10-14-16 04:59 PM
44 12
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  1. keliew's Avatar
    Sad thing is that BBM could have cornered this market if RIM or BlackBerry had decided to go multi platform earlier.... sigh

    Sent using my amazing Z30
    Coming back to the lack of marketing and exposure...

    Something that BlackBerry seriously need to improve on.

    BlackBerry Passport via CB10
    10-09-16 04:58 AM
  2. Vistaus's Avatar
    Coming back to the lack of marketing and exposure...

    Something that BlackBerry seriously need to improve on.

    BlackBerry Passport via CB10
    They also should've marketed BB10 a lot better. Here in The Netherlands, I've never ever seen any BB10 ad. But now all of a sudden they do have DTEK50 ads.

    Posted via CB10 using my amazing  ,Passport (OG Red) <3
    10-09-16 05:07 AM
  3. keliew's Avatar
    I agree.

    If I didn't 'risk' in purchasing an unknown Q10 in those days, I wouldn't know BB10 and its strengths. Much less about Passport.

    I don't think it would be difficult to market BB10 although the apps...that could be challenging but not impossible.

    Chen really needs a strong team, if he doesn't have one yet.

    BlackBerry Passport via CB10
    10-09-16 06:21 AM
  4. georgethegreek's Avatar
    It all comes down to BlackBerry having a team to develop some core apps to work properly to make up the shortfall. For a long time many have complained about Facebook of Snap chat or a sports app that pushes notification.

    Sent using my amazing Z30
    10-09-16 01:14 PM
  5. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    It all comes down to BlackBerry having a team to develop some core apps to work properly to make up the shortfall. For a long time many have complained about Facebook of Snap chat or a sports app that pushes notification.
    No, it doesn't come down to BB making apps. BB isn't legally allowed to make apps for most services, because most services don't have public APIs. A number used to have public APIs, such as Facebook, but even Facebook discontinued its public APIs and will be making changes in the future that won't be supported on third-party apps.

    The reality is that you're only going to get apps if the services/developers themselves decide to support your platform - and most of them have decided that if you don't have at least 100M users, they aren't going to support your platform. Hell, many won't even support the Amazon Marketplace - which is an Android variant - simply because Amazon doesn't have enough users to justify building a separate fork of their Android app that has Amazon services in place of Google's. Again, that's with an Android app to begin with! If it isn't worth their time to support Amazon's fork, why would they work that much harder to support BB10 - and entirely different development platform - when BB10 had only a fraction of Amazon's users?

    Developers go where the users and the money are. They want a Return On Investment (ROI) for the work they do to develop, maintain, and support their apps. That requires a large userbase, and that's not something BB could deliver.

    It all really comes down to the fact that there was a limited window in time (2008-2009) when a platform could capture enough users to be successful and when the gap between the leaders and the newbies was small enough that people would be patient about missing apps and services. But by the time 2010 rolled around, it was really too late - for ANYONE - to bring a new platform to the market unless it could do amazing things that mainstream people felt was a "must have" - and would be willing to abandon the robust ecosystem of apps and services they enjoyed with iOS or Android to get it. BB10 didn't have anything like that - and neither did WinPhone (the only other mobile platform anywhere close to the Big Leagues) and so they both failed. In BB's case, it failed because Mike wasn't prepared to compete - and believed he didn't have to - back in 2006-2007. As a result, BB sat out the revolution that happened between 2007-2009 - with their only significant release being the Storm, which was an epic failure - and by 2010, before a single line of BB10 code was written - the war was lost.
    JeepBB and StephanieMaks like this.
    10-10-16 07:09 PM
  6. lfcohen's Avatar
    Ia there a native telegramm app? Cant find a good one.

    Posted via CB10
    There are a few but they are all suboptimal compared to the native clients for iOS and Android, sadly. Try Pintagram.

    Posted via the CrackBerry App for Android
    10-10-16 11:48 PM
  7. Vilory's Avatar
    If even knowing that whatsapp data is 'stolen' by facebook people doesn not even try another client, i find difficult that people switch to another program

    Posted via CB10
    10-11-16 01:07 AM
  8. keliew's Avatar
    If even knowing that whatsapp data is 'stolen' by facebook people doesn not even try another client, i find difficult that people switch to another program

    Posted via CB10
    Goes to show that the majority of the users don't care. It's a non-issue.

    BlackBerry Passport via CB10
    10-11-16 04:18 PM
  9. keliew's Avatar
    It all really comes down to the fact that there was a limited window in time (2008-2009) when a platform could capture enough users to be successful and when the gap between the leaders and the newbies was small enough that people would be patient about missing apps and services. But by the time 2010 rolled around, it was really too late - for ANYONE - to bring a new platform to the market unless it could do amazing things that mainstream people felt was a "must have" - and would be willing to abandon the robust ecosystem of apps and services they enjoyed with iOS or Android to get it. BB10 didn't have anything like that - and neither did WinPhone (the only other mobile platform anywhere close to the Big Leagues) and so they both failed.
    It's quite frightening that even the market size of Microsoft and then Nokia, it couldn't really penetrate the growing market. Either something in the background is unknown to us, or the level at which mobile software development exists is completely different how we consume and use PCs and laptops.


    BlackBerry Passport via CB10
    10-11-16 04:21 PM
  10. Ment's Avatar
    It's quite frightening that even the market size of Microsoft and then Nokia, it couldn't really penetrate the growing market. Either something in the background is unknown to us, or the level at which mobile software development exists is completely different how we consume and use PCs and laptops.


    BlackBerry Passport via CB10
    It's the opposite. Creating room for a 3rd ecosystem on a mobile is equally as hard as it is in desktop. The only difference is mobile reached that point much faster. You think if Dell put billions into Linux advertising they could bump up Linux comps to any appreciable marketshare? Maybe back in the mid-90s that might be possible but not in the world where MS and Apple both have strong positions.
    app_Developer likes this.
    10-11-16 07:14 PM
  11. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    It's quite frightening that even the market size of Microsoft and then Nokia, it couldn't really penetrate the growing market. Either something in the background is unknown to us, or the level at which mobile software development exists is completely different how we consume and use PCs and laptops.
    Microsoft did even worse than BB, considering they had virtually every advantage in their favor when the iPhone was announced: 10+ years of mobile experience, their own suite of online services, the vast majority of the desktop OS market/ecosystem, robust developer support and developer relations, and virtually unlimited operating funds. What they lacked was the focus and will to do excellent work in mobile - they had too many other priorities and, despite Bill Gates CLEARLY seeing the future and working those problems at least a decade in advance, Ballmer neglected to make mobile a big priority - the kind of all-hands-on-deck push that Gates made in '95 by instructing EVERY line of business at Microsoft to prioritize Internet integration. He showed that, as big as MS was, the ship could be turned quickly if there was a big enough push from the top - and he was right.

    Mobile for Ballmer was not enough of a priority, and like BB and Nokia, they had old, mediocre products for sale during the big mobile boom - with nothing modern to offer for years down the road - and essentially sat on the sidelines as Apple and Google gobbled up the market. By the time they finally tried to get into the game, the game was long over and the stadium was empty.

    In business, timing is often a crucial element. Lotus 123 and WordPerfect lost their leadership positions because they didn't move to Windows fast/soon enough in the early 90's - despite being the two most important desktop apps in the 80s and early 90s. Their timing was poor, and MS ate their lunch with Word and Excel. In mobile, 2008-2009 were the critical years, and only Apple and Google had modern OSs and substantial developer support (which both companies worked VERY hard to gain), and sitting those years out meant letting Apple and Google have an insurmountable lead.

    Who knows? In 20 years, maybe someone will disrupt Apple and Google with the "next big thing"...
    10-11-16 09:33 PM
  12. Vistaus's Avatar
    It's the opposite. Creating room for a 3rd ecosystem on a mobile is equally as hard as it is in desktop. The only difference is mobile reached that point much faster. You think if Dell put billions into Linux advertising they could bump up Linux comps to any appreciable marketshare? Maybe back in the mid-90s that might be possible but not in the world where MS and Apple both have strong positions.
    Linux desktop market share has gone up from 1% to over 2% in the last 13 months. Sure, it's still low but it's higher than it ever was and it's growing so more advertising would most definitely help. And Dell does advertise, I've seen ads for their Ubuntu laptops out on the streets here in the Netherlands.

    Posted via CB10 using my amazing  ,Passport (OG Red)
    10-12-16 12:50 AM
  13. Vistaus's Avatar
    Goes to show that the majority of the users don't care. It's a non-issue.

    BlackBerry Passport via CB10
    Wrong. The truth is actually a bit more complicated. A lot of people do care but the people who don't suck them into their world.

    Posted via CB10 using my amazing  ,Passport (OG Red)
    10-12-16 12:52 AM
  14. Vilory's Avatar
    Wrong. The truth is actually a bit more complicated. A lot of people do care but the people who don't suck them into their world.

    Posted via CB10 using my amazing  ,Passport (OG Red)
    So, is people lazy to move on to a more secure chat app?

    Posted via CB10
    10-12-16 03:39 AM
  15. keliew's Avatar
    The next big thing could be infotainment in vehicles or smartwatches...but who knows...

    Every company has their priorities set, whether right or wrong, determines their (sadly) market share.

    Look at Samsung now...it's the downfall moment.

    BlackBerry Passport via CB10
    10-12-16 02:22 PM
  16. Ment's Avatar
    Linux desktop market share has gone up from 1% to over 2% in the last 13 months. Sure, it's still low but it's higher than it ever was and it's growing so more advertising would most definitely help. And Dell does advertise, I've seen ads for their Ubuntu laptops out on the streets here in the Netherlands.

    Posted via CB10 using my amazing  ,Passport (OG Red)
    WinMobile got over 10% in some markets with billions put into the platform. Still failed as MS realized it couldn't sustain that growth without putting more billions into that sinkhole. A 1% bump means nothing (actual difference 0.61%) given Linux has so much more independent developer support than BB10 would ever have. Growing is better than not growing but Linux model is not one an 3rd mobile OS could emulate, a for profit company would never keep a mobile OS around for that long as mobile OS is tied to hardware sales where most Linux boxes are just repurposed Winbox.
    10-12-16 05:15 PM
  17. Vistaus's Avatar
    WinMobile got over 10% in some markets with billions put into the platform. Still failed as MS realized it couldn't sustain that growth without putting more billions into that sinkhole. A 1% bump means nothing (actual difference 0.61%) given Linux has so much more independent developer support than BB10 would ever have. Growing is better than not growing but Linux model is not one an 3rd mobile OS could emulate, a for profit company would never keep a mobile OS around for that long as mobile OS is tied to hardware sales where most Linux boxes are just repurposed Winbox.
    You think a 1% bump is nothing? Sure, it's not as much as Win market share bumps but do you even know how much users that 1% reflects? I wouldn't say that's nothing 'cause that's quite a lot of new users.
    Linux is getting more popular on computers, that's a fact. And the fact that Dell is advertising Ubuntu over here is proof that they see that too.

    WinMobile is a fail, I totally agree with you there.

    Posted via CB10 using my amazing  ,Passport (OG Red)
    10-12-16 05:48 PM
  18. Ment's Avatar
    You think a 1% bump is nothing? Sure, it's not as much as Win market share bumps but do you even know how much users that 1% reflects? I wouldn't say that's nothing 'cause that's quite a lot of new users.
    Linux is getting more popular on computers, that's a fact. And the fact that Dell is advertising Ubuntu over here is proof that they see that too.

    WinMobile is a fail, I totally agree with you there.

    Posted via CB10 using my amazing  ,Passport (OG Red)
    what I'm saying is that even that small growth isn't applicable to a mobile because if you take away converted Linux installs on former Winbox and only count actual Linux hardware sales like Dell Ubuntu box that it wouldn't even rate. Its like saying if Hackintosh grew 1000% from its small user base that it means something.
    10-12-16 05:59 PM
  19. keliew's Avatar
    Generally speaking PC and laptop sales are dropping. So no one cares anymore.

    And if you count all devices, Linux probably tops them all.

    BlackBerry Passport via CB10
    app_Developer and Vistaus like this.
    10-14-16 04:59 PM
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