do. PC's way allows you to build a rig according to your budget and/or your needs. For example, you want to upgrade your RAM, but nothing else. In Apple's hell, you need to buy an entirely new set: CPU, GPU, motherboard, hard drive, everything else, which would cost a helluva lot more than you should have.

    Or, you want a rig that is only for Microsoft Office, a few Minesweeper or two, or maybe Warcraft III, which by itself doesn't need ridiculous GPU thanks to the fact that it's a 2003 game, so you need a decent CPU with low-level GPU, most likely integrated GPU is enough. In Apple's hell, you'll have to buy a device with ****ty CPU and ****ty GPU, or buy a device with decent CPU AND decent GPU.

    Customization is always good

    Z10 STL100-1/10.1.0.4633
    09-24-13 01:41 AM

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